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41 - 50 of 77 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 184D: Race, Gender, and Literary Digital Humanities (CSRE 184E)

This course will introduce students to the ways that the practices of literary text mining can help us to understand, study, and shape our understanding of identity. Each week, we will spend one class discussing critical works by theorists like Toni Morrison, and Linda Martín Alcoff and digital scholars like Roopika Risam and Ted Underwood; we will then spend the second class of the week learning and practicing digital methods in programs like Python and Gephi. Students do not need any programming knowledge to take this class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Porter, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 184E: Literary Text Mining

This course will train students in applied methods for computationally analyzing texts for humanities research. The skills students will gain will include basic programming for textual analysis, applied statistical evaluation of results and the ability to present these results within a formal research paper or presentation. Students in the course will also learn the prerequisite steps of such an analysis including corpus selection and cleaning, metadata collection, and selecting and creating an appropriate visualization for the results.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Heuser, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 189D: Literature and Science

How do novelists and scientists render visible the invisible? How do they think outside the accumulated meanings of their time? And how do they confront the risk of disenchantment that knowledge and explanation pose? This course centers on major literary works including Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles, and Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse. Topics include experimentation in science and in art, the use of fictions in science, how science and art train our perceptual capacities, imagination and responsibility, metaphor and metaphorical thinking, & objectivity and its alternatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

Intermediate course in the craft and art of fiction writing. Students read a diverse range of short stories and novel excerpts, complete writing exercises, and submit a short and longer story to be workshopped and revised. Prerequisite: 90 or 91. nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 190M: Intermediate Queer Stories

Intermediate Queer Stories is a workshop class open to any and all students, regardless of how they define their gender or sexuality. The goals of the class are to read widely in the canon of twentieth and twenty-first century queer prose literature, and to create work that draws on the styles, modes, and subjects of these writers. In the second half of the class, students will workshop a longer piece of their own writing that in some way draws upon the aesthetics or sensibilities of the writers we have read. This piece may be a short story, a personal essay, a chapter from a novel or memoir, or a piece that, in the spirit of queerness, blurs or interrogates standard demarcations of genre.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 190S: Short Story Salon

Who better to discuss a book with than its author? In this course we will immerse ourselves in eight short story collections and meet with many of the authors of these collections to hear about their experience drafting, revising, and sending their books out into the world. We will read as writers for inspiration and craft and analyze the collections for structure, character development, dialogue, setting, language, and theme. We will pay particular attention to the range, arrangement, and architecture of the story collection as a whole. How does a collection become greater than the sum of its parts? How does an author manage so many stops and starts? We will write about, discuss, and present the collections we read, participate in Q&A with visiting authors, and complete weekly in-class writing exercises designed to inform and inspire our own writing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 190SW: Screenwriting Intensive

The main requirement for this course is a full length film script. The course explores elements of screenwriting including beat structure, character creation, scene vs. montage, as well as description and dialogue. Students will read four to five screenplays during the first half of the course and then write a 90-page film script in the second half of the course. Students will additionally write synopses, treatments, character sketches, and beat sheets. Designed for any student who has always wanted to write a screenplay
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 190W: Contemporary Women Writers (FEMGEN 190W)

"Every word a woman writes changes the story of the world, revises the official version¿¿is this what sets contemporary women writers apart? How can we understand the relation between the radically unprecedented material such writers explore and ¿the official version¿? What do we find compelling in their challenging of structure, style, chronology, character? Our reading- and writing-intensive seminar will dig into the ways women writers confront, appropriate, subvert, or re-imagine convention, investigating, for example, current debate about the value of ¿dislikable¿ or ¿angry¿ women characters and their impact on readers. While pursuing such issues, you'll write a variety of both essayistic and fictional responses, each of which is designed to complicate and enlarge your creative and critical responsiveness and to spark ideas for your final project. By affirming risk-taking and originality throughout our quarter, seminar conversation will support gains in your close-reading practice and in articulating your views, including respectful dissent, in lively discourse¿in short, skills highly useful in a writer¿s existence. Our texts will come from various genres, including short stories, novels, essays, blog posts, reviews, memoir.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Tallent, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 191T: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Workshop. Special Topics continuation of 91. Focus is on forms of the essay. Works from across time and nationality for their craft and technique; experimentation with writing exercises. Students read and respond to each other's longer nonfiction projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 191V: Reading for Creative Non-Fiction Writers

Taught by the Stein Visiting Writer. Prerequisite English 90 or 91. Permission number required to enroll.nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Solnit, R. (PI)
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