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161 - 170 of 293 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 159A: Literature that Changed the World (AFRICAAM 159A, CSRE 159I)

How does literary art get involved in politics? What is the border between propaganda and art? This class examines moments when writers seem suddenly not only to represent politically charged topics and themes, but to have a part in bringing about political change. We¿ll look at case studies from the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, the American Civil Rights struggle, 19th century Russia, and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory (COMPLIT 161E)

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 162W: Writing Intensive Seminar in English (WISE)

In these highly regarded, small-group seminars, students explore unique topics in English language literature, reading select primary texts alongside exemplary critical works and/or other cultural artifacts, while also honing their research and writing skills through series of assignments that culminate in a substantial original research essay. Classes are capped at 8, allowing for individualized attention and rich feedback. 2019-2020 course topics include: African American author-critics; Asian encounters in American literature; queer drama of the AIDS crisis; Elizabeth Bishop and 20th century poetry; Shakespeare and Marx; dialogue and narrative theory; the politics of ¿bad reading¿; and protest literature. Click ¿Schedule¿ below to see individual course titles (in Notes). For fuller descriptions, go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise. Enrollment is by permission. English majors must take at least one WISE to fulfill WIM. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 163D: Shakespeare: The Ethical Challenge (TAPS 163D)

Was the eighteenth century right in proclaiming Shakespeare to be the greatest moral philosopher? What are the ethical challenges Shakespeare's major plays still pose for us? Can we divorce ethical decisions from the contingencies of experience? We will ask a series of normative ethical questions (to do with pleasure, power, old age, self-sacrifice, and truth telling) and attempt to answer them in relation to the dramatic situation of Shakespeare's characters on the one hand and our own cultural situation on the other. The ethical challenge of Shakespearean drama will be set against selected readings in ethical theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

ENGLISH 163F: Shakespeare Now and Then

In this Introduction to Shakespeare on film, we will study approximately five Shakespearean plays, including Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing, and Macbeth, alongside a selection of their movie adaptations. As well as getting to grips with the plays printed texts, we will investigate how the plays meanings and significations can change radically in performance.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 165: Perspectives on American Identity (AMSTUD 160)

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 167H: The Ethical Gangster

(English majors must register for 5 units) A study of recent developments in understanding human moral psychology using mafia movies to explore the differences between Kantian and Utilitarian moral theory. We will study the greatest hits of gangster fiction and film, from Fielding's Jonathan Wild to The Sopranos.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

ENGLISH 170D: The Oral and Textual Beowulf

Was the Old English poem Beowulf intended to be read or heard? Was it primarily a literary text to be fastidiously poured over by theologically minded monks or was it a rousing tale for bards to declaim at courtly feasts, inflaming the passions of noble warriors swigging mead and chewing meat? Nobody knows. And yet this question lay at the heart of scholarly study of the poem for most of the 20th century because a definitive answer could dramatically change how we understand the poem. This course takes for granted the most important consensus to precipitate from these 20th century studies and debates: that the literary artifact which survives today can be nothing other than what it is¿that is, a poem written in a manuscript dating from about the year 1000 AD¿but also that this written poem was undoubtedly composed using formal techniques that must have originally been the tools of spontaneous oral versification. This existential hybridity will lead us into discussions of the poem¿s oth more »
Was the Old English poem Beowulf intended to be read or heard? Was it primarily a literary text to be fastidiously poured over by theologically minded monks or was it a rousing tale for bards to declaim at courtly feasts, inflaming the passions of noble warriors swigging mead and chewing meat? Nobody knows. And yet this question lay at the heart of scholarly study of the poem for most of the 20th century because a definitive answer could dramatically change how we understand the poem. This course takes for granted the most important consensus to precipitate from these 20th century studies and debates: that the literary artifact which survives today can be nothing other than what it is¿that is, a poem written in a manuscript dating from about the year 1000 AD¿but also that this written poem was undoubtedly composed using formal techniques that must have originally been the tools of spontaneous oral versification. This existential hybridity will lead us into discussions of the poem¿s other various dualities which are inextricable from the question of its composition. Is the poem essentially Christian with pagan elements or essentially secular with Christian elements? Does it have a heroic or anti-heroic moral? Are its many frame narratives essential to the exposition of its themes or secondary to a consideration of the basic plot? In the pursuit of answers to these questions and more we will immerse ourselves in Beowulf by reading it in the original Old English, performing the poem in oral recitation, and studying the manuscript via online facsimile.nPrerequisite: Introduction to Old English Language and Literature. Taken together with its prerequisite, this course satisfies the undergraduate foreign language requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Ashton, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 172D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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