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1 - 10 of 101 results for: EDUC

EDUC 98: Service Learning Practicum

For Alternative Spring Break program leaders. The skills and philosophical framework to develop and lead an ASB experience. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EDUC 100A: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, the theme is "Ten Careers in Education in Ten Weeks." Each week will feature a speaker from a different sector in education including school administration, arts education, information technology, special education, international development, student affairs, education consulting, and education policy. In the spring, the seminar will focus on Human Rights Education. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice. Notes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave. The seminar is open to all students at Stanford with first-priority given to pre-assign residents of EAST House followed by other residents of EAST and all other undergraduates. Graduate students are allowed to enroll on a space-available basis. Visitors/auditors are not allowed. The seminar is required for all pre-assigned residents of EAST House and is repeatable for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 101: Introduction to Teaching and Learning

This course is designed to help undergraduates explore career interests in education; it is the core course for the Undergraduate Minor in Education, and fulfills requirements for Honors in Education. The course considers the philosophy, history, politics, professional practice and social structures of teaching in the United States. Students will read and discuss teaching theory and research, participate in learning activities and visit school teaching sites, as well as examine and analyze artifacts and models of teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Wolf, J. (PI)

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

EDUC 116N: Howard Zinn and the Quest for Historical Truth (HISTORY 116N)

With more than two million copies in print, Howard Zinn's A People's History is a cultural icon. We will use Zinn's book to probe how we determine what was true in the past. A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Wineburg, S. (PI)

EDUC 117: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 417)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 118S: Designing Your Stanford (ME 104S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational and vocational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes, explored through the design thinking process. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Expect ideation tools, storytelling practices, prototyping to discover more about yourself and possible paths forward. The course concludes with creation of multiple versions of what college might look like and how to make those ideas reality. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

EDUC 119S: History of American Indian & Alaska Native Education (EDUC 429S, NATIVEAM 119S)

How the federal government placed education at the center of its Indian policy in second half of 19th century, subjecting Native Americans to programs designed to erase native cultures and American Indian responses to those programs. Topics include traditional Indian education, role of religious groups, Meriam Report, Navajo-Hopi Rehabilitation Act, Johnson-O'Malley Act, and public schools.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

EDUC 137: The Role of Policy in Shaping U.S. Education: Early Childhood through High School

We will explore current issues in preK-12 education policy including the expansion of early childhood programs, the effectiveness of accountability, the challenges facing teacher labor markets, and the financing of education. We discuss the role government and non-government agencies have (or should have) in making and evaluating education policies. In all discussions, we will call attention to the vast inequities that exist in our current education system. In this course, you will learn how to analyze and critique education policies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
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