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111 - 120 of 294 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 126A: The Country and the City: Mapping Nineteenth-Century British Literature

As the 2016 Presidential Election so powerfully demonstrated, the divide between urban and rural life remains fundamental to the contemporary American experience. This course traces the emergence of that contrast¿both a geographic and economic reality and a construction of art and politics¿in nineteenth-century Britain, as the widespread changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution redrew the social map along the dividing lines between the country and the city. Alongside key works of realist fiction by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot, we will read a selection of short texts from a range of styles and genres. From Wordsworth¿s pastoral idylls to the ¿nether world¿ of Gissing¿s London slums, we will explore how writing about the country and the city responds to transformations across the century in social relationships and individual and collective identity, economic and political power, manners and morals, and conceptions of nature and the environment. The course will conclude with excerpts from two works of non-fiction that address recent political events, asking how the nineteenth-century tradition of the country and the city can help us to understand and navigate the difficult terrain of culture and politics today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Taylor, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 126B: The Nineteenth Century Novel

A set of major works of art produced at the peak of the novel's centrality as a cultural form: Austen's Emma, Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Eliot's Middlemarch, Dickens's Great Expectations, Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles. The paradoxes of work, consciousness and the organization of narrative experience, habit and attention. Urban experience, shifting forms of individualism, ways of knowing other persons. Binary and concentric structures, happiness and moral action, arrays of characters.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 126H: Passion, Purity, Politics: Fanaticism and British Literature, 1790-1890

A fanatic, Winston Churchill once declared, is ¿someone who can¿t change his mind and won¿t change the subject.¿ Unrelenting, irrational, and unwilling or unable to change, the fanatic may seem to embody everything that is wrong with politics and culture today. In this class, we will delve into the complex literary and political history of this deceptively simple figure, tracing the evolution of the fanatic in British culture from the aftermath of the French Revolution through the fin de siècle. We will consider fanaticism¿s place in the contest of revolutionary and counter-revolutionary forces, in the Victorian ¿crisis of faith,¿ in debates over the rights of women, and in the imperialist project and its ideological justifications. Focusing on the ways novelists have used literary character to explore different aspects of fanaticism, we will explore the place of conviction, transcendence, and the will in the ordinary, everyday world of the realist novel. The course will conclude with a meditation on the relevance of the concept of the fanatic to our own ¿post-secular¿ historical moment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Taylor, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 127: The Tragedy of Becoming an Adult

We have to grow up. We have no choice in the matter. But what does this lack of choice mean for the way experience growing up¿either as a tragedy or perhaps not? This course will explore various writers¿ approaches to one of the defining genres of the novel, the bildungsroman, the story of finding one¿s place in the world. We all negotiate between our youthful dreams and the compromises of experience. How do we forge our storylines? By choosing a vocation? A romantic partner? By moving from the country to the city, or from one country to another? Reading stories from Victorian and modernist Britain as well as contemporary America, we will question the variety of ways in which the bildungsroman explores questions of identity formation, social changes, and experiments in literary form. Readings include works by Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, D.H. Lawrence, Gertrude Stein, Jeffrey Eugenides, Junot Díaz, and Hayao Miyazaki.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ENGLISH 129A: Body Text

¿Written on the body is a secret code only visible in certain lights; the accumulations of a lifetime gather there. In places the palimpsest is so heavily worked that the letters feel like braille. I like to keep my body rolled up away from prying eyes. Never unfold too much, tell the whole story.¿ ¿Jeanette Winterson, Written on the BodynThis course asks when and where flesh becomes text. Through an eclectic mix of short stories, novels, film, nonfiction, and critical theory, we will think through how text becomes a metaphor for, substitute for, and/or extension of the body. What exactly do we talk about when we talk about The Body? How are bodies written into¿and out of¿existence? Topics will include the virtual body, the eating-disordered body, the choreographed body, the medicalized trans body, and the black body in the carceral state. Throughout the course, we will draw out the theoretical in the literary and the literary in the theoretical, and will pay special attention to the relationship between embodied practice and (traditionally) disembodied thought.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ENGLISH 130: Sex and the Novel (FEMGEN 130S)

