2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

21 - 30 of 35 results for: EMED ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EMED 212B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112B)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, Stanford's EMT training course.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 214: Yoga and Wellness for Bioscience and Medical Students

The class will consist of one hour of beginner friendly yoga practice followed by one hour of discussion over a light meal. Students will learn and practice yoga techniques and health practices for managing mental and emotional stressors. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of stress, how anxiety manifests int he body and mind, and yoga techniques for relief. This course will include yoga instruction, readings related to yoga and bioscience research/patient care outcomes, and student participation to enable students to: (1) acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. MD and BioScience graduate students have priority for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 216: Point-Of-Care Ultrasound

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This course is designed to introduce POCUS to the preclinical medical student, and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with POCUS for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in any acute setting with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. Applications taught will include eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. During the hands-on session, students w more »
Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This course is designed to introduce POCUS to the preclinical medical student, and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with POCUS for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in any acute setting with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. Applications taught will include eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. During the hands-on session, students will serve as model volunteers to be scanned, as well as scan their peers. Students will also have the optional opportunity to participate in scan shifts in the main emergency department when POCUS EM faculty perform ¿scan¿ rounds. Students will have access and be expected to participate in online and computer based learning that will be provided for them as well.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Lobo, V. (PI)

EMED 222: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (BIOE 122, EMED 122, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 227: Health Care Leadership (EMED 127, PUBLPOL 127, PUBLPOL 227)

Healthcare Leadership class brings eminent healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia, biotechnology companies and other health care organizations. The class will also familiarize the students with the healthcare industry, as well as introduce concepts and skills relevant to healthcare leadership. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Students taking the course Mondays and Wednesdays should enroll for 4 units (exceptions for a 3 unit registration can be made with the consent of instructor to be still eligible for Ways credit). Students taking the course on Wednesdays only should register for 2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 234: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health (EMED 134)

Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing all subsequent generations of patients and physicians. This nweekly lunch seminar aims to introduce medical trainees to a variety of climate change topics and advanced clinical nskills specific to climate change. Course content will cover climate and disease, sustainable medicine, and advocacy. The course will feature speakers who are leaders in this emerging domain and patient perspectives of climate change. Each class session is designed to be interactive, with a mix of didactic lecture and small group discussion. Optional study materials will supplement each weekly topic for further study. Lunch provided for enrolled students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Emergency Medicine

Provides an observational experience in an emergency medicine specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Albanese, C. (PI) ; Auerbach, P. (PI) ; Barrett, B. (PI) ; Bonham, C. (PI) ; Bresler, M. (PI) ; Bruzoni, M. (PI) ; Busque, S. (PI) ; Chang, J. (PI) ; Chase, R. (PI) ; Concepcion, W. (PI) ; Curtin, C. (PI) ; D'Souza, P. (PI) ; Dalman, R. (PI) ; Dannenberg, B. (PI) ; Dirbas, F. (PI) ; Duriseti, R. (PI) ; Dutta, S. (PI) ; Eisenberg, D. (PI) ; Emond, S. (PI) ; Esquivel, C. (PI) ; Ferguson, I. (PI) ; Fuchs, J. (PI) ; Garmel, G. (PI) ; Gharahbaghian, L. (PI) ; Gilbert, G. (PI) ; Girod, S. (PI) ; Gosling, J. (PI) ; Govindarajan, P. (PI) ; Greco, R. (PI) ; Gregg, D. (PI) ; Gurtner, G. (PI) ; Harris, E. (PI) ; Harter, P. (PI) ; Hartman, G. (PI) ; Helms, J. (PI) ; Hentz, R. (PI) ; Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI) ; Jeffrey, S. (PI) ; Kahn, D. (PI) ; Khosla, R. (PI) ; Klofas, E. (PI) ; Krams, S. (PI) ; Krummel, T. (PI) ; Lau, J. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Leeper, N. (PI) ; Lin, J. (PI) ; Lipman, G. (PI) ; Longaker, M. (PI) ; Lorenz, H. (PI) ; Maggio, P. (PI) ; Mahadevan, S. (PI) ; Martinez, O. (PI) ; Melcher, M. (PI) ; Mell, M. (PI) ; Morton, J. (PI) ; Mueller, C. (PI) ; Murphy, K. (PI) ; Norris, R. (PI) ; Norton, J. (PI) ; Oberhelman, H. (PI) ; Perera, P. (PI) ; Poultsides, G. (PI) ; Quinn, J. (PI) ; Raphael, E. (PI) ; Rhoads, K. (PI) ; Rivas, H. (PI) ; Ryan, J. (PI) ; Salvatierra, O. (PI) ; Schendel, S. (PI) ; Schreiber, D. (PI) ; Shelton, A. (PI) ; Shen, S. (PI) ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI) ; So, S. (PI) ; Spain, D. (PI) ; Srivastava, S. (PI) ; Staudenmayer, K. (PI) ; Sternbach, G. (PI) ; Strehlow, M. (PI) ; Sylvester, K. (PI) ; Taleghani, N. (PI) ; Trounce, M. (PI) ; Visser, B. (PI) ; Wan, D. (PI) ; Wang, N. (PI) ; Wapnir, I. (PI) ; Weiss, E. (PI) ; Welton, M. (PI) ; Whitmore, I. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Wren, S. (PI) ; Yang, G. (PI) ; Yang, S. (PI) ; Zafren, K. (PI) ; Zarins, C. (PI) ; Zhou, W. (PI)

