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61 - 70 of 91 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 192PS: Poetry Salon

Have you ever wanted to talk to the author after reading a favorite book? In this course, we will read seven collections of poetry and host their poets to discuss the processes behind each collection. We will read deeply (at the level of the poem) and consider widely (the ambition and arrangement of a book) with a focus on craft. Students will also write poems, participate in Q&A with visiting poets, and produce a small chapbook of their own work by the end of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 194: Individual Research

See section above on Undergraduate Programs, Opportunities for Advanced Work, Individual Research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 197: Seniors Honors Essay

In two quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 198: Individual Work

Undergraduates who wish to study a subject or area not covered by regular courses may, with consent, enroll for individual work under the supervision of a member of the department. 198 may not be used to fulfill departmental area or elective requirements without consent. Group seminars are not appropriate for 198.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 199: Senior Independent Essay

Open, with department approval, to seniors majoring in non-Honors English who wish to work throughout the year on a 10,000 word critical or scholarly essay. Applicants submit a sample of their expository prose, proposed topic, and bibliography to the Director of Undergraduate Studies before preregistration in May of the junior year. Each student accepted is responsible for finding a department faculty adviser. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 222: Novels of Jane Austen

Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 224: Doing Literary History: Orwell in the World

¿Orwell in The World: Literature, Politics, History¿: This course will bring the disciplines of history and literary studies together by looking closely at the work of one major twentieth-century author: the British writer and political polemicist George Orwell. In 1946, Orwell writes, ¿What I have most wanted to do throughout the past ten years is to make political writing into an art.¿ In these years, Orwell writes about ¿ and often participates in or witnesses first-hand ¿ a series of major political events and crises. These include British imperialism in Burma, urban poverty in Europe, class inequality in England, the conflict between Socialism and Fascism in Spain, and the rise of totalitarianism in the Soviet Union. In engaging all of these events, Orwell experiments with different literary forms, moving bet ween fiction and non-fiction, novel and autobiography, essay and memoir, satire and fable, literature and journalism. Few writers demand such sustained and equal attention to text and context: in this course we will move back-and-forth between Orwell¿s varied writing and the urgent social and political contexts it addresses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 227: Melville's Moby-Dick

A slow and careful reading of Herman Melville's 1850 masterpiece, Moby-Dick; or, The Whale. In the process, we will unfold the novel's nineteenth-century literary-historical context as well as the world of Melville's own literary, religious, philosophical, technological, commercial, and scientific citations and allusions. We will seek to understand the multiple significances of Melville's experiments with the novelistic genre and their relationship with his building out the meaning of Americanness. In the second half of the quarter, we will focus on a selection of major mid-twentieth-century through contemporary critical, literary-theoretical, and political-theoretical readings of Moby-Dick.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 237: Before Novels

What is at stake when we identify ancient, medieval, or early modern works as proto-novelistic, especially when such texts encompass the wondrous, the mystical, the factual, and/or didactic? What do the ¿prosaic¿ dimensions of prose fiction disclose about our conceptions or history, truth, or reality? Readings for this course may include (in English translation where applicable) Lucian, A True History; Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe; Cervantes, Don Quixote; Nashe, The Unfortunate Traveller; Hooke, Micrographia; Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year; Austen, Persuasion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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