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21 - 30 of 294 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 12AX: Locating the Self: The Poetics and Politics of Identity

What is identity? How do poets conceive of, articulate, and depict in their work the various identities they inhabit vis-à-vis class, race, nationhood, religion, gender and sexuality? This poetry workshop invites students to locate themselves within the sociopolitical framework of our day¿as artists, writers, and citizens¿and to consider the role that our personal and collective identities play in the creative work we generate. Course assignments will include close reading of poetry by a diverse range of poets and guided writing assignments.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Shanahan, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 12C: Introduction to English III: Modern Literature

Survey of the major trends in literary history from 1850 to the present.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ENGLISH 13Q: Imaginative Realms

This class looks at the tradition of the imagined universe in fiction and poetry. Special topics include magical realism, artificial intelligence, and dystopias. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. For undergrads only.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 15Q: Family Trees: The Intergenerational Novel

The vast majority of novels feature a central protagonist, or a cast of characters whose interactions play out over weeks or months. But some stories overflow our life spans, and cannot be truthfully told without the novelist reaching far back in time. In this Sophomore Seminar, we will consider three novels that seek to tell larger, more ambitious stories that span decades and continents. In the process, we will discuss how novelists build believable worlds, craft memorable characters, keep us engaged as readers, and manage such ambitious projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 16Q: Family Stories

This creative writing workshop will explore the idea of family. We¿ll begin with our questions: How do we conceptualize the word family? How do family histories, stories, mythologies, and languages shape our narratives? What does family have to do with the construction of a self? How can we investigate the self and all of its many contexts in writing? We¿ll consider how we might work from our questions in order to craft work that is meaningful and revealing. Students will have the opportunity to write in both poetry and prose, as well as to develop their own creative cross-genre projects. Along the way, we¿ll discuss elements of craft essential to strong writing: how to turn the self into a speaker; how create the world of a piece through image, detail, and metaphor; how to craft beautiful sentences and lines; how to find a form; and many other topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Perham, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 16SC: Learning Theater: From Audience to Critic at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Who doesn't love going to a play: sitting in the darkened theater, an anonymous member of the audience waiting to be entertained, charmed, and challenged? But how many of us know enough about the details of the plays, their interpretation, their production, and acting itself, to allow us to appreciate fully the theatrical experience? In this seminar, we will spend 13 days in Ashland, Oregon, at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF), where we will attend these plays: Shakespeare's Macbeth, As You Like It, All's Well that Ends Well, and the bilingual adaptation by Lydia Garcia and Bill Rauch of La Comedia of Errors; the world premiere of Octavio Solis' Mother Road, based on characters from John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath; the West Coast premiere of Christina Anderson's How to Catch Creation; Eva Le Gallienne and Florida Friebus' Alice in Wonderland; the world premiere of The 1491's Between Two Knees; Paula Vogel's Indecent; Lauren Yee's Cambodian Rock Band, with music by more »
Who doesn't love going to a play: sitting in the darkened theater, an anonymous member of the audience waiting to be entertained, charmed, and challenged? But how many of us know enough about the details of the plays, their interpretation, their production, and acting itself, to allow us to appreciate fully the theatrical experience? In this seminar, we will spend 13 days in Ashland, Oregon, at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF), where we will attend these plays: Shakespeare's Macbeth, As You Like It, All's Well that Ends Well, and the bilingual adaptation by Lydia Garcia and Bill Rauch of La Comedia of Errors; the world premiere of Octavio Solis' Mother Road, based on characters from John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath; the West Coast premiere of Christina Anderson's How to Catch Creation; Eva Le Gallienne and Florida Friebus' Alice in Wonderland; the world premiere of The 1491's Between Two Knees; Paula Vogel's Indecent; Lauren Yee's Cambodian Rock Band, with music by Dengue Fever; and Mark O'Donnell and Thomas Meehan's Hairspray, based on John Waters' 1988 film. (To read more about these productions, go to www.osfashland.org. We will also spend time backstage, meeting with actors, designers, and artistic and administrative directors of OSF. Students will read the plays before the seminar begins. In Ashland, they will produce staged readings and design a final paper based on one of the productions. These reviews will be delivered to the group and turned in on Thursday, September 19.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Paulson, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 17Q: Political Poetry

This workshop is devoted to reading and creating politically engaged poetry. Students will look closely at the intersection between activism, identity, and form, focusing on 20th and 21st century poets responding to their sociohistorical moment.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 18Q: Writer's Salon

This course explores from a writer's perspective what it takes to craft a successful novel, short story collection, or book of poetry. You will read three prize-winning books from Bay Area authors, including Creative Writing instructors here at Stanford. Each author will visit our class to talk about their work and the writing process. From week to week, you will complete short writing exercises culminating in a longer story or series of poems that you share with class. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 18SI: From Canon to 'Fanon': Fan Fiction and the Democratization of Literature

Fan fiction has been called one of the great unsung popular literary movements of the past fifty years. Long in existence but increasingly mainstream, the genre has emerged onto the 21st-century literary landscape as a cultural force to be reckoned with. This course will treat fan fiction as a legitimate genre of literature worthy of academic attention and analysis. We will examine both text and context, considering tropes and style of 'fanfic' as well as cultural impact and influence. Key themes of the course include intertextuality, reader-response criticism, and fanfic as a medium for narrative expansion and transgression.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ENGLISH 19Q: I Bet You Think You're Funny: Humor Writing Workshop

Nothing is harder than being funny on purpose. We often associate humor with lightness, and sometimes that's appropriate, but humor is inextricably interlinked with pain and anger, and our funniest moments often spring from our deepest wounds. Humor can also allow us a platform for rage and indignation when other forms of rhetoric feel inadequate. This workshop will take students through the techniques and aesthetics of humor writing, in a variety of forms, and the main product of the quarter will be to submit for workshop a sustained piece of humor writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Porter, E. (PI)
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