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11 - 20 of 56 results for: ECON ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 124: Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia (INTLPOL 224)

(Formerly IPS 224) This course explores East Asia's rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, such as, political economy, human capital, inequality, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles. Prerequisites: INTPOL 301B, Polisci150A(355A), Econ 102B or equivalent courses that cover regression analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

ECON 131: The Chinese Economy

This is a survey course of the Chinese economy with emphasis on understanding the process of economic reform, transition and development during the past 40 years. It will help students learn the different historical stages of institutional changes, develop an informed perspective on economic and political rationale and the effectiveness of the economic policies that have shaped China's economic emergence, and think critically about the process of economic and social changes. Prerequisite: Econ 1.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ECON 136: Market Design

Use of economic theory and analysis to design allocation mechanisms and market institutions. Course focuses on three areas: the design of matching algorithms to solve assignment problems, with applications to school choice, entry-level labor markets, and kidney exchanges; the design of auctions to solve general resource allocation problems, with applications to the sale of natural resources, financial assets, radio spectrum, and advertising; and the design of platforms and exchanges, with applications to internet markets. Emphasis on connecting economic theory to practical applications. Students must write term paper.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR
Instructors: Milgrom, P. (PI)

ECON 139D: Directed Reading

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Abramitzky, R. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Alsan, M. (PI) ; Amador, M. (PI) ; Amemiya, T. (PI) ; Arora, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Attanasio, O. (PI) ; Auclert, A. (PI) ; Bagwell, K. (PI) ; Baron, D. (PI) ; Bekaert, G. (PI) ; Bernheim, B. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Bloom, N. (PI) ; Bocola, L. (PI) ; Boskin, M. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Bresnahan, T. (PI) ; Brest, P. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Canellos, C. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Chan, D. (PI) ; Chandrasekhar, A. (PI) ; Chaudhary, L. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Chetty, R. (PI) ; Clerici-Arias, M. (PI) ; Cogan, J. (PI) ; David, P. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Donohue, J. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Duggan, M. (PI) ; Dupas, P. (PI) ; Einav, L. (PI) ; Fafchamps, M. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fearon, J. (PI) ; Fetter, D. (PI) ; Fitzpatrick, M. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Fuchs, V. (PI) ; Garber, A. (PI) ; Gentzkow, M. (PI) ; Goda, G. (PI) ; Gould, A. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Greif, A. (PI) ; Haak, D. (PI) ; Haber, S. (PI) ; Hall, R. (PI) ; Hamilton, J. (PI) ; Hammond, P. (PI) ; Hanson, W. (PI) ; Hanushek, E. (PI) ; Harris, D. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Henry, P. (PI) ; Hickman, B. (PI) ; Hong, H. (PI) ; Hope, N. (PI) ; Horvath, M. (PI) ; Hoxby, C. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jackson, M. (PI) ; Jagolinzer, A. (PI) ; Jarosch, G. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Jost, J. (PI) ; Judd, K. (PI) ; Kehoe, P. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Klausner, M. (PI) ; Klenow, P. (PI) ; Kochar, A. (PI) ; Kojima, F. (PI) ; Kolstad, C. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Krueger, A. (PI) ; Kuran, T. (PI) ; Kurlat, P. (PI) ; Kurz, M. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larsen, B. (PI) ; Lau, L. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Leeson, R. (PI) ; Levin, J. (PI) ; Lynham, J. (PI) ; MaCurdy, T. (PI) ; Malmendier, U. (PI) ; McClellan, M. (PI) ; McKeon, S. (PI) ; Meier, G. (PI) ; Milgrom, P. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Morten, M. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Nechyba, T. (PI) ; Niederle, M. (PI) ; Noll, R. (PI) ; Owen, B. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Pencavel, J. (PI) ; Persson, P. (PI) ; Piazzesi, M. (PI) ; Pistaferri, L. (PI) ; Polinsky, A. (PI) ; Qian, Y. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Richards, J. (PI) ; Roberts, J. (PI) ; Romano, J. (PI) ; Romer, P. (PI) ; Rosenberg, N. (PI) ; Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI) ; Rosston, G. (PI) ; Roth, A. (PI) ; Royalty, A. (PI) ; Rozelle, S. (PI) ; Sargent, T. (PI) ; Schaffner, J. (PI) ; Schneider, M. (PI) ; Segal, I. (PI) ; Sharpe, W. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Shoven, J. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorkin, I. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Tendall, M. (PI) ; Topper, M. (PI) ; Vytlacil, E. (PI) ; Wacziarg, R. (PI) ; Weingast, B. (PI) ; Williams, H. (PI) ; Wilson, R. (PI) ; Wolak, F. (PI) ; Wolitzky, A. (PI) ; Wright, G. (PI) ; Wright, M. (PI) ; Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 144: Family and Society

Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Persson, P. (PI)

ECON 149: The Modern Firm in Theory and Practice

Examines the empirics on the economics, management and strategy of organizations (e.g. firms). Topics include the organization of firms in US and internationally. Management practices around information systems, target setting and human resources. Focus on management practices in manufacturing, but also analyze retail, hospitals and schools, plus some recent field-experiments in developing countries. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51), ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Bloom, N. (PI)

ECON 150: Economic Policy Analysis (PUBLPOL 104, PUBLPOL 204)

The relationship between microeconomic analysis and public policy making. How economic policy analysis is done and why political leaders regard it as useful but not definitive in making policy decisions. Economic rationales for policy interventions, methods of policy evaluation and the role of benefit-cost analysis, economic models of politics and their application to policy making, and the relationship of income distribution to policy choice. Theoretical foundations of policy making and analysis, and applications to program adoption and implementation. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to take this class for a letter grade and enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Goulder, L. (PI)

ECON 162: Games Developing Nations Play (POLISCI 247A, POLISCI 347A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weingast, B. (PI)
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