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31 - 40 of 50 results for: ECON ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ECON 270: Intermediate Econometrics I

Probability, random variables, and distributions; large sample theory; theory of estimation and hypothesis testing. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: math and probability at the level of Chapter 2, Paul G. Hoel, Introduction to Mathematical Statistics, 5th ed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Romano, J. (PI)

ECON 278: Behavioral and Experimental Economics I

This is the first half of a three course sequence (along with Econ 279 & 280-formerly 277) on behavioral and experimental economics. The sequence has two main objectives: 1) examines theories and evidence related to the psychology of economic decision making, 2) Introduces methods of experimental economics, and explores major subject areas (including those not falling within behavioral economics) that have been addressed through laboratory experiments. Focuses on series of experiments that build on one another in an effort to test between competing theoretical frameworks, with the objects of improving the explanatory and predictive performance of standard models, and of providing a foundation for more reliable normative analyses of policy issues. Prerequisites: 204 and 271, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 285: Matching and Market Design

This is an introduction to market design, intended mainly for second year PhD students in economics (but also open to other graduates students from around the university and to undergrads who have taken undergrad market design). It will emphasize the combined use of economic theory, experiments and empirical analysis to analyze and engineer market rules and institutions. In this first quarter we will pay particular attention to matching markets, which are those in which price doesn't do all of the work, and which include some kind of application or selection process. In recent years market designers have participated in the design and implementation of a number of marketplaces, and the course will emphasize the relation between theory and practice, for example in the design of labor market clearinghouses for American doctors, and school choice programs in a growing number of American cities (including New York and Boston), and the allocation of organs for transplantation. Various forms more »
This is an introduction to market design, intended mainly for second year PhD students in economics (but also open to other graduates students from around the university and to undergrads who have taken undergrad market design). It will emphasize the combined use of economic theory, experiments and empirical analysis to analyze and engineer market rules and institutions. In this first quarter we will pay particular attention to matching markets, which are those in which price doesn't do all of the work, and which include some kind of application or selection process. In recent years market designers have participated in the design and implementation of a number of marketplaces, and the course will emphasize the relation between theory and practice, for example in the design of labor market clearinghouses for American doctors, and school choice programs in a growing number of American cities (including New York and Boston), and the allocation of organs for transplantation. Various forms of market failure will also be discussed.nAssignment: One final paper. The objective of the final paper is to study an existing market or an environment with a potential role for a market, describe the relevant market design questions, and evaluate how the current market design works and/or propose improvements on the current design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 286: Game Theory and Economic Applications

Aims to provide a solid basis in game-theoretic tools and concepts, both for theorists and for students focusing in other fields. Technical material will include solution concepts and refinements, potential games, supermodular games, repeated games, reputation, and bargaining models. The class will also address some foundational issues, such as epistemic and evolutionary modeling.Prerequisite: 203 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)

ECON 292: Quantitative Methods for Empirical Research

This is an advanced course on quantitative methods for empirical research. Students are expected to have taken a course in linear models before. In this course I will discuss modern econometric methods for nonlinear models, including maximum likelihood and generalized method of moments. The emphasis will be on how these methods are used in sophisticated empirical work in social sciences. Special topics include discrete choice models and methods for estimating treatment effects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 299: Practical Training

Students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Abramitzky, R. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Amador, M. (PI) ; Amemiya, T. (PI) ; Aoki, M. (PI) ; Arora, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Attanasio, O. (PI) ; Auclert, A. (PI) ; Bagwell, K. (PI) ; Baron, D. (PI) ; Bekaert, G. (PI) ; Bernheim, B. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Blimpo, M. (PI) ; Bloom, N. (PI) ; Boskin, M. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Bresnahan, T. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Canellos, C. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Chandrasekhar, A. (PI) ; Chaudhary, L. (PI) ; Chetty, R. (PI) ; Clerici-Arias, M. (PI) ; Cogan, J. (PI) ; Cojoc, D. (PI) ; David, P. (PI) ; DeGiorgi, G. (PI) ; Dickstein, M. (PI) ; Donaldson, D. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Duggan, M. (PI) ; Dupas, P. (PI) ; Einav, L. (PI) ; Fafchamps, M. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fitzgerald, D. (PI) ; Fitzpatrick, M. (PI) ; Fong, K. (PI) ; Fuchs, V. (PI) ; Garber, A. (PI) ; Gentzkow, M. (PI) ; Gould, A. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Greif, A. (PI) ; Haak, D. (PI) ; Haber, S. (PI) ; Hall, R. (PI) ; Hamilton, J. (PI) ; Hammond, P. (PI) ; Hansen, P. (PI) ; Hanson, W. (PI) ; Hanushek, E. (PI) ; Harding, M. (PI) ; Harris, D. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Henry, P. (PI) ; Hickman, B. (PI) ; Hong, H. (PI) ; Hope, N. (PI) ; Horvath, M. (PI) ; Hoxby, C. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jackson, M. (PI) ; Jagolinzer, A. (PI) ; Jaimovich, N. (PI) ; Jarosch, G. (PI) ; Jayachandran, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Jost, J. (PI) ; Judd, K. (PI) ; Kastl, J. (PI) ; Kehoe, P. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Klenow, P. (PI) ; Kochar, A. (PI) ; Kojima, F. (PI) ; Kolstad, C. (PI) ; Krueger, A. (PI) ; Kuran, T. (PI) ; Kurlat, P. (PI) ; Kurz, M. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larsen, B. (PI) ; Lau, L. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Levin, J. (PI) ; MaCurdy, T. (PI) ; Mahajan, A. (PI) ; Malmendier, U. (PI) ; Manova, K. (PI) ; McClellan, M. (PI) ; McKeon, S. (PI) ; McKinnon, R. (PI) ; Meier, G. (PI) ; Milgrom, P. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Morten, M. (PI) ; Moser, P. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Nechyba, T. (PI) ; Niederle, M. (PI) ; Noll, R