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1 - 10 of 71 results for: EE

EE 17N: Engineering the Micro and Nano Worlds: From Chips to Genes

Preference to freshmen. The first part is hands-on micro- and nano-fabrication including the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF) and the Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and field trips to local companies and other research centers to illustrate the many applications; these include semiconductor integrated circuits ('chips'), DNA microarrays, microfluidic bio-sensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The second part is to create, design, propose and execute a project. Most of the grade will be based on the project. By the end of the course you will, of course, be able to read critically a New York Times article on nanotechnology. More importantly you will have experienced the challenge (and fun) of designing, carrying out and presenting your own experimental project. As a result you will be better equipped to choose your major. This course can complement (and differs from) the seminars offered by Profs Philip Wong and Hari Manoharan in that it emphasizes laboratory work and an experimental student-designed project. Prerequisites: high-school physics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 23N: Imaging: From the Atom to the Universe

Preference to freshmen. Forms of imaging including human and animal vision systems, atomic force microscope, microscope, digital camera, holography and three-dimensional imaging, telescope, synthetic aperture radar imaging, nuclear magnetic imaging, sonar and gravitational wave imaging, and the Hubble Space telescope. Physical principles and exposure to real imaging devices and systems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 46: Engineering For Good: Save the World and Have Fun Doing It

Projects that provide immediate and positive impact on the world. Focus is on global health by learning from experts in this field. Students work on real-world projects with help from members of NGOs and social entrepreneurial companies as part of the hand-on learning experience. Prerequisite: ENGR 40 or EE 122A or CS 106B or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 65: Modern Physics for Engineers

This course introduces the core ideas of modern physics that enable applications ranging from solar energy and efficient lighting to the modern electronic and optical devices and nanotechnologies that sense, process, store, communicate and display all our information. Though the ideas have broad impact, the course is widely accessible to engineering and science students with only basic linear algebra and calculus through simple ordinary differential equations as mathematics background. Topics include the quantum mechanics of electrons and photons (Schrödinger's equation, atoms, electrons, energy levels and energy bands; absorption and emission of photons; quantum confinement in nanostructures), the statistical mechanics of particles (entropy, the Boltzmann factor, thermal distributions), the thermodynamics of light (thermal radiation, limits to light concentration, spontaneous and stimulated emission), and the physics of information (Maxwell¿s demon, reversibility, entropy and noise in physics and information theory). Pre-requisite: Physics 41. Pre- or co-requisite: Math 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 101A: Circuits I

Introduction to circuit modeling and analysis. Topics include creating the models of typical components in electronic circuits and simplifying non-linear models for restricted ranges of operation (small signal model); and using network theory to solve linear and non-linear circuits under static and dynamic operations. Prerequisite: ENGR40 or ENGR40M is useful but not strictly required.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 101B: Circuits II

Continuation of EE101A. Introduction to circuit design for modern electronic systems. Modeling and analysis of analog gain stages, frequency response, feedback. Filtering and analog¿to¿digital conversion. Fundamentals of circuit simulation. Prerequisites: EE101A, EE102A. Recommended: CME102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 102A: Signal Processing and Linear Systems I

Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in signal processing, communications, and control. Mathematical representation of signals and systems. Linearity and time invariance. System impulse and step responses. System frequency response. Frequency-domain representations: Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Filtering and signal distortion. Time/frequency sampling and interpolation. Continuous-discrete-time signal conversion and quantization. Discrete-time signal processing. Prerequisite: MATH 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 102B: Signal Processing and Linear Systems II

Continuation of EE 102A. Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in communications, signal processing and control. Analog and digital modulation and demodulation. Sampling, reconstruction, decimation and interpolation. Finite impulse response filter design. Discrete Fourier transforms, applications in convolution and spectral analysis. Laplace transforms, applications in circuits and feedback control. Z transforms, applications in infinite impulse response filter design. Prerequisite: EE 102A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 107: Embedded Networked Systems

Networked embedded systems are often hidden from our view, but they are a key component that enables our modern society. Embedded systems bridge our physical world with powerful digital measurement and control systems. Applications of today's embedded systems range from stabilization in drones authentication in credit cards, and even temperature control in toasters. In this class, students will learn about how to build an networked embedded system from the ground up. The lectures will focus on the key enabling components of embedded systems, including: Clocks, GPIO, Interrupts, Busses, Amplifiers, Regulators, Power supplies, ADC/DAC, DMA, and Storage. The goal of the class is to familiarize the students with these components such that they can build their own embedded systems in devices. Prerequisites: EE 102A or ENGR 40M.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 109: Digital Systems Design Lab

The design of integrated digital systems encompassing both customized software and hardware. Software/hardware design tradeoffs. Algorithm design for pipelining and parallelism. System latency and throughput tradeoffs. FPGA optimization techniques. Integration with external systems and smart devices. Firmware configuration and embedded system considerations. Enrollment limited to 25; preference to graduating seniors. Prerequisites: 108B, and CS 106B or X.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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