2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 55 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests.nn
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CT: Special Topics in Creative Expression

Focus on a particular topic or process of creative expression. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 1: History and Theory of Novel Group (DLCL 1)

This reading group, organized by the Undergraduate Initiative of the Center for the Study of the Novel (CSN), is intended for undergraduates interested in the study of the novel. The group will meet four times in the Spring Quarter, to discuss works by major theorists of the novel, including Lukàcs, Watt, Bakhtin, Barthes, Foucault, Moretti, Sedgwick, and others. Discussions will be led by CSN's graduate coordinators, Elena Dancu (DLCL) and Mark Taylor (English). All readings will be available on CourseWork.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: McGurl, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 18SI: From Canon to 'Fanon': Fan Fiction and the Democratization of Literature

Fan fiction has been called one of the great unsung popular literary movements of the past fifty years. Long in existence but increasingly mainstream, the genre has emerged onto the 21st-century literary landscape as a cultural force to be reckoned with. This course will treat fan fiction as a legitimate genre of literature worthy of academic attention and analysis. We will examine both text and context, considering tropes and style of 'fanfic' as well as cultural impact and influence. Key themes of the course include intertextuality, reader-response criticism, new literacies, and fanfic as a medium for narrative expansion and transgression.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 1D: Dickens Book Club

Through the academic year, we will read one Dickens novel, one number a week for 19 weeks, as the Victorians would have done as they read the serialized novel over the course of 19 months. The group gets together once a week for an hour and a half to discuss each number, to look carefully at the pattern that the author is weaving, to guess, as the Victorians would have done, what might be coming next, and to investigate the Victorian world Dickens presents. We look carefully at themes, characters, metaphorical patterns, and scenes that form Dickens' literary world, and spend increasing time evaluating the critique that Dickens levels at Victorian life. The weekly gatherings are casual; the discussion is lively and pointed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 21: Introduction to American Literature (AMSTUD 121, ENGLISH 121)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 121.) An exploration of the diverse political, racial, social, and aesthetic questions which inform works of American literature from the early national period to the late twentieth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 47N: Sports and Culture

Stanford has the most successful student-athlete program in the country (maybe ever) and athletics are an enormously important aspect of Stanford¿s student culture. This course looks in depth at sports in American culture. Through film, essays, fiction, poetry and other media, we will explore an array of topics including representations of the athlete, violence, beauty, the mass media, ethics, college sports, race and gender.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Vermeule, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

(Formerly 94A.) Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints