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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

21 - 30 of 34 results for: EMED ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EMED 222: BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience (BIOE 122, EMED 122, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promi more »
Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promising technologies for pandemic response and resilience, and other relevant topics. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, public health leaders, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. Additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 231: Peer Mentoring for Medical and MSPA Students

This course meets for 5 total sessions, and covers topics including compassionate listening, problem solving, understanding imposter syndromes, role of emotions in decision making, implicit bias training, professionalism, and ethics and boundaries. Students will engage in dedicated interactive sessions to prepare them for common scenarios and potential approaches for resolution. Faculty mentors from the Office of Medical Student Wellness, Counseling and Psychological Services staff at the Vaden Health Center, and Ear4Peer (E4P) upperclass student team leaders will collaborate each week to lead the sessions. Students will also receive training on campus resources and appropriate channels for referring peers to professional services. This course is a pre-requisite for students interested in becoming an E4P. Prerequisites: Must be a currently enrolled medical or PA student
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 1 times (up to 3 units total)

EMED 244: On the Path to Medical School

Student lead: This is a course for all prospective pre-medical students, including undergraduate and graduate students, who seek knowledge and guidance on their path to medical school, with an opt-in component to work alongside (remotely during Covid-19) doctors in the Emergency Room at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Discussions, presentations, and lectures will help students discover how to integrate service with pursuing medicine, whether the pre-medical path is right for them, and if so, how best to navigate the pre-med requirements. In addition, in collaboration with physician advisors and medical students, we have designed a series of presentations on topics including strategically approaching pre-medical classes and extracurriculars, studying for the MCAT, optimizing the medical school application, preparing for medical school interviews, and evidence-based pros and cons of careers in medicine and differences between specialties. This course is a one-stop-shop for getting all more »
Student lead: This is a course for all prospective pre-medical students, including undergraduate and graduate students, who seek knowledge and guidance on their path to medical school, with an opt-in component to work alongside (remotely during Covid-19) doctors in the Emergency Room at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Discussions, presentations, and lectures will help students discover how to integrate service with pursuing medicine, whether the pre-medical path is right for them, and if so, how best to navigate the pre-med requirements. In addition, in collaboration with physician advisors and medical students, we have designed a series of presentations on topics including strategically approaching pre-medical classes and extracurriculars, studying for the MCAT, optimizing the medical school application, preparing for medical school interviews, and evidence-based pros and cons of careers in medicine and differences between specialties. This course is a one-stop-shop for getting all the information needed to become an efficient, successful pre-medical student while also gaining clinical experience as students consider whether medicine is right for them and navigate the path to medical school. Currently, to our knowledge, there are no classes directly targeted towards guiding students at every stage of the premed path in this way while also providing an active volunteer learning experience, and yet pre-meds are among the largest group of pre-professional students at Stanford. Due to COVID, our active volunteer component is on hold for the summer. Must be a member of SCOPE, please apply at https://scope.beagooddoctor.org/apply/
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Weiss, E. (PI)

EMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Emergency Medicine

Provides an observational experience in an emergency medicine specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 299: Directed Reading in Emergency Medicine

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 301A: Emergency Medicine Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: The clinical patient care components of this clerkship involves pairing the student, in both the Adult as well a Pediatric Emergency Department, with a senior Emergency Medicine resident, with the supervision of the Emergency Medicine Attending. The Emergency Department (ED) is a unique learning environment as patients often present undifferentiated. Through this exposure, medical students will develop an understanding of the initial approach, management, and treatment of the undifferentiated patient. Students will perform complaint-directed history and physical exams, develop an appropriate differential diagnosis, initiate management, and determine disposition of these patients. Students will work a mixture of days, evenings, overnights, weekends and holidays as part of their 3 week rotations. In addition to the shift work (approximately 10-12) they will participate in didactics, web based learning, simulation exercises and case presentations. The final exam is a multiple choice written exam. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Moises Gallegos, M.D., moisesg@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso, 650-497-6702, malfonso@stanford.edu and Kristen Kayser, 650-497-3058, kkayser@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: The students are notified prior to the first day of the clerkship; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Emergency Dept. Faculty. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5

EMED 308A: Bedside Ultrasound Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Point of care ultrasound (POCUS) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This rotation is designed to introduce bedside ultrasound to the clinical medical student and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with bedside US for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in the emergency room or on the floors with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. A goal for a minimum number of ultrasound scans will be 25 per applic more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Point of care ultrasound (POCUS) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This rotation is designed to introduce bedside ultrasound to the clinical medical student and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with bedside US for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in the emergency room or on the floors with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. A goal for a minimum number of ultrasound scans will be 25 per application including, eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. Other advanced ultrasound applications will also be introduced (Testicular, airway, bladder, nerve blocks). Students will obtain US images in the Stanford emergency department and will have imaging formally reviewed by an US fellowship trained emergency medicine faculty. Images will be obtained during scan shifts during which students will scan appropriate patients and review images with the faculty member onsite. Students will attend Bedside US didactics offered by an US EM faculty member every Thursday morning, followed by quality assessment (QA) review of Ultrasound scans performed in the ED. Students will have access and be expected to participate in online and computer based learning that will be provided for them as well. A multiple choice test will be given at the end of the rotation. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 4-16, full time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Dr. Nick Ashenburg, ashenburg@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Kendra Lee Stahl, 650-723-6576. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 2. OTHER FACULTY: K. Anderson, Y. Duanmu, V. Lobo, M. Askgar. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

EMED 313A: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Overall Description: During this 3-week, dual-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients at the new, state of the art Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC). Students will also be paired with a faculty coach in order to maximize educational opportunities and feedback over the three weeks. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of these clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work 10-11, 8-hour clinical shifts during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complain more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Overall Description: During this 3-week, dual-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients at the new, state of the art Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC). Students will also be paired with a faculty coach in order to maximize educational opportunities and feedback over the three weeks. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of these clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work 10-11, 8-hour clinical shifts during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complaint-directed history and physical exam, developing a focused differential diagnosis, and then designing and implementing a targeted care plan with input and support from the attending physician. Students will also learn essential communication skills, acting as the primary contact between the care team, patients, patient's families, consultants and hospital staff. Educational Curriculum: Throughout the rotation, students will have access to a number of supporting educational events outside of the emergency department. Students will attend weekly core curriculum conference with the Stanford Emergency Medicine residents, as well as a monthly journal club. Rotators will also have dedicated, student oriented educational sessions focused on bedside ultrasound, laceration repair, orthopedic injury management, and ECG interpretation, as well as a series of interactive, faculty-led, case discussions. A student-only simulation experience held at Stanford's innovative Center for Immersive and Simulation Based Learning early in the rotation will help faculty and students develop specific learning plans. The rotation culminates in a final written exam. Visiting students ONLY accepted periods 1-8, 16, pre-approval is required only for visiting students (PLEASE NOTE: **Due to policies around COVID-19, we will not be taking visiting students in the 2020-2021 academic year.**Pre-approval dates: Periods 1-4 (March 19-23), Period 4-8 (June 19-23), and Period 16 (December 1-5). Please contact clerkship coordinator Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu) to inquire about pre approval process and materials needed for submission. PREREQUISITES: Completed all core clerkships in medicine, surgery, OB/GYN, and pediatrics. Stanford medical students must complete MED 313A. Exceptions only at the discretion of the clerkship director on a case by case basis. PERIODS AVAILABLE: Periods 1-8 and 15-16 only for 2020-21, Periods 1-8 and 16 only. Closed Periods 9-15 for 2021-22. Full-time for 3 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: William Dixon, MD at wdixon@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 900 Welch Road Suite 350; Time: TBA. Coordinator will email details one week prior to the first day of the rotation block. CALL CODE: 2 (No call, but a mixture of at least 3 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block.) OTHER FACULTY: Emergency Dept. Faculty. LOCATION: SUMC, KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

EMED 313D: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 3 week rotation consists of 10 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 10 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM attending staff physician. Students should present each patient upon completing history and physical examination in a timely fashion. EM residents will give daily informal lectures at 4pm, which students are encouraged to attend when on s more »
VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 3 week rotation consists of 10 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 10 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM attending staff physician. Students should present each patient upon completing history and physical examination in a timely fashion. EM residents will give daily informal lectures at 4pm, which students are encouraged to attend when on shift. PREREQUISITES: Surgery 300A, Medicine 300A, Obstetrics & Gynecology 300A and Pediatric 300A, passing score USMLE I (and II if taken) on first attempt. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. No students may be added less than 3 weeks prior to the start of each rotation. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Alice Chao, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Susan Krause, 408-851-3836. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: GME office, Homestead Medical Office Building at 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5
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