EMED 299: Directed Reading in Emergency Medicine

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 308A: Bedside Ultrasound Clerkship

Open to visitors. Diagnostic bedside ultrasound (US) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This rotation is designed to introduce bedside ultrasound to the clinical medical student, and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with bedside US for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in the emergency room or on the floors with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. A goal for a minimum number of ultrasound scans will be 25 per application including, eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. Other advanced ultrasound applications will also be introduced (Testicular, airway, bladder, nerve blocks). Students will obtain US images in the Stanford emergency department and will have all imaging formally reviewed by an US fellowship trained emergency medicine faculty. Images will be obtained during work shifts, when one of the US EM faculty are working in the ED, during when students will scan appropriate patients and review images with the faculty member onsite. They will also have scan shifts, when an US EM faculty will teach/scan with the student in the emergency department, this is a 1:1 session. Students will attend Bedside US didactics offered by an US EM faculty member every Thursday morning, followed by 4 hours of QA review of Ultrasound scans performed in the ED. Students will have access and be expected to participate in online and computer based learning that will be provided for them as well. A multiple choice test will be given at the end of the rotation. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. Dr. Nick Ashenburg ashenburg@stanford.edu. Prereq: Complete pre-clinical training. Periods Avail: 3-12 for 2 or 4 weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Deborah Kimball, M.D. Other Faculty: K. Anderson, L. Gharahbaghian, V. Lobo, P. Perera, C. Poffenberger, and S. Williams. nCoord: Hienock Habte (650-736-8842), habte@stanford.edu (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6

EMED 313A: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Overall Description: During this 4-week, dual-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients in two unique emergency department settings: Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), and the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center (KPMC). At each of these sites, rotators will work directly with an emergency medicine attending. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of these clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work thirteen 8-hour clinical shifts (10 at SUMC, and 3 at KPMC) during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patie more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. Overall Description: During this 4-week, dual-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients in two unique emergency department settings: Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), and the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center (KPMC). At each of these sites, rotators will work directly with an emergency medicine attending. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of these clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work thirteen 8-hour clinical shifts (10 at SUMC, and 3 at KPMC) during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complaint-directed history and physical exam, developing a focused differential diagnosis, and then designing and implementing a targeted care plan with input and support from the attending physician. Students will also learn essential communication skills, acting as the primary contact between the care team, patients, patient's families, consultants and hospital staff. Educational Curriculum: Throughout the rotation, students will have access to a number of supporting educational events outside of the emergency department. Students will attend weekly core curriculum conference with the Stanford Emergency Medicine residents, as well as a monthly journal club. Rotators will also have dedicated, student oriented educational sessions focused on bedside ultrasound, laceration repair, orthopedic injury management, and ECG interpretation, as well as a series of interactive, faculty-led, case discussions. The rotation culminates in a final written exam and an immersive, student-only simulation session held at Stanford¿s innovative Center for Immersive and Simulation Based Learning. Stanford students who want to do a clinical based rotation at Stanford site during Periods 7-11, please contact coordinator at malfonso@stanford.edu to coordinate enrollment in Emed 398A. Visiting students ONLY accepted periods 12-6, pre-approval is required only for visiting students for periods 12-6. Pre-approval dates are as follows: Periods 1-3 (March 19-23), Period 4-6 (June 19-23), and Period 12 (December 1-5). Please contact clerkship coordinator Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu) to inquire about pre approval process and materials needed for submission. Prereq: All students must have completed core clerkships in medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn and pediatrics are required. Stanford medical students must also have completed MED 313A. Exceptions only at the discretion of the clerkship director, on a case by cases basis. Periods Avail: Periods 12-6 only. Closed Periods 7-11. Full-time for four weeks. Visiting students and Stanford students accepted periods 12-6 only. Maximum 12 students per period. No adjustments in dates. No students may be added less than three weeks prior to start of each rotation. Reporting Instructions: Where: 900 Welch Road Suite 350; Time: Coordinator will email details one week prior to the first day of the rotation block. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the 2 different sites. Units: 6. Call Code: 2 (No call, but a mixture of at least 3 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block) Director: Nounou Taleghani, M.D., Ph.D. at nounou@stanford.edu. Other Faculty: Emergency Dept Faculty. Coord: Maria Alfonso (650-497-6702), malfonso@stanford.edu (SUMC, KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints