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21 - 30 of 33 results for: EMED ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EMED 225: The ED as a Safety Net

As the sole source of medical care and social services available 24/7 to all patients regardless of insurance status, ability to pay or even complaint, Emergency Departments (ED) are safety nets for local communities. EDs serve as a window into society and offer opportunities for intervention. The field of Social Emergency Medicine uses this unique position to investigate societal patterns of health inequity and develop solutions to decrease health disparities for vulnerable populations. This dinner seminar will explore psychosocial, economic, and medical factore that contribute to human health from the perspective of ED providers. Each session will cover a different topic of societal emergency medicine such as opioid use, human trafficking, firearms, and homelessness. Possible interventions will also be discussed including buprenorphine, screening, and identification tools, medical-legal partnerships, and legislative advocacy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 229: Pediatric Point of Care Ultrasound

Point of Care Ultrasound AND Pediatric specific Point of Care Ultrasound Course emphasizes a hands on approach to teaching the key points in using beside ultrasound taught by faculty and fellows of the Stanford department of emergency medicine ultrasound section. Each class will start with a short lecture reviewing a particular ultrasound exam, followed by a large amount of hands on scanning time focusing on acquiring high quality images. This course is an excellent adjunct to not only to anatomy , physiology , pathophysiology , but also enhancing physical exam skills while constructing a differential diagnosis. In addition to the general point of care ultrasound, we will introduce and review unique and specific applications related to the Pediatric population who are at higher risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Course will cover the pediatric abdomen for diagnosis of pyloric stenosis, intussusception, appendicitis, lungs ,for diagnosis of pneumonia or pleural effusion and the pediatric hip exam for diagnosis of septic arthritis . By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the ultrasound skills needed to start using it at bedside in upcoming clinical rotations. The course is open to all Stanford medical students, PA students, and undergraduates.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EMED 231: Peer Counseling for Medical Students

This course meets for 5 total sessions, and covers topics including compassionate listening, problem solving, understanding imposter syndromes, role of emotions in decision making, implicit bias training, professionalism, and ethics and boundaries. Students will engage in dedicated interactive sessions to prepare them for common scenarios and potential approaches for resolution. Faculty mentors from the Office of Medical Student Wellness, Counseling and Psychological Services staff at the Vaden Health Center, and Ear4Peer (E4P) upperclass student team leaders will collaborate each week to lead the sessions. Students will also receive training on campus resources and appropriate channels for referring peers to professional services. This course is a pre-requisite for students interested in becoming an E4P. Prerequisites: Must be a currently enrolled medical or PA student
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 255: Design for Health: Helping Patients Navigate the System (DESINST 255)

For many people, participating in the American healthcare system is confusing, frustrating and often disempowering. It is also an experience fueled with emotional intensity and feelings of vulnerability. The current ecosystem, with its complexity and multiple stakeholders, is rife with human-centered design opportunities. An especially sticky set of issues lies in the ways people navigate healthcare: understanding how the system works, accessing information about services, making decisions about treatment and interventions, and advocating for needs.nAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

EMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Emergency Medicine

Provides an observational experience in an emergency medicine specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Albanese, C. (PI) ; Auerbach, P. (PI) ; Barrett, B. (PI) ; Bonham, C. (PI) ; Bresler, M. (PI) ; Bruzoni, M. (PI) ; Busque, S. (PI) ; Chang, J. (PI) ; Chase, R. (PI) ; Concepcion, W. (PI) ; Curtin, C. (PI) ; D'Souza, P. (PI) ; Dalman, R. (PI) ; Dannenberg, B. (PI) ; Dirbas, F. (PI) ; Duriseti, R. (PI) ; Dutta, S. (PI) ; Eisenberg, D. (PI) ; Emond, S. (PI) ; Esquivel, C. (PI) ; Ferguson, I. (PI) ; Fuchs, J. (PI) ; Garmel, G. (PI) ; Gharahbaghian, L. (PI) ; Gilbert, G. (PI) ; Girod, S. (PI) ; Gosling, J. (PI) ; Govindarajan, P. (PI) ; Greco, R. (PI) ; Gregg, D. (PI) ; Gurtner, G. (PI) ; Harris, E. (PI) ; Harter, P. (PI) ; Hartman, G. (PI) ; Helms, J. (PI) ; Hentz, R. (PI) ; Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI) ; Jeffrey, S. (PI) ; Kahn, D. (PI) ; Khosla, R. (PI) ; Klofas, E. (PI) ; Krams, S. (PI) ; Krummel, T. (PI) ; Lau, J. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Leeper, N. (PI) ; Lin, J. (PI) ; Lipman, G. (PI) ; Longaker, M. (PI) ; Lorenz, H. (PI) ; Maggio, P. (PI) ; Mahadevan, S. (PI) ; Martinez, O. (PI) ; Melcher, M. (PI) ; Mell, M. (PI) ; Morton, J. (PI) ; Mueller, C. (PI) ; Murphy, K. (PI) ; Norris, R. (PI) ; Norton, J. (PI) ; Oberhelman, H. (PI) ; Perera, P. (PI) ; Poultsides, G. (PI) ; Quinn, J. (PI) ; Raphael, E. (PI) ; Rhoads, K. (PI) ; Rivas, H. (PI) ; Ryan, J. (PI) ; Salvatierra, O. (PI) ; Schendel, S. (PI) ; Schreiber, D. (PI) ; Shelton, A. (PI) ; Shen, S. (PI) ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI) ; So, S. (PI) ; Spain, D. (PI) ; Srivastava, S. (PI) ; Staudenmayer, K. (PI) ; Sternbach, G. (PI) ; Strehlow, M. (PI) ; Sylvester, K. (PI) ; Taleghani, N. (PI) ; Trounce, M. (PI) ; Visser, B. (PI) ; Wan, D. (PI) ; Wang, N. (PI) ; Wapnir, I. (PI) ; Weiss, E. (PI) ; Welton, M. (PI) ; Whitmore, I. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Wren, S. (PI) ; Yang, G. (PI) ; Yang, S. (PI) ; Zafren, K. (PI) ; Zarins, C. (PI) ; Zhou, W. (PI)

EMED 299: Directed Reading in Emergency Medicine

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 308A: Bedside Ultrasound Clerkship

Open to visitors. Diagnostic bedside ultrasound (US) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This rotation is designed to introduce bedside ultrasound to the clinical medical student, and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with bedside US for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in the emergency room or on the floors with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. A goal for a minimum number of ultrasound scans will be 25 per application including, eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aor more »
Open to visitors. Diagnostic bedside ultrasound (US) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This rotation is designed to introduce bedside ultrasound to the clinical medical student, and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with bedside US for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in the emergency room or on the floors with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. A goal for a minimum number of ultrasound scans will be 25 per application including, eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. Other advanced ultrasound applications will also be introduced (Testicular, airway, bladder, nerve blocks). Students will obtain US images in the Stanford emergency department and will have all imaging formally reviewed by an US fellowship trained emergency medicine faculty. Images will be obtained during work shifts, when one of the US EM faculty are working in the ED, during when students will scan appropriate patients and review images with the faculty member onsite. They will also have scan shifts, when an US EM faculty will teach/scan with the student in the emergency department, this is a 1:1 session. Students will attend Bedside US didactics offered by an US EM faculty member every Thursday morning, followed by 4 hours of QA review of Ultrasound scans performed in the ED. Students will have access and be expected to participate in online and computer based learning that will be provided for them as well. A multiple choice test will be given at the end of the rotation. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. Please contact Dr. Deborah Kimball at drdeb@stanford.edu if interested in taking the clerkship. Prereq: Complete pre-clinical training. Periods Avail: 3-12 for 2 or 4 weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Deborah Kimball, M.D. Other Faculty: K. Anderson, L. Gharahbaghian, V. Lobo, P. Perera, C. Poffenberger, and S. Williams. nCoord: Hienock Habte (650-736-8842), habte@stanford.edu (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6

