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21 - 30 of 63 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 125: Virginia Woolf in the Age of #MeToo (FEMGEN 125V)

Where is Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) in the age of #MeToo? How does a groundbreaking `first wave feminist theorist and novelistic innovator speak to successors in the third and fourth waves? Are waves the right metaphor for signaling intergenerational feminist conversation? This course argues that almost everything surging around the #MeToo movement can be found in Woolf's works, from gender oppression, to the politics of women's entry into the workplace, to the historical struggle of women to be heard and believed. Yet, just as the hashtag makes a portmanteau of the individual and the collective, so too does Woolf's life and writing merge the possibilities and challenges of that conflation. We begin with Woolf's most political arguments in A Room of One's Own (1929) and Three Guineas (1938), tying them to the premier investigative journalism and reportage on the current #MeToo movement, and then turn to the politics of reading and identity in her less acclaimed but equally important journalistic work, and to the representation of women's collective lives in her fiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 146A: Steinbeck (AMSTUD 146A)

Introduction to the work of an American writer, beloved by general readers, often reviled by critics, whose career spanned from the Great Depression through World War II to the social upheavals of the 1960s. Focus on the social and political contexts of Steinbeck's major works; his fascination with California and Mexico; his interdisciplinary interest in marine biology and in philosophy; his diverse experiments with literary form, including drama and film.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 151F: Angelheaded Hipsters: Beat Writers of San Francisco and New York (AMSTUD 151F)

Reading of central writers of the Beat movement (Ginsberg, Kerouac, di Prima, Snyder, Whalen) as well as some related writers (Creeley, Gunn, Levertov). Issues explored include NY and SF, Buddhism and leftist politics, poetry and jazz. Some exposure to reading poems to jazz accompaniment. Examination of some of the writers and performers growing out of the Beats: Bob Dylan, rock music, especially from San Francisco, and jazz.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fields, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 154F: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 157H: Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (BIOHOPK 157H, BIOHOPK 257H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station, perched at the edge of the Pacific, where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. Here, in this spectacular setting, we learn to pay attention to our encounters with the natural world and translate sensory experience to the page. Students keep field journals to collect observations and cultivate a reflective practice. In-class writing experiments lead to original nonfiction combining personal narrative and scientific curiosity. Students workshop their projects, receiving supportive feedback from the group. You will develop a more patient and observant eye, improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts, and, hopefully, have a bit of fun along the way.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 162W: Writing Intensive Seminar in English (WISE)

In these highly regarded, small-group seminars, students explore unique topics in English language literature, reading select primary texts alongside exemplary critical works and/or other cultural artifacts, while also honing their research and writing skills through series of assignments that culminate in a substantial original research essay. Classes are capped at 8, allowing for individualized attention and rich feedback. Click Schedule below to see individual course titles (in Notes). For fuller details and descriptions, go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise. Enrollment is by permission. 2018-2019 course topics include: neo-slave narratives; nineteenth-century novels; Renaissance drama; American conspiracy theories; James Joyce and modernism; Shakespeare adaptations; colonies of the gothic; and the Beats. English majors must take at least one WISE to fulfill WIM. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 177: Contemporary Novel in U.S. Perspective (AMSTUD 177)

This course investigates a selection of novels from 2001 to the present, either authored in the United States or strongly and meaningfully received here by critics and gatekeepers. In the absence of a fixed academic canon or acknowledged tradition of exemplary works, this course includes evaluation as one of its central enterprises. Students help to make arguments for which works matter and why. Students consider topics including the demotion of the novel to a minor art form, competition from the image, transformations of celebrity culture (in literature and outside it), relevance or irrelevance of the digital age, aftermaths of the modernist and postmodernist project, eccentricity and marginality, race and gender politics in putatively post-feminist, post-racial,and post-political vantage, and problems of meaning in rich societies oriented to risk, probability, economization, health, consumption, comfort, and recognition or representation (rather than action or event). Novels and short stories may be supplemented by philosophical and sociological visions of the contemporary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Greif, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

May be taken twice for credit. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 90 or 91.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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