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11 - 20 of 54 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter). NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 90M: Queer Stories (FEMGEN 90M)

Like other 90 and 91-level courses, 90M will explore basic elements of fiction and nonfiction writing. Students will read a wide variety of stories and essays in order to develop a language for working through the themes, forms, and concerns of the queer prose canon. Students will complete and workshop a piece of writing that in some way draws upon the aesthetics or sensibilities of the work we have read, culled from exercises completed throughout the quarter. This final piece may be a short story, a personal essay, a chapter from a novel or memoir, or a piece that, in the spirit of queerness, blurs or interrogates standard demarcations of genre. The course is open to any and all students, regardless of how they define their gender or sexuality. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 90Q: Sports Writing

Study and practice of the unique narratives, tropes, images and arguments that creative writers develop when they write about popular sport. From regional fandom to individualist adventuring, boxing and baseball to mascot dancing and table tennis, exceptional creative writers mine from a diversity of leisure activity a rich vein of ¿sports writing¿ in the creative nonfiction genre. In doing so, they demonstrate the creative and formal adaptability required to write with excellence about any subject matter, and under the circumstances of any subjectivity. Discussion of the ways in which writers have framed, and even critiqued, our interest in athletic events, spectatorship, and athletic beauty. Writers include Joyce Carol Oates, Roland Barthes, David James Duncan, Arnold Rampersad, John Updike, Maxine Kumin, Susan Sterling, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Dervla Murphy, Haruki Murakami, Don DeLillo, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Annie Dillard, John McPhee, and Laura Hillenbrand. Close readings of essays on form and sport, as well as book excerpts. Students will engage in class discussions and write short weekly papers, leading to a more comprehensive project at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter and for SLE students). NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 105E: Early Medieval English Poetry

This course introduces students to the earliest recorded poems of the English medieval period. Material in this course will range from the seventh through to the end of the fourteenth century and will include a variety of poetic genres: epic and elegy, lyric and lament, riddle and romance, and more. We will encounter heroes, saints, lovers, mourners and monsters. Students will conduct close readings of individual works as well as situate poems in broader historical and literary contexts. Additionally, the readings are selected to showcase the development of the English language as it transitioned between Old and Middle English as well as shifting cultural influences from within Britain to medieval Europe more broadly. Sample texts: Cædmon¿s Hymn, Beowulf, Dream of the Rood, Exodus, Sir Orfeo, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Quick, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 108A: Intro to Disability Studies: Disability and Technology (HUMBIO 178A)

For a long time, disability studies has focused on the past, early representations of people with disabilities and histories of the movement for disability rights. This course turns toward the future, looking at activism and speculative fiction as critical vehicles for change. Drawing on fiction by Samuel Beckett, Muriel Rukeyser, and Octavia Butler, this course will address the question of the future through an interrogation of the relationship between disability and technology, including assistive technology, genetic testing, organ transplantation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Kantor, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 113: 'The secret of deep human sympathy': Great Victorian Novels

The Victorian period is often referred to as the Age of the Novel: never before or since did fiction play such a central part in the English literary landscape. Through a close scrutiny of works by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy, this course will probe the formal innovations of four major nineteenth-century writers. Each novel will be tackled through five main approaches: the contexts that informed the work (such as the development of London, evolving attitudes towards criminality, subjectivity, childhood, and biology); the impact of publication methods on the novel (Oliver Twist and Tess of the d¿Urbervilles originally appeared in periodicals as, respectively, a monthly and a weekly serial; Jane Eyre and Adam Bede were first published as three-volume novels); innovations with narrative voice (for example how the novelists make use of third-person omniscient and first-person narration, and how and why they address the reader); the novels¿ stylistic par more »
The Victorian period is often referred to as the Age of the Novel: never before or since did fiction play such a central part in the English literary landscape. Through a close scrutiny of works by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy, this course will probe the formal innovations of four major nineteenth-century writers. Each novel will be tackled through five main approaches: the contexts that informed the work (such as the development of London, evolving attitudes towards criminality, subjectivity, childhood, and biology); the impact of publication methods on the novel (Oliver Twist and Tess of the d¿Urbervilles originally appeared in periodicals as, respectively, a monthly and a weekly serial; Jane Eyre and Adam Bede were first published as three-volume novels); innovations with narrative voice (for example how the novelists make use of third-person omniscient and first-person narration, and how and why they address the reader); the novels¿ stylistic particularities (from their manipulation of imagery to their experimentation with genre); and the major critical debates surrounding them (such as recent discussions concerning the extent to which the Victorian novel consolidated or challenged nineteenth-century values). Throughnour four novels, we will span the Victorian period, from Queen Victoria¿s arrival on the throne to anxieties and experimentations of the fin-de-siècle.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ENGLISH 117B:  Environmental and Animal Masterpieces

Works of nonfiction or fiction notable for their social influence as well as their intellectual and aesthetic power; books might include Walden, My First Summer in the Sierra, Green Acres, A Sand County Almanac, Silent Spring, Desert Solitaire, The Omnivore's Dilemma, The World Without Us, Black Beauty, or others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Greif, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 121D: ¿Hard¿ Science Fiction

What makes hard science fiction ¿hard¿? What's the science? What's the fiction? And why do we care about the difference? nIn this course, we will investigate different traditions of hard science fiction, trace the interactions between ¿real¿ science and science fiction, and consider the scientific education and outreach potential of hard science fiction. We will read, watch, and play hard science fiction that draws on a number of domains: physics, data science, linguistics, biology, politics, and others. Course texts will include works by Ted Chiang & Carl Sagan, episodes of Star Trek, and fan reviews & commentary. We will conclude the course by thinking about the relationship between science fiction, academia, and literary prestige¿asking questions about why, how, and to whom this genre matters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Nomura, N. (PI)
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