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11 - 20 of 22 results for: EMED

EMED 211C: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111C)

Continuation of EMED 111B/211B. Topics include mass casualty incidents, vehicle extrication, pediatric and obstetrical emergencies. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first week of class. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission, see EMED 211C.) Prerequisites: EMED 111A/211A, 111B/211C and consent of instructor, AHA or RC CPR certification.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 212C: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112C)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including leadership of MCIs, vehicle extrication, and obstetric and pediatric emergencies. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the Stanford EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 214: Yoga and Wellness for Bioscience and Medical Students

The class will consist of one hour of beginner friendly yoga practice followed by one hour of discussion over a light meal. Students will learn and practice yoga techniques and health practices for managing mental and emotional stressors. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of stress, how anxiety manifests int he body and mind, and yoga techniques for relief. This course will include yoga instruction, readings related to yoga and bioscience research/patient care outcomes, and student participation to enable students to: (1) acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. MD and BioScience graduate students have priority for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 219: Catalyst For Change: Emergency Response Systems in India

This course will cover the basics of health care access and infrastructure in India, with a focus on emergency care and response. We will review principles of community engagement and social emergency medicine with in the India context, using maternal/child health and gender-based violence as case studies. Students participating in the course will be research assistants in the summer, as such, we will spend some classes reviewing project logistics, research protocols, and research ethics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Newberry, J. (PI)

EMED 223: Advanced Wilderness Medicine

Open to all students. Wilderness-related illnesses and injuries; a framework for evaluation and treatment of emergencies in the backcountry. Hands-on clinical skills. Topics include high altitude medicine, hypothermia, envenomations, search and rescue, improvisation, and a day long field trip for hands-on field work. 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 228: Virtual Reality Storytelling

Do you have a story to tell? Would you like to make an impact on medicine through the most immersive medium available? Virtual reality 360 filmmaking is a cutting edge means of shaping the public's perception of and relationship to healthcare, with enormous potential to act as a vehicle for change. This course will describe and practice the entire 360 video virtual reality filmmaking process from preproduction and production through to postproduction completion. Step by step you will learn to tell stories that matter in this immersive medium. When the quarter is complete, there will be a complete virtual reality experience for you to share. No prior virtual reality or filmmaking experience required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 235: Wilderness Leadership and Mentorship Skills for Medical and PA Students

For MD/Master of Medicine wilderness pre-orientation trip (SWEAT) leaders and MSPA pre-orientation camping trip leaders. Training to engage with and prepare incoming first-year medical students and MSPA students for the rigors of their respective programs. Topics include: fundamentals of wilderness survival, wilderness equipment use, camping, outdoor leadership, mentorship, team building, problem-solving, risk management, cultural competency, professionalism as a physician, reflection and resiliency, first-year curricula, stress management and coping. Guest lectures from Stanford faculty and advisors, emergency medicine physicians, outdoor education specialists, and mental health personnel.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Emergency Medicine

Provides an observational experience in an emergency medicine specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: Albanese, C. (PI) ; Auerbach, P. (PI) ; Barrett, B. (PI) ; Bonham, C. (PI) ; Bresler, M. (PI) ; Bruzoni, M. (PI) ; Busque, S. (PI) ; Chang, J. (PI) ; Chase, R. (PI) ; Concepcion, W. (PI) ; Curtin, C. (PI) ; D'Souza, P. (PI) ; Dalman, R. (PI) ; Dannenberg, B. (PI) ; Dirbas, F. (PI) ; Duriseti, R. (PI) ; Dutta, S. (PI) ; Eisenberg, D. (PI) ; Emond, S. (PI) ; Esquivel, C. (PI) ; Ferguson, I. (PI) ; Fuchs, J. (PI) ; Garmel, G. (PI) ; Gharahbaghian, L. (PI) ; Gilbert, G. (PI) ; Girod, S. (PI) ; Gosling, J. (PI) ; Govindarajan, P. (PI) ; Greco, R. (PI) ; Gregg, D. (PI) ; Gurtner, G. (PI) ; Harris, E. (PI) ; Harter, P. (PI) ; Hartman, G. (PI) ; Helms, J. (PI) ; Hentz, R. (PI) ; Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI) ; Jeffrey, S. (PI) ; Kahn, D. (PI) ; Khosla, R. (PI) ; Klofas, E. (PI) ; Krams, S. (PI) ; Krummel, T. (PI) ; Lau, J. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Leeper, N. (PI) ; Lin, J. (PI) ; Lipman, G. (PI) ; Longaker, M. (PI) ; Lorenz, H. (PI) ; Maggio, P. (PI) ; Mahadevan, S. (PI) ; Martinez, O. (PI) ; Melcher, M. (PI) ; Mell, M. (PI) ; Morton, J. (PI) ; Mueller, C. (PI) ; Murphy, K. (PI) ; Norris, R. (PI) ; Norton, J. (PI) ; Oberhelman, H. (PI) ; Perera, P. (PI) ; Poultsides, G. (PI) ; Quinn, J. (PI) ; Raphael, E. (PI) ; Rhoads, K. (PI) ; Rivas, H. (PI) ; Ryan, J. (PI) ; Salvatierra, O. (PI) ; Schendel, S. (PI) ; Schreiber, D. (PI) ; Shelton, A. (PI) ; Shen, S. (PI) ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI) ; So, S. (PI) ; Spain, D. (PI) ; Srivastava, S. (PI) ; Staudenmayer, K. (PI) ; Sternbach, G. (PI) ; Strehlow, M. (PI) ; Sylvester, K. (PI) ; Taleghani, N. (PI) ; Trounce, M. (PI) ; Visser, B. (PI) ; Wan, D. (PI) ; Wang, N. (PI) ; Wapnir, I. (PI) ; Weiss, E. (PI) ; Welton, M. (PI) ; Whitmore, I. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Wren, S. (PI) ; Yang, G. (PI) ; Yang, S. (PI) ; Zafren, K. (PI) ; Zarins, C. (PI) ; Zhou, W. (PI)

EMED 313A: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

Overall Description: During this 4-week, multi-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients in three unique emergency department settings: Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC), and the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center (KPMC). At each of these sites, rotators will work directly with an emergency medicine attending. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of the three clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work thirteen 8-hour clinical shifts (7 at SUMC, 3 at SCVMC, 3 at KPMC) during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complaint-directed history and physical exam, developing a focused differential diagnosis, and then designing and implementing a targeted care plan with input and support from the attending physician. Students will also learn essential communication skills, acting as the primary contact between the care team, patients, patient¿s families, consultants and hospital staff. Educational Curriculum: Throughout the rotation, students will have access to a number of supporting educational events outside of the emergency department. Students will attend weekly core curriculum conference with the Stanford/Kaiser Emergency Medicine residents, as well as a monthly journal club. Rotators will also have dedicated, student oriented educational sessions focused on bedside ultrasound, laceration repair, orthopedic injury management, and ECG interpretation, as well as a series of interactive, faculty-led, case discussions. The rotation culminates in a final written exam and an immersive, student-only simulation session held at Stanford¿s innovative Center for Immersive and Simulation Based Learning. Visiting students ONLY accepted periods 12-6, pre-approval is required only for visiting students for periods 12-6. Pre-approval dates are as follows: Periods 1-3 (March 19-23), Period 4-6 (June 19-23), and Period 12 (December 1-5). Please contact clerkship coordinator Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu) to inquire about pre approval process and materials needed for submission.nnPrerequisitesnAll students must have completed core clerkships in medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn and pediatrics are required. Stanford medical students must also have completed MED 313A. Exceptions only at the discretion of the clerkship director, on a case by cases basis.nnPeriods Availablen1-12, full-time for four weeks. Visiting students accepted periods 12-6 only. Maximum 12 students per period. No adjustments in dates. No students may be added less than one week prior to start of each rotation.nnReporting Instructions:nWhere: 900 Welch Road Suite 350; Time: Coordinator will email details one week prior to the first day of the rotation block. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the 3 different sites.nnUnits 6 Drop Code T Call Code 2 (No call, but a mixture of at least 3 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block) nnDirector:nPeter Acker, M.D. at packer@stanford.edu, Jessica Ngo, M.D. at jngo@stanford.edu and Nounou Taleghani, M.D. at nounou@stanford.edu.nnOther FacultynEmergency Dept Faculty.nnCoordinatornMaria Alfonso (650-497-6702), malfonso@stanford.edu nnn* "S1"=Selective Clerkship Category I (Basics in Clinical Care)n"S2"=Selective Clerkship Category II (Subinternship)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
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