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71 - 80 of 101 results for: EDUC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EDUC 361: Workshop: Networks and Organizations (SOC 361W)

For students doing advanced research. Group comments and criticism on dissertation projects at any phase of completion, including data problems, empirical and theoretical challenges, presentation refinement, and job market presentations. Collaboration, debate, and shaping research ideas. Prerequisite: courses in organizational theory or social network analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 367: Cultural Psychology

(Formerly 292.) The relationship between culture and psychological processes; how culture becomes an integral part of cognitive, social, and moral development. Both historical and contemporary treatments of cultural psychology, including deficit models, crosscultural psychology, ecological niches, culturally specific versus universal development, sociocultural frameworks, and minority child development. The role of race and power in research on cultural psychology. Course is designed to meet the interests of doctoral students. Enrollment of undergraduate seniors considered; course content not appropriate for freshman, sophomore, nor junior undergraduates.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 781), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

EDUC 375A: Seminar on Organizational Theory (MS&E 389, SOC 363A)

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field. For PhD students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intel more »
(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EDUC 377G: Problem Solving for Social Change

(Also GSBGEN 367). Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's and Mark Wolfson's course, Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing ( GSBGEN 319), which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

EDUC 380: Supervised Internship

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Alim, H. (PI) ; Alvarado, A. (PI) ; Antonio, A. (PI) ; Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Atkin, J. (PI) ; Aukerman, M. (PI) ; Ball, A. (PI) ; Barron, B. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Blikstein, P. (PI) ; Booker, A. (PI) ; Borko, H. (PI) ; Brazer, S. (PI) ; Brest, P. (PI) ; Bridges, E. (PI) ; Brown, B. (PI) ; Brown, N. (PI) ; Bryk, T. (PI) ; Calfee, R. (PI) ; Callan, E. (PI) ; Carnoy, M. (PI) ; Carter, P. (PI) ; Cohen, G. (PI) ; Cuban, L. (PI) ; Damon, W. (PI) ; Darling-Hammond, L. (PI) ; Dee, T. (PI) ; Ehrlich, T. (PI) ; Eisner, E. (PI) ; Fogg, B. (PI) ; Forssell, K. (PI) ; Gage, N. (PI) ; Goldenberg, C. (PI) ; Goldman, S. (PI) ; Gordon, L. (PI) ; Greeno, J. (PI) ; Grossman, P. (PI) ; Gumport, P. (PI) ; Haertel, E. (PI) ; Hakuta, K. (PI) ; Hanushek, E. (PI) ; Heath, S. (PI) ; Hoagland, G. (PI) ; Juel, C. (PI) ; Kamil, M. (PI) ; Kelman, A. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kim, P. (PI) ; Kirst, M. (PI) ; Koski, W. (PI) ; Krumboltz, J. (PI) ; LaFromboise, T. (PI) ; Labaree, D. (PI) ; Levin, H. (PI) ; Lit, I. (PI) ; Loeb, S. (PI) ; Lotan, R. (PI) ; Lythcott, J. (PI) ; March, J. (PI) ; Martinez, A. (PI) ; Massy, W. (PI) ; McDermott, R. (PI) ; McFarland, D. (PI) ; McLaughlin, M. (PI) ; Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI) ; Meyerson, D. (PI) ; Murata, A. (PI) ; Nasir, N. (PI) ; Noddings, N. (PI) ; O'Hara, S. (PI) ; Obradovic, J. (PI) ; Olkin, I. (PI) ; Osborne, J. (PI) ; Padilla, A. (PI) ; Pea, R. (PI) ; Phillips, D. (PI) ; Pope, D. (PI) ; Porteus, A. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Powell, W. (PI) ; Ramirez, F. (PI) ; Reich, R. (PI) ; Rickford, J. (PI) ; Rogosa, D. (PI) ; Rohlen, T. (PI) ; Salinas, N. (PI) ; Schwartz, D. (PI) ; Shavelson, R. (PI) ; Shulman, L. (PI) ; Simms, W. (PI) ; Spindler, G. (PI) ; Staklis, S. (PI) ; Stevens, M. (PI) ; Stipek, D. (PI) ; Stout, F. (PI) ; Strober, M. (PI) ; Suarez, D. (PI) ; Thoresen, C. (PI) ; Tyack, D. (PI) ; Valdes, G. (PI) ; Walker, D. (PI) ; Weiler, H. (PI) ; Willinsky, J. (PI) ; Wineburg, S. (PI) ; Wotipka, C. (PI) ; reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 387: Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems (SOC 311A)

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

EDUC 388F: Introduction to Academic Language

This course will provide opportunities for pre-service teachers to begin to develop an understanding of language uses, forms, and mechanics through application of a functional approach to academic language. By exploring language structures (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as well as lanauge-in-use (pragmatics and discourse), teacher candidates will be able to better recognize linguistic demands and challenges of students in the classroom.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

EDUC 400A: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Education

(Formerly EDUC 160.) Basic techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics for educational research will be covered with an emphasis on rigorous preparation for intermediate and advanced courses. Topics include central tendency, variance, probability, distributions, confidence interval, t-test, F-test, correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Non-parametric statistics and graphical principles for data representation will also be addressed. Students will also be introduced to STATA in preparation for subsequent higher level courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Schwartz, D. (PI)
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