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1 - 10 of 84 results for: EE

EE 25N: Science of Information

We live in the Information Age, but what is information, anyway? In 1948, Claude Shannon published a seminal paper formalizing our modern notion of information. Through lectures and lab visits, we'll learn how information can be measured and represented, why bits are the universal currency for information exchange, and how these ideas led to smartphones, the Internet, and more. We¿ll get a glimpse of information elements in other domains, including neural codes of the brain, cryptographic codes, genetic code, quantum information, and even entertainment. As a final project, students will create podcast episodes on one of the topics explored in the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 42: Introduction to Electromagnetics and Its Applications (ENGR 42)

Electricity and magnetism and its essential role in modern electrical engineering devices and systems, such as sensors, displays, DVD players, and optical communication systems. The topics that will be covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, one-dimensional wave equation, electromagnetic waves, transmission lines, and one-dimensional resonators. Pre-requisites: none.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 100: The Electrical Engineering Profession

Lectures/discussions on topics of importance to the electrical engineering professional. Continuing education, professional societies, intellectual property and patents, ethics, entrepreneurial engineering, and engineering management.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 101A: Circuits I

Introduction to circuit modeling and analysis. Topics include creating the models of typical components in electronic circuits and simplifying non-linear models for restricted ranges of operation (small signal model); and using network theory to solve linear and non-linear circuits under static and dynamic operations. Prerequisite: ENGR40 or ENGR40M is useful but not strictly required.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 102A: Signal Processing and Linear Systems I

Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in signal processing, communications, and control. Mathematical representation of signals and systems. Linearity and time invariance. System impulse and step responses. System frequency response. Frequency-domain representations: Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Filtering and signal distortion. Time/frequency sampling and interpolation. Continuous-discrete-time signal conversion and quantization. Discrete-time signal processing. Prerequisite: MATH 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kahn, J. (PI)

EE 103: Introduction to Matrix Methods (CME 103)

Introduction to applied linear algebra with emphasis on applications. Vectors, norm, and angle; linear independence and orthonormal sets; applications to document analysis. Clustering and the k-means algorithm. Matrices, left and right inverses, QR factorization. Least-squares and model fitting, regularization and cross-validation. Constrained and nonlinear least-squares. Applications include time-series prediction, tomography, optimal control, and portfolio optimization. Undergraduate students should enroll for 5 units, and graduate students should enroll for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME 100, and basic knowledge of computing ( CS 106A is more than enough, and can be taken concurrently). EE103/CME103 and Math 104 cover complementary topics in applied linear algebra. The focus of EE103 is on a few linear algebra concepts, and many applications; the focus of Math 104 is on algorithms and concepts.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 108: Digital System Design

Digital circuit, logic, and system design. Digital representation of information. CMOS logic circuits. Combinational logic design. Logic building blocks, idioms, and structured design. Sequential logic design and timing analysis. Clocks and synchronization. Finite state machines. Microcode control. Digital system design. Control and datapath partitioning. Lab. *In Autumn, enrollment preference is given to EE majors. Any EE majors who must enroll in Autumn are invited to contact the instructor. Formerly EE 108A.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mitra, S. (PI)

EE 114: Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design (EE 214A)

Analysis and simulation of elementary transistor stages, current mirrors, supply- and temperature-independent bias, and reference circuits. Overview of integrated circuit technologies, circuit components, component variations and practical design paradigms. Differential circuits, frequency response, and feedback will also be covered. Performance evaluation using computer-aided design tools. Undergraduates must take EE 114 for 4 units. Prerequisite: 101B. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 118: Introduction to Mechatronics (ME 210)

Technologies involved in mechatronics (intelligent electro-mechanical systems), and techniques to apply this technology to mecatronic system design. Topics include: electronics (A/D, D/A converters, op-amps, filters, power devices); software program design, event-driven programming; hardware and DC stepper motors, solenoids, and robust sensing. Large, open-ended team project. Prerequisites: ENGR 40, CS 106, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 124: Introduction to Neuroelectrical Engineering

Fundamental properties of electrical activity in neurons, technology for measuring and altering neural activity, and operating principles of modern neurological and neural prosthetic medical systems. Topics: action potential generation and propagation, neuro-MEMS and measurement systems, experimental design and statistical data analysis, information encoding and decoding, clinical diagnostic systems, and fully-implantable neural prosthetic systems design. Prerequisite: EE 101A and EE 102A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shenoy, K. (PI)
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