EMED 313A: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Overall Description: During this 4-week, multi-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients in three unique emergency department settings: Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC), and the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center (KPMC). At each of these sites, rotators will work directly with an emergency medicine attending. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of the three clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work thirteen 8-hour clinical shifts (7 at SUMC, 3 at SCVMC, 3 at KPMC) during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. Overall Description: During this 4-week, multi-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients in three unique emergency department settings: Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC), and the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center (KPMC). At each of these sites, rotators will work directly with an emergency medicine attending. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of the three clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work thirteen 8-hour clinical shifts (7 at SUMC, 3 at SCVMC, 3 at KPMC) during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complaint-directed history and physical exam, developing a focused differential diagnosis, and then designing and implementing a targeted care plan with input and support from the attending physician. Students will also learn essential communication skills, acting as the primary contact between the care team, patients, patient¿s families, consultants and hospital staff. Educational Curriculum: Throughout the rotation, students will have access to a number of supporting educational events outside of the emergency department. Students will attend weekly core curriculum conference with the Stanford/Kaiser Emergency Medicine residents, as well as a monthly journal club. Rotators will also have dedicated, student oriented educational sessions focused on bedside ultrasound, laceration repair, orthopedic injury management, and ECG interpretation, as well as a series of interactive, faculty-led, case discussions. The rotation culminates in a final written exam and an immersive, student-only simulation session held at Stanford¿s innovative Center for Immersive and Simulation Based Learning. Stanford students who want to do a clinical based rotation at Stanford site during Periods 7-11, please contact coordinator at malfonso@stanford.edu to coordinate enrollment in Emed 398A. Visiting students ONLY accepted periods 12-6, pre-approval is required only for visiting students for periods 12-6. Pre-approval dates are as follows: Periods 1-3 (March 19-23), Period 4-6 (June 19-23), and Period 12 (December 1-5). Please contact clerkship coordinator Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu) to inquire about pre approval process and materials needed for submission. Prereq: All students must have completed core clerkships in medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn and pediatrics are required. Stanford medical students must also have completed MED 313A. Exceptions only at the discretion of the clerkship director, on a case by cases basis. nPeriods Avail: Periods 12-6 only. Closed Periods 7-11. Full-time for four weeks. Visiting students and Stanford students accepted periods 12-6 only. Maximum 12 students per period. No adjustments in dates. No students may be added less than three weeks prior to start of each rotation. Reporting Instructions: Where: 900 Welch Road Suite 350; Time: Coordinator will email details one week prior to the first day of the rotation block. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the 3 different sites. Units: 6. Call Code: 2 (No call, but a mixture of at least 3 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block) Director: Jessica Ngo, M.D. at jngo@stanford.edu, Gregory Gilbert, M.D. at ghgilbert@stanford.edu, and Nounou Taleghani, M.D. at nounou@stanford.edu. Other Faculty: Emergency Dept Faculty. Coord: Maria Alfonso (650-497-6702), malfonso@stanford.edu (SUMC, SCVMC, KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

EMED 313D: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

Selective 1. Closed to visitors. This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 4 week rotation consists of 14 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Please arrive at 0900 on Monday morning in the GME office for paperwork and photo ID, unless otherwise notified. An orientation video and a copy of ¿An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine, Mahadevan/Garmel¿, will be provided by the GME office for use during the rotation. Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 14 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM more »
Selective 1. Closed to visitors. This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 4 week rotation consists of 14 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Please arrive at 0900 on Monday morning in the GME office for paperwork and photo ID, unless otherwise notified. An orientation video and a copy of ¿An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine, Mahadevan/Garmel¿, will be provided by the GME office for use during the rotation. Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 14 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM attending staff physician. Students should present each patient upon completing history and physical examination in a timely fashion. EM residents will give daily informal lectures at 4pm, which students are encouraged to attend when on shift. nPrereq: Surgery 300A, Medicine 300A, Obstetrics & Gynecology 300A and Pediatric 300A, passing score USMLE I (and II if taken) on first attempt. For visiting students, core clerkships must be completed with passing grades in Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, and OB/GYN. nPeriods Avail: Periods 7-11 only. Stanford students only. Full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. No students may be added less than three weeks prior to the start of each rotation. nReporting Instructions: Where: Kaiser Permanente Medical Center Emergency Department, Santa Clara, CA; Time: TBA. Prior to first shift - report to GME office, Homestead Medical Office Building at 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384. Units: 6. Call Code: 2. Director: Alice Chao, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Susan Krause (408-851-3836) 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384, Santa Clara. (KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit
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