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81 - 90 of 147 results for: ECON

ECON 226: U.S. Economic History

The role of economic history as a distinctive approach to the study of economics, using illustrations from U.S. history. Topics: historical and institutional foundations of the U.S. rise to world economic preeminence; economic causes and consequences of slavery; the American national system of technology; the Great Depression of the 1930s; national economic performance in a globalizing world. Intended for graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 227: European Economic History

European Economic History: covers topics in European Economic History from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century (but does not cover detailed economic history of particular European countries). Topics include competing hypotheses in explaining long term trends in economic growth and cross-country differences in long-term economic growth; the diffusion of knowledge; the formation, function, and persistence of institutions and organizations; the role of institutions and organizations (for example, apprenticeship, servitude, partnerships, cooperatives, social networks, share cropping, and communes) as solutions to contractual problems; the causes and consequences of income inequality; the economics of migration; the changing economic role of the family. The course will highlight the use of economic theory in guiding hypothesis testing, as well as the construction of new datasets and the execution of empirical analysis. Enrollment limited to graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ECON 228: Institutions and Organizations in Historical Perspective

The course integrates historical analysis and economic theory in evaluating the nature and role of institutions in economic and political outcomes. The motivating question is the factors determining economic and political developments in the long run and the historical focus is on the Middle East, Europe, and China over the last millennium. The course first examines various approaches for the study of institutions, their nature and dynamics and then focuses on detailed discussions of frontier research papers.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

ECON 229: Topics in Economic History

Emphasis is on institutions and organizations, such as risk-sharing organizations, and property rights, such as patent laws and their effects on technological change and economic growth. Topics include: competing hypotheses for cross-country differences in long-term growth; the importance of institutions to economic growth; formation, function, and persistence of institutions and organizations; role of patent laws in creating incentives for innovation; informal networks as a mechanism to trade property rights; causes and effects of institutional change; tests of contract theory in history; and long-term migration and its effect on economic development.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 231: Analytics of Global Economic Externalities under Uncertainty

Fundamentally important issues for theoretical analysis of macro-dynamical systems with global externalities are the focus of this course's 9 (weekly) meetings: (i) public goods (e.g., information) and public bads (uncontrolled GHG emissions), (ii) sequential decision-making under uncertainty (e.g., multi-period investment programs, and management of evolving technology portfolios), and (iii) time discounting, allowing for rare events and catastrophic risks. Novel approaches to program designs for global climate stabilization, sustainable use of resources and the future adaptation of market mechanisms (e.g., carbon markets, and markets for potable water.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ECON 233: Advanced Macroeconomics I

Topics in the theory and empirics of economic growth. For PhD-level students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 234: Advanced Macroeconomics II

The first half of this class covers topics in monetary economics. We cover empirical evidence, neoclassical models, models of price setting, recent advances in New Keynesian models, and monetary policy with heterogeneous agents. The second half of the course covers labor-macro topics, with emphasis on the Diamond-Mortensen-Pissarides class of models and related topics. This will cover the issues of employment volatility and the driving forces of employment fluctuations, including financial shocks. The course will be organized around the detailed study of recent research papers. Some lectures will be given by visiting macroeconomists.Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the economics department's core macro requirement or consent of the instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5

ECON 235: Advanced Macroeconomics III

Current topics to prepare student for research in the field. Recent research in labor-market friction, reallocation, fluctuations, wage and price determination, innovation, and productivity growth. Research methods, presentations skills, and writing in advanced economics.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ECON 236: Financial Economics I

This course will cover research topics at the boundary between macroeconomics and finance. Topics may include the study of macroeconomic models with financial frictions, conventional and unconventional monetary policy, its transmission mechanism and the term structure of interest rates, sovereign debt crises, search frictions and segmentation in housing markets, (over)leveraging by households, heterogeneous expectations, excess volatility, financial bubbles and crises. Prerequisites: 210, 211, 212.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 237: Financial Economics II (MGTECON 617)

This Ph.D. course will cover research topics at the boundary between macroeconomics and finance. Topics will include the study of macroeconomic models with financial frictions, the term structure of interest rates, conventional and unconventional monetary policy, sovereign debt crises, search frictions and segmentation in housing markets, (over)leveraging by households, heterogeneous expectations, excess volatility, financial bubbles and crises. Student presentations and course paper requirement. Designed for second year PhD students in economics or finance.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5
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