How do novels represent sexual life? This course reads texts from the eighteenth century to the present day, and considers how novelists represent the discombobulating effects of desire in fictional prose. Authors may include: S. Richardson, N. Hawthorne, J. Austen, E. Brontë, G. Gissing, H. James, D.H. Lawrence, J. Joyce, V. Nabokov, J. Baldwin, A. Hollinghurst and Z. Smith.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 131B: American Travel Films, 1925-2013

For more than a century, cars and movies have occupied a romantic place in the American imagination, as vehicles that can take us someplace new and engines for our fantasies of mobility, freedom and personal expression. Perhaps this is one reason why the road movie is one of the most enduring subgenres of twentieth-century film. In this class, we'll watch and discuss ten celebrated American travel films, one for each decade starting from Buster Keaton's silent Go West (1925) and arriving at Alexander Payne's wry anti-road film Nebraska (2013). In between we'll travel by car, bus, motorcycle and even on foot across America and beyond, searching for answers to the motivating questions for this course: what is the attraction of the open road, and how is the romance of its call embraced and challenged by the multiple genres of these films, the concerns of the decades in which they were produced, and the limits they impose on the idea of unrestricted travel, individual growth and independen more »
For more than a century, cars and movies have occupied a romantic place in the American imagination, as vehicles that can take us someplace new and engines for our fantasies of mobility, freedom and personal expression. Perhaps this is one reason why the road movie is one of the most enduring subgenres of twentieth-century film. In this class, we'll watch and discuss ten celebrated American travel films, one for each decade starting from Buster Keaton's silent Go West (1925) and arriving at Alexander Payne's wry anti-road film Nebraska (2013). In between we'll travel by car, bus, motorcycle and even on foot across America and beyond, searching for answers to the motivating questions for this course: what is the attraction of the open road, and how is the romance of its call embraced and challenged by the multiple genres of these films, the concerns of the decades in which they were produced, and the limits they impose on the idea of unrestricted travel, individual growth and independence. A secondary goal of this class is to familiarize students with the language and concepts of film art and criticism. To that end, we'll pair our films with readings from Bordwell, Thompson and Smith's influential textbook Film Art: an Introduction. Students will therefore not only be immersed in the themes specific to this course, but will also learn how to analyze and speak about film as a medium.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 131C: A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Fiction has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, fiction itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. So what constitutes an ¿intelligence¿ within literature or technology? In either field, is it ever possible to overcome the problem of other minds? Is there an ultimate boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? This course will begin with Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) and Edgar Allan Poe¿s ¿Maelzel¿s Chess Player¿ (1836), then proceed through works such as Samuel Butler¿s Erewhon (1872), Isaac Asimov¿s I, Robot (1950), Stanley Kubrick¿s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and Stanford lecturer Scott Hutchins¿s A Working Theory of Love (2012), including a possible visit from Hutchins. Throughout, we will be asking ourselves what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today.
Last offered: Summer 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 132C: Cosmopolitan Crime: Global Detective Fiction

Detective fiction is one of the most popular genres in the world. It is also, interestingly, one of the most international genres as well. In this course, we¿ll look at a selection of globally oriented detective stories, from the Sherlock Holmes to The Tunnel, and explore the ways in which detective fiction participates in the global imagination. How do these detective stories represent the tension between community and cultural difference? How do conceptions of cultural or racial ¿otherness¿ influence views of suspicion, guilt or innocence? How far does detective fiction fulfill a cosmopolitan ideal of transnational justice, and in what ways does it fall short? As we analyze the conventions of the detective genre and consider how it examines issues faced by our increasingly globalized community¿including immigration, imperialism, identity politics, and terrorism¿we¿ll ask larger questions about the nature of community, morality, law, and justice across national and cultural boundaries.
Last offered: Summer 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 133: Transatlantic Female Modernists (FEMGEN 133T)

How did American and British women writers express their experiences of modernity? A major critical lens on modernism interrogates questions of gender and sexuality, including how women expressed the experiences of `writing as a woman during these years (1910-1940). But distinctions of race, class, culture, nation, and literary inheritance were powerful determinants on how individual writers gave voice to their creative aspirations. This course explores what binds and what differentiates various forms of aesthetic, political, and cultural representation in the works of pioneering transatlantic innovators: Virginia Woolf; Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Zora Neale Hurston; Djuna Barnes; Katherine Mansfield; Nella Larson; Amy Lowell; H.D.; Jessie Fauset; Nancy Cunard.
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