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241 - 250 of 294 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 300: Medieval Methodologies (DLCL 300, MUSIC 300C)

An introduction to the essential tool-kit for medievalists, this course will give all medievalists a great head start in knowing how to access and interpret major works and topics in the field. Stanford's medieval faculty will explain the key sources and methods in the major disciplines from History to Religion, French to Arabic, English to Chinese, and Art History to German and Music. In so doing, students will be introduced to the breadth and interdisciplinary potential of Medieval Studies. A workshop devoted to Digital Technologies and Codicology/Palaeography will offer elementary training in these fundamental skills.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ENGLISH 302: Early Modern Prose Fictions

The course considers the English and European prose fictions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries--romances, picaresques, pastorals, narratives of social class, and other genres--in the context of Renaissance and present-day theories of fiction. How is narrative form conditioned by social reality, and in turn how does it provide a zone for reflection on that reality in terms different from those of the more codified genres of drama and poetry?
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ENGLISH 303D: Thinking in Fiction (COMPLIT 303D)

Is there a boundary between fact and fiction? Is fiction a stable category at all? Should we be thinking instead about description, factual reference, the place of history, and the methods of science? This course will examine the ways in which fictions figure in the workings of the human mind and human institutions, as well as in literature. Readings will include work by philosophers and critics stretching from Locke, Hume, and Adam Smith, to twentieth-century figures such as Vaihinger (the philosophy of "as if"), to "possible worlds" theory. Bruno Latour, Marie-Laure Ryan, and Ann Banfield will be joined by Catherine Gallagher and narratologists. In reaching back to the eighteenth century, we also can have in mind important essays or prefaces by such writers as Horace Walpole, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, and Anne Radcliffe. Novels, of course, raise large questions about fictionality. Works for study include: The Female Quixote, The Castle of Otranto, Tristram Shandy, and Sense and Sensibility.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ENGLISH 306: Theorizing Hybridity: Whiteness

"Whiteness" has been a sign of the universal, the unmarked, the taken-for-granted, the default; it indexes privilege, divinity, beauty, cultural superiority, moral authority, and oppressive domination. As the folk saying went: "white is right." This interdisciplinary course takes up case studies in literature, art, photography, film and performance that both revisit and go beyond the whiteness studies of the 1990s to consider its vast, elastic utility within the modern imagination as well as its urgent contemporary relevance to ask: "why white now?"
Last offered: Winter 2019

ENGLISH 307D: Bringing the Archives to Life

Introduction to the critical skills required for working in the archives. Students will be taught the core methods for working with archival sources, and will be trained in the transcription, editing, interpretation, and publication of primary textual materials. Our textual materials will be generically varied and chronologically diverse, and we shall move from late medieval to contemporary holdings in Stanford University Library¿s Special Collections, in other archives at Stanford, and in local private holdings.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ENGLISH 308: The Civilizing Process

This course considers historical changes in daily life, as practices and everyday ethics as well as ideas and rhetoric, to conceptualize the large-scale meanings of modernity and modernization, from roughly 1600 to the present. Beginning with a series of major thinkers from the mid-20th century Norbert Elias, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu we will assess the compatibility of their accounts of modern changes to domains they call, variously, habitus,interdependence,power,action,work,labor, and life. The first half of the quarter will be devoted to these theories. The second half will consider recent work in literary history, social and cultural history, gender and sexual theory, which has attempted to demarcate and explain a number of revolutions in human practices located in different historical moments and phases of the ongoing modernizing process: an affective revolution,humanitarian revolution,rights revolution, sex-gender and sexual revolutions, towards revoluti more »
This course considers historical changes in daily life, as practices and everyday ethics as well as ideas and rhetoric, to conceptualize the large-scale meanings of modernity and modernization, from roughly 1600 to the present. Beginning with a series of major thinkers from the mid-20th century Norbert Elias, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu we will assess the compatibility of their accounts of modern changes to domains they call, variously, habitus,interdependence,power,action,work,labor, and life. The first half of the quarter will be devoted to these theories. The second half will consider recent work in literary history, social and cultural history, gender and sexual theory, which has attempted to demarcate and explain a number of revolutions in human practices located in different historical moments and phases of the ongoing modernizing process: an affective revolution,humanitarian revolution,rights revolution, sex-gender and sexual revolutions, towards revolutions, too, of practices concerning nonhuman entities and statistical or aggregated visions of humanity. Though oriented to literary-historical knowledge, reading will be heavily historical and social-scientific; students are expected to absorb and respect the disciplinary and methodological canons of various disciplines, and graduate students from outside literature will welcomed.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ENGLISH 308B: Gilded Age American Literature

Introduction to the creative innovations and the political tensions that stemmed from the formation of a multicultural society during the age of industrialization. We will attempt to place literary works in their historical and cultural contexts, while also surveying recent critical and theoretical developments in areas such as Realism, Naturalism, Regionalism, Minority and Race Studies, and so on.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 312: Native Intelligence

This course will help students build a template for rigorous interdisciplinary writing. It uses a series of case studies to reveal the disparate ways in which literary study and its social-scientific ¿others¿ have approached the problems of narrative and representation. In doing so, the course engages enduring theoretical questions about the nature of communication and the risks of encounters that cross divides of culture, class, and language. Students will use insights from class to develop a narrative project of their own, which may take the form of traditional seminar paper or a grant proposal to support further research.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ENGLISH 313: Performance and Performativity (FEMGEN 313, TAPS 313)

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 314: Epic and Empire (COMPLIT 320A)

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)
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