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21 - 30 of 54 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 143F: The Rise of the Food Memoir: 20th and 21st Century Perspectives

Marcel Proust eats a madeleine and remembers things past; M.F.K. Fisher evokes her childhood with the illicit taste of street tar; Bich Minh Nguyen recalls a red canister of Pringles in a cold Michigan house. What is it about food that lends itself so readily to the genre of the memoir? Beginning in the early 20th century and ending in the past decade, this course traces the development of the food memoir, its authors ranging from modernists to chef celebrities. As we read works by authors such as Ernest Hemingway, George Orwell, Madhur Jaffrey, Laura Esquivel, and Gabrielle Hamilton, we will consider issues of gender, race, and nationality, understanding the food memoir as situated somewhere at the intersection of ethnography and autobiography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ENGLISH 145J: The Jewish-American Novel: Diaspora, Privilege, Anxiety, Comedy (AMSTUD 145J, JEWISHST 155J)

Jews are sometimes referred to as ¿the people of the book.¿ Would Portnoy¿s Complaint count as a book that constitutes Jewish-American peoplehood? What about Fear of Flying? This seminar introduces students to influential Jewish-American novels (and some short stories and film) from the late nineteenth century to the present day. These works return time and again to questions of diaspora, race, queer social belonging, and the duty to a Jewish past, mythical or real. Through close readings of short stories and novels coupled with secondary readings about Jewish-American history and culture, we will explore how American Jewishness is constructed differently in changing historical climates. What makes a text Jewish? What do we mean by Jewish humor and Jewish seriousness? How do Jewish formulations of gender and power respond to Jews¿ entrance into the white American mainstream? As we read, we¿ll think through and elaborate on models of ethnicity, privilege, sexuality, and American pluralism. Authors include Cahan, Yezierska, Singer, Roth, Bellow, Malamud, Ozick, Mailer, Jong, and Englander.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

ENGLISH 159A: Literature that Changed the World (AFRICAAM 159A, CSRE 159I)

How does literary art get involved in politics? What is the border between propaganda and art? This class examines moments when writers seem suddenly not only to represent politically charged topics and themes, but to have a part in bringing about political change. We¿ll look at case studies from the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, the American Civil Rights struggle, 19th century Russia, and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory (COMPLIT 161E)

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 162W: Writing Intensive Seminar in English (WISE)

In these highly regarded, small-group seminars, students explore unique topics in English language literature, reading select primary texts alongside exemplary critical works and/or other cultural artifacts, while also honing their research and writing skills through series of assignments that culminate in a substantial original research essay. Classes are capped at 8, allowing for individualized attention and rich feedback. 2019-2020 course topics include: African American author-critics; Asian encounters in American literature; queer drama of the AIDS crisis; Elizabeth Bishop and 20th century poetry; Shakespeare and Marx; dialogue and narrative theory; the politics of ¿bad reading¿; and protest literature. Click ¿Schedule¿ below to see individual course titles (in Notes). For fuller descriptions, go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise. Enrollment is by permission. English majors must take at least one WISE to fulfill WIM. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 163D: Shakespeare: The Ethical Challenge (TAPS 163D)

Was the eighteenth century right in proclaiming Shakespeare to be the greatest moral philosopher? What are the ethical challenges Shakespeare's major plays still pose for us? Can we divorce ethical decisions from the contingencies of experience? We will ask a series of normative ethical questions (to do with pleasure, power, old age, self-sacrifice, and truth telling) and attempt to answer them in relation to the dramatic situation of Shakespeare's characters on the one hand and our own cultural situation on the other. The ethical challenge of Shakespearean drama will be set against selected readings in ethical theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

ENGLISH 165: Perspectives on American Identity (AMSTUD 160)

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 182E: Photography in Fiction

Since its invention in the early 19th century, photography has found countless documentary and artistic applications. As an art form, it is not only a medium of its own, but one which has entered into fascinating dialogue with other media, from film to dance. Perhaps nowhere has photography been put to such intriguing multimedia use as in fiction. Since the early 20thcentury, authors as diverse as Virginia Woolf, German novelist W.G. Sebald, and the contemporary Sri-Lankan-Canadian writer Michael Ondaatje, have deployed photographs throughout their texts. In this course, we will look at this literary tradition, exploring the way that text and image enter into a complex dance, at times enhancing narrative, at times troubling it. What can we make of these strange and wonderful hybrids? What place do images have in traditional narratives? What are the ethics of such work in an age in which the technological distinction between truth and fiction is becoming ever more blurred? As we read (and look), we will find ourselves not only drawn into the narratives themselves, but sent beyond them, into questions of history, gender, trauma, and memory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 184E: Literary Text Mining

This course will train students in applied methods for computationally analyzing texts for humanities research. The skills students will gain will include basic programming for textual analysis, applied statistical evaluation of results and the ability to present these results within a formal research paper or presentation. Students in the course will also learn the prerequisite steps of such an analysis including corpus selection and cleaning, metadata collection, and selecting and creating an appropriate visualization for the results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Fredner, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 187C: The Evolution of the Feminist First-Person Essay, 2000-present (FEMGEN 187C)

The internet age has coincided with the rise of new and reinvented modes of nonfiction writing by women online. The feminist first-person essay (what simply goes by ¿personal essay¿ in the business) has transformed internet writing formally, politically, and economically. The explosion in popularity and shareability of this nonfiction subgenre has generated a host of new media and catapulted a new coterie of women writers into prominence. Which authors have exerted the most influence upon this new subgenre, how does the emergence of the first-person essay by women signify a mainstreaming of feminist dialectic, and how has this emergence been received by both a popular readership and the media establishment?nThis course will investigate how the growth of the feminist first-person essay has promoted new publications and modes of publication. It will trace the genesis of the online personal essay genre from public journals like LiveJournal, Blogspot, and Tumblr, via its codification in on more »
The internet age has coincided with the rise of new and reinvented modes of nonfiction writing by women online. The feminist first-person essay (what simply goes by ¿personal essay¿ in the business) has transformed internet writing formally, politically, and economically. The explosion in popularity and shareability of this nonfiction subgenre has generated a host of new media and catapulted a new coterie of women writers into prominence. Which authors have exerted the most influence upon this new subgenre, how does the emergence of the first-person essay by women signify a mainstreaming of feminist dialectic, and how has this emergence been received by both a popular readership and the media establishment?nThis course will investigate how the growth of the feminist first-person essay has promoted new publications and modes of publication. It will trace the genesis of the online personal essay genre from public journals like LiveJournal, Blogspot, and Tumblr, via its codification in online publications like The Toast, The Rumpus, Gawker, Jezebel, Guernica, The Hairpin, The Awl, and xoJane, to its eventual breakthrough into established newspapers, magazines, and traditionally published memoirs and essay collections. The course will include visits (or virtual drop-ins) from some central figures in this story, be they essayists, critics or editors.nWe will investigate questions like: What is the first person¿s effect, and affect, in interspersing an author¿s personal experience, and what feminist potential does it contain? How does the myth of journalistic ¿objectivity¿ conflict with the presentation of the first person, and how has this objectivity myth descended from patriarchal tropes of legitimation? What do the terms ¿confessional¿ and ¿silence-breaking¿ connote? How has social media simultaneously empowered these new modes of public feminist dialogue and also exposed feminist public intellectuals to alarming levels of harassment and abuse? How successfully has the personal essay subgenre acted in de-centering hegemonic identity structures including whiteness, class privilege, and heterosexuality? What role has the feminist first-person essay played in the emergence of heavily digitized political movements including Black Lives Matter and #MeToo?nWhat is ¿trauma porn¿, and how does it interface with the capitalistic structures of the first person essay economy; what problems arise when capitalism and confessionalism intersect?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Goode, L. (PI)
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