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111 - 120 of 147 results for: ECON

ECON 270: Intermediate Econometrics I

Probability, random variables, and distributions; large sample theory; theory of estimation and hypothesis testing. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: math and probability at the level of Chapter 2, Paul G. Hoel, Introduction to Mathematical Statistics, 5th ed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 271: Intermediate Econometrics II

Analysis of Randomized Experiments, Linear Regression Model, Instrumental Variables, Methods for Causal Effects. Prerequisite: Econ 270 or MGTECON 603 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Imbens, G. (PI)

ECON 272: Intermediate Econometrics III

Simultaneous equation models, nonlinear estimation and testing, linear time series analysis, structural modeling. Prerequisites: Econ 271 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5

ECON 273: Advanced Econometrics I

Possible topics: parametric asymptotic theory. M and Z estimators. General large sample results for maximum likelihood; nonlinear least squares; and nonlinear instrumental variables estimators including the generalized method of moments estimator under general conditions. Model selection test. Consistent model selection criteria. Nonnested hypothesis testing. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Nonparametric and semiparametric methods. Quantile Regression methods.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ECON 274: Advanced Econometrics II

(Formerly 273B); Possible topics: nonparametric density estimation and regression analysis; sieve approximation; contiguity; convergence of experiments; cross validation; indirect inference; resampling methods: bootstrap and subsampling; quantile regression; nonstandard asymptotic distribution theory; empirical processes; set identification and inference, large sample efficiency and optimality; multiple hypothesis testing.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ECON 275: Economics-Based Econometrics

This course presents methods for constructing econometric specifications and systems directly based on economic models. One such approach formulates stochastic economic models that give rise to empirically implementable econometric models. The discussion will cover methods for estimating, diagnostic testing, and drawing inferences about the underlying economic primitives, including both parametric and non-parametric identification of economic structures. Applications include models from all fields of empirical microeconomics¿Labor, Industrial Organization, Public Finance, and Energy and Environmental Economics. Examples include: consumer demand models integrating corner solutions, intertemporal models of household and firm behavior, and dynamic models of single and multi-agent interactions with complete and incomplete information. The major theme of the course is to present a general framework for economic theory-based empirical research that allows researchers to recover the underlying economic primitives driving observed outcomes of an economic environment. Prerequisites: Econ 202, 203, 204, 270, 271, 272.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ECON 276: Computational Econometrics

Theory and computational methods necessary to implement state-of-the-art econometric methods used in theory-based empirical work. Topics covered include: computation of nonlinear M-estimators subject to equality and inequality constraints, simulation estimators, indirect inference, Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, resampling (bootstrap and sub-sampling) methods for estimation and inference, dynamic discrete choice models, continuous and discrete mixture models and estimation and inference for partially identified models.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ECON 278: Behavioral and Experimental Economics I

This is the first half of a three course sequence (along with Econ 279 & 280-formerly 277) on behavioral and experimental economics. The sequence has two main objectives: 1) examines theories and evidence related to the psychology of economic decision making, 2) Introduces methods of experimental economics, and explores major subject areas (including those not falling within behavioral economics) that have been addressed through laboratory experiments. Focuses on series of experiments that build on one another in an effort to test between competing theoretical frameworks, with the objects of improving the explanatory and predictive performance of standard models, and of providing a foundation for more reliable normative analyses of policy issues. Prerequisites: 204 and 271, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 279: Behavioral and Experimental Economics II

This is part of a three course sequence (along with Econ 278 & 280-formerly 277) on behavioral and experimental economics. The sequence has two main objectives: 1) examines theories and evidence related to the psychology of economic decision making, 2) Introduces methods of experimental economics, and explores major subject areas (including those not falling within behavioral economics) that have been addressed through laboratory experiments. Focuses on series of experiments that build on one another in an effort to test between competing theoretical frameworks, with the objects of improving the explanatory and predictive performance of standard models, and of providing a foundation for more reliable normative analyses of policy issues. Prerequisites: 204 and 271, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5

ECON 280: Behavioral and Experimental Economics III

Economics 280 (formerly ECON 277) is a course primarily directed at graduate students in the Economics department writing dissertations with behavioral or experimental components. Economics 280 is the third part of a three course sequence (along with Econ 278 & 279). The first two quarters, which are taught primarily in lecture format, have two main objectives: 1) examining theories and evidence related to the psychology of economic decision making; 2) introducing methods of experimental economics, and exploring major subject areas (including those not falling within behavioral economics) that have been addressed through laboratory experiments. Focuses on series of experiments that build on one another in an effort to test between competing theoretical frameworks, with the objectives of improving the explanatory and predictive performance of standard models, and of providing a foundation for more reliable normative analyses of policy issues. This third quarter is a practicum, focused on students who have taken (at least one of) the first two quarters and who are now preparing an experimental or behavioral study of their own. Prerequisites: Non-Econ Phd students must complete 204 and 271, or have consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5
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