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101 - 110 of 147 results for: ECON

ECON 251: Natural Resource and Energy Economics

Economic theory and empirical analysis of non-renewable and renewable natural resources, with considerable attention to energy provision and use. Topics include: exhaustible resources; renewable resources; and energy industry market structure, pricing, and performance. Prerequisites: 202, 203, 204, 271, and 272, or equivalents with consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ECON 252: The Future of Finance (ECON 152, PUBLPOL 364)

(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today inclu more »
(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructors the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Beder, T. (PI)

ECON 255: Economics of Communication

This course will cover theoretical and empirical work on the provision of information in markets. Likely topics include: theory of strategic communication; persuasion; media; advertising and brands; financial analysis and disclosure; political communication; text analysis using machine learning and natural language processing methods. Prerequisites: Econ 202 and 210 (or equivalent)
Last offered: Spring 2019

ECON 257: Industrial Organization 1

Theoretical and empirical analyses of the determinants of market structure; firm behavior and market efficiency in oligopolies; price discrimination; price dispersion and consumer search; differentiated products; the role of information in markets, including insurance and adverse selection; auctions; collusion and cartel behavior; advertising; entry and market structure; market dynamics; strategic behavior.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 258: Industrial Organization IIA

Topics may include theoretical and empirical analysis of bargaining, dynamic models of entry and investment, models of markets with asymmetric information, advertising, brands, and markets for information, and research at the boundaries between IO and neighboring fields such as trade and behavioral economics. Prerequisite: Econ 257.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5

ECON 260: Industrial Organization III

Course combines individual meetings and student presentations, with an aim of initiating dissertation research in industrial organization. Prerequisites: ECON 257, ECON 258.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5

ECON 266: International Trade I

The first part of this course covers Ricardian, factor-proportions and monopolistic-competition models of international trade. The second part of the course covers commercial policy, with an emphasis on the economics of trade agreements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Bagwell, K. (PI)

ECON 267: International Trade II

The course will cover quantitative and empirical work in trade, trade policy, and related subjects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Grant, M. (PI)

ECON 268: International Finance and Exchange Rates

Benchmark open economy models. Solution methods for macroeconomic models. Analysis and evaluation of quantitative macroeconomic models. Main applications: Sovereign debt and default; Financial crises and sudden stops; Hedging, interest parity relationships, and the determination of exchange rates; Liability dollarization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Bocola, L. (PI)

ECON 269: International Finance and Exchange Rates II

This is the second half of the international finance sequence. Part I: intertemporal approach to the current account, international real business cycle models, international risk-sharing, gains from financial integration, global imbalances, and exchange rate determination. Part 2: open-economy monetary models and currency unions. Part 3: international finance policy, capital controls and foreign exchange interventions. Part 4: sovereign debt. . Prerequisites: Econ 210, 211, 212 and 268.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Kehoe, P. (PI)
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