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1 - 10 of 77 results for: EE

EE 46: Engineering For Good: Save the World and Have Fun Doing It

Projects that provide immediate and positive impact on the world. Focus is on global health by learning from experts in this field. Students work on real-world projects with help from members of NGOs and social entrepreneurial companies as part of the hand-on learning experience. Prerequisite: ENGR 40 or EE 122A or CS 106B or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Le, M. (PI)

EE 65: Modern Physics for Engineers

This course introduces the core ideas of modern physics that enable applications ranging from solar energy and efficient lighting to the modern electronic and optical devices and nanotechnologies that sense, process, store, communicate and display all our information. Though the ideas have broad impact, the course is widely accessible to engineering and science students with only basic linear algebra and calculus through simple ordinary differential equations as mathematics background. Topics include the quantum mechanics of electrons and photons (Schrödinger's equation, atoms, electrons, energy levels and energy bands; absorption and emission of photons; quantum confinement in nanostructures), the statistical mechanics of particles (entropy, the Boltzmann factor, thermal distributions), the thermodynamics of light (thermal radiation, limits to light concentration, spontaneous and stimulated emission), and the physics of information (Maxwell¿s demon, reversibility, entropy and noise in physics and information theory). Pre-requisite: Physics 41. Pre- or co-requisite: Math 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miller, D. (PI)

EE 101A: Circuits I

First of two-course sequence. Introduction to circuit modeling and analysis. Topics include creating the models of typical components in electronic circuits and simplifying non-linear models for restricted ranges of operation (small signal model); and using network theory to solve linear and non-linear circuits under static and dynamic operations. Prerequisite: ENGR40 or ENGR40M is useful but not strictly required.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 101B: Circuits II

Second of two-course sequence. MOS large-signal and small-signal models. MOS amplifier design including DC bias, small signal performance, multistage amplifiers, frequency response, and feedback. Prerequisite: EE101A, EE102A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Murmann, B. (PI)

EE 102A: Signal Processing and Linear Systems I

Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in signal processing, communications, and control. Mathematical representation of signals and systems. Linearity and time invariance. System impulse and step responses. System frequency response. Frequency-domain representations: Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Filtering and signal distortion. Time/frequency sampling and interpolation. Continuous-discrete-time signal conversion and quantization. Discrete-time signal processing. Prerequisite: MATH 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 102B: Signal Processing and Linear Systems II

Continuation of EE 102A. Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in communications, signal processing and control. Analog and digital modulation and demodulation. Sampling, reconstruction, decimation and interpolation. Finite impulse response filter design. Discrete Fourier transforms, applications in convolution and spectral analysis. Laplace transforms, applications in circuits and feedback control. Z transforms, applications in infinite impulse response filter design. Prerequisite: EE 102A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kahn, J. (PI)

EE 116: Semiconductor Device Physics

The fundamental operation of semiconductor devices and overview of applications. The physical principles of semiconductors, both silicon and compound materials; operating principles and device equations for junction devices (diodes, bipolar transistor, photo-detectors). Introduction to quantum effects and band theory of solids. Prerequisite: ENGR 40. Corequisite: 101B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pop, E. (PI)

EE 122B: Introduction to Biomedical Electronics

EE122B is a laboratory course covering the design and realization of key components and architectures of modern biomedical electronics systems, their application in clinical and research measurements, and practical matters in their safe reduction to practice. Material in each topic area begins with an overview of the underlying physiology. Details are presented beginning with the molecular, cellular, organ-level origins of the biosignals, followed by the relevant transduction principles, nature of the signals (amplitude, frequency spectrum, etc.), and their processing and clinical use. Specific engineering topics include safety in biomedical instruments, fundamentals of analog/digital conversion and filtering techniques for biosignals, typical transducers (biopotential, electrochemical, temperature, pressure, acoustic, movement), applications (cardiovascular medicine, neurology, pulmonology, etc.) and interfacing circuits. Prerequisite: EE122A or equivalent hands-on mixed-signal design experience and solid working knowledge of EE122A topics (see course description).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 178: Probabilistic Systems Analysis

Introduction to probability and statistics and their role in modeling and analyzing real world phenomena. Events, sample space, and probability. Discrete random variables, probability mass functions, independence and conditional probability, expectation and conditional expectation. Continuous random variables, probability density functions, independence and expectation, derived densities. Transforms, moments, sums of independent random variables. Simple random processes. Limit theorems. Introduction to statistics: significance, estimation and detection. Prerequisites: basic calculus.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 17N: Engineering the Micro and Nano Worlds: From Chips to Genes

Preference to freshmen. The first part is hands-on micro- and nano-fabrication including the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF) and the Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and field trips to local companies and other research centers to illustrate the many applications; these include semiconductor integrated circuits ('chips'), DNA microarrays, microfluidic bio-sensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The second part is to create, design, propose and execute a project. Most of the grade will be based on the project. By the end of the course you will, of course, be able to read critically a New York Times article on nanotechnology. More importantly you will have experienced the challenge (and fun) of designing, carrying out and presenting your own experimental project. As a result you will be better equipped to choose your major. This course can complement (and differs from) the seminars offered by Profs Philip Wong and Hari Manoharan in that it emphasizes laboratory work and an experimental student-designed project. Prerequisites: high-school physics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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