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11 - 19 of 19 results for: ENERGY 171

CHEMENG 432: Electrochemical Energy Conversion

Electrochemistry is playing an increasingly important role in renewable energy. This course aims to cover the fundamentals of electrochemistry, and then build on that knowledge to cover applications of electrochemistry in energy conversion. Topics to be covered include fuel cells, solar water-splitting, CO2 conversion to fuels and chemicals, batteries, redox flow cells, and supercapacitors. Prerequisites: CHEM 31AB or 31 X, CHEM 33, CHEM 171, CHEM 175 or CHEMENG 170, or equivalents. Recommended: CHEM 173.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ENERGY 171: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 271)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GES 267: Solution-Mineral Equilibria: Theory

Procedures for calculating and evaluating the thermodynamic properties of reversible and irreversible reactions among rock-forming minerals and aqueous solutions in geologic systems. Emphasis is on the generation and utility of phase diagrams depicting solution-mineral interaction relevant to phase relations associated with weathering diagenetic, hydrothermal, and metamorphic processes, and the prediction of temperature, pressure, and the chemical potential of thermodynamic components compatible with observed mineralogic phase relations in geologic outcrops. Individual research topics. Prerequisite: 171.
Last offered: Winter 2006

MATSCI 161: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 171)

From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spec more »
From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). The course will finish with students giving presentations on the prospects of using dynamic windows and generic radiation control in cars, homes, commercial buildings or airplanes. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 171: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 161)

From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spec more »
From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). The course will finish with students giving presentations on the prospects of using dynamic windows and generic radiation control in cars, homes, commercial buildings or airplanes. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

PHYSICS 172: Solid State Physics (APPPHYS 272)

Introduction to the properties of solids. Crystal structures and bonding in materials. Momentum-space analysis and diffraction probes. Lattice dynamics, phonon theory and measurements, thermal properties. Electronic structure theory, classical and quantum; free, nearly-free, and tight-binding limits. Electron dynamics and basic transport properties; quantum oscillations. Properties and applications of semiconductors. Reduced-dimensional systems. Undergraduates should register for PHYSICS 172 and graduate students for APPPHYS 272. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 170 and PHYSICS 171, or equivalents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kivelson, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 268: Physics with Neutrinos

Relativistic fermions, Weyl and Dirac equations, Majorana masses. Electroweak theory, neutrino cross sections, neutrino refraction in matter, MSW effect. Three-flavor oscillations, charge-parity violation, searches for sterile neutrinos, modern long- and short-baseline oscillation experiments. Seesaw mechanism, models of neutrino masses, lepton flavor violation. Neutrinoless double beta decay. Cosmological constraints on neutrino properties. Advanced topics, such as collective oscillations in supernovae or ultrahigh energy neutrinos, offered as optional projects. The material in this course is largely complementary to PHYS 269, focusing on particle physics aspects of neutrinos. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 121, 131 and 171 or equivalent. PHYS 230-231, 269, 152 and 161 or equivalent are helpful, but not required.
Last offered: Spring 2019

PHYSICS 269: Neutrinos in Astrophysics and Cosmology

Basic neutrino properties. Flavor evolution in vacuum and in matter. Oscillations of atmospheric, reactor and beam neutrinos. Measurements of solar neutrinos; physics of level-crossing and the resolution of the solar neutrino problem. Roles of neutrinos in stellar evolution; bounds from stellar cooling. Neutrinos and stellar collapse; energy transport, collective flavor oscillations, neutrino flavor in turbulent medium. Ultra-high-energy neutrinos. The cosmic neutrino background, its impact on the cosmic microwave background and structure formation; cosmological bounds on the neutrino sector. Prerequisites/corerequisites: PHYSICS 121, 131 and 171 or equivalent. PHYS 230-231, 152 and 161 or equivalent are helpful, but not required. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

PHYSICS 470: Topics in Modern Condensed Matter Theory I: Many Body Quantum Dynamics

Many body quantum systems can display rich emergent dynamical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium, whose understanding represents an exciting frontier of research at the interface of condensed matter, statistical physics, high energy theory and quantum information. This course is intended to serve as an introduction to this active research area, assuming only a knowledge of quantum mechanics and statistical physics. Topics covered include: quantum thermalization, many-body localization, quantum entanglement and its dynamics, tensor network methods, dynamical quantum phases and phase transitions, and Floquet theory. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 113, PHYSICS 130, PHYSICS 131, PHYSICS 170, and PHYSICS 171.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Khemani, V. (PI)
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