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1 - 10 of 19 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 9CV: Creative Expression in Writing

Online workshop whose primary focus is to give students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 12AX: Locating the Self: The Poetics and Politics of Identity

What is identity? How do poets conceive of, articulate, and depict in their work the various identities they inhabit vis-à-vis class, race, nationhood, religion, gender and sexuality? This poetry workshop invites students to locate themselves within the sociopolitical framework of our day¿as artists, writers, and citizens¿and to consider the role that our personal and collective identities play in the creative work we generate. Course assignments will include close reading of poetry by a diverse range of poets and guided writing assignments.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Shanahan, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 16SC: Learning Theater: From Audience to Critic at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Who doesn't love going to a play: sitting in the darkened theater, an anonymous member of the audience waiting to be entertained, charmed, and challenged? But how many of us know enough about the details of the plays, their interpretation, their production, and acting itself, to allow us to appreciate fully the theatrical experience? In this seminar, we will spend 13 days in Ashland, Oregon, at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF), where we will attend these plays: Shakespeare's Macbeth, As You Like It, All's Well that Ends Well, and the bilingual adaptation by Lydia Garcia and Bill Rauch of La Comedia of Errors; the world premiere of Octavio Solis' Mother Road, based on characters from John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath; the West Coast premiere of Christina Anderson's How to Catch Creation; Eva Le Gallienne and Florida Friebus' Alice in Wonderland; the world premiere of The 1491's Between Two Knees; Paula Vogel's Indecent; Lauren Yee's Cambodian Rock Band, with music by more »
Who doesn't love going to a play: sitting in the darkened theater, an anonymous member of the audience waiting to be entertained, charmed, and challenged? But how many of us know enough about the details of the plays, their interpretation, their production, and acting itself, to allow us to appreciate fully the theatrical experience? In this seminar, we will spend 13 days in Ashland, Oregon, at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF), where we will attend these plays: Shakespeare's Macbeth, As You Like It, All's Well that Ends Well, and the bilingual adaptation by Lydia Garcia and Bill Rauch of La Comedia of Errors; the world premiere of Octavio Solis' Mother Road, based on characters from John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath; the West Coast premiere of Christina Anderson's How to Catch Creation; Eva Le Gallienne and Florida Friebus' Alice in Wonderland; the world premiere of The 1491's Between Two Knees; Paula Vogel's Indecent; Lauren Yee's Cambodian Rock Band, with music by Dengue Fever; and Mark O'Donnell and Thomas Meehan's Hairspray, based on John Waters' 1988 film. (To read more about these productions, go to www.osfashland.org. We will also spend time backstage, meeting with actors, designers, and artistic and administrative directors of OSF. Students will read the plays before the seminar begins. In Ashland, they will produce staged readings and design a final paper based on one of the productions. These reviews will be delivered to the group and turned in on Thursday, September 19.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Paulson, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 90V: Fiction Writing

Online workshop course that explores the ways in which writers of fiction have used language to examine the world, to create compelling characters, and to move readers. We will begin by studying a selection of stories that demonstrate the many techniques writers use to create fictional worlds; we'll use these stories as models for writing exercises and short assignments, leading to a full story draft. We will study figurative language, character and setting development, and dramatic structure, among other elements of story craft. Then, each student will submit a full draft and receive feedback from the instructor and his/her classmates. This course is taught entirely online, but retains the feel of a traditional classroom. Optional synchronous elements such as discussion and virtual office hours provide the student direct interaction with both the instructor and his/her classmates. Feedback on written work ¿ both offered to and given by the student ¿ is essential to the course and creates class rapport.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content. May be repeated for credit.nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 91V: Creative Nonfiction

Online workshop course. Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 120C: CALIFORNIA: A SENSE OF PLACE

Description: ¿A place belongs forever to whoever claims it hardest,¿ writes Joan Didion, ¿remembers it most obsessively, wrenches it from itself, shapes it, renders it, loves it so radically that he remakes it in his image.¿ From the Gold Rush to Hollywood to Silicon Valley, Yosemite to the Salton Sea, in this course we¿ll encounter a series of writers and artists whose work is set in California, or participates in its imagining, and throughout consider how culture and a sense of place are closely related. How does a novel, photograph, or film conjure community or landscape? When we think of California, whose stories are included, and whose are left out? Possible texts: works by Mary Austin, Mike Davis, Rebecca Solnit, John Steinbeck, and Nathanael West; the films Sunset Boulevard,Clueless,and There Will Be Blood; and the art of Carlton Watkins, Dorothea Lange, Richard Misrach, Martín Ramírez, Wayne Thiebaud, and Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II. We¿ll visit New Almaden, a quicksilver mine in the 19thcentury, later Superfund Site, now a museum and popular trail.*For the final paper, students will research a place in California of their choice. *Or a Mission mural walk, or the Oakland Museum of California.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bolten, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 121C: Superheroes, Supercops: American Police Power

Description: America has an obsession with superheroes and a problem with police--the last decade has been dominated by both blockbuster superhero films and negotiations over police power. This course will take an intersectional, interdisciplinary, and critical look at models of police power as they appear in superhero/supercop texts, including film, thinkpieces, novels for young readers, and comics, as well as a look at the historic foundations of American policing and contemporary police theory. What do superheroes teach us about police? And what do police teach us about superheroes? How can we read cultural production around this topic in a useful way? What constitutes propaganda, and what constitutes useful debate?
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nomura, N. (PI)
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