2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 4 of 4 results for: EE180

CS 349H: Software Techniques for Emergent Hardware Platforms (EE 292Y)

Research seminar on software techniques for emergent computational substrates with guest lectures from hardware designers from research and industry. This seminar explores the benefits of novel hardware technologies, the challenges gating broad adoption of these technologies, and how software techniques can help mitigate these challenges and improve the usability of these hardware platforms. Note that the computational substrates discussed vary depending on thensemester. Topics covered include: In-memory computing platforms, dynamical system-solving mixed-signal devices, exible and bendable electronics, neuromorphic computers, intermittent computing platforms, ReRAMs, DNA-based storage, and optical computing platforms. Prerequisites: CS107 or CS107E (required) and EE180 (recommended).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 357S: Formal Methods for Computer Systems

The complexity of modern computer systems requires rigorous and systematic verification/validation techniques to evaluate their ability to correctly and securely support application programs. To this end, a growing body of work in both industry and academia leverages formal methods techniques to solve computer systems challenges. This course is a research seminar that will cover foundational work and current topics in the application of formal methods-style techniques (some possible examples include SAT/SMT, model checking, symbolic execution, theorem proving, program synthesis, fuzzing) to reliable and secure computer systems design. The course can be thought of as an applied formal methods course where the application is reliable and secure architecture, microarchitecture, and distributed systems design. Prior formal methods experience is not necessary. Students will read and discuss published research papers and complete an original research project. Open to PhD and masters students as well as advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisites: EE180 Digital Systems Architecture or comparable course, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EE 180: Digital Systems Architecture

The design of processor-based digital systems. Instruction sets, addressing modes, data types. Assembly language programming, low-level data structures, introduction to operating systems and compilers. Processor microarchitecture, microprogramming, pipelining. Memory systems and caches. Input/output, interrupts, buses and DMA. System design implementation alternatives, software/hardware tradeoffs. Labs involve the design of processor subsystems and processor-based embedded systems. Formerly EE 108B. Prerequisite: one of CS107 or CS 107E (required) and EE108 (recommended but not required).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

EE 292Y: Software Techniques for Emergent Hardware Platforms (CS 349H)

Research seminar on software techniques for emergent computational substrates with guest lectures from hardware designers from research and industry. This seminar explores the benefits of novel hardware technologies, the challenges gating broad adoption of these technologies, and how software techniques can help mitigate these challenges and improve the usability of these hardware platforms. Note that the computational substrates discussed vary depending on thensemester. Topics covered include: In-memory computing platforms, dynamical system-solving mixed-signal devices, exible and bendable electronics, neuromorphic computers, intermittent computing platforms, ReRAMs, DNA-based storage, and optical computing platforms. Prerequisites: CS107 or CS107E (required) and EE180 (recommended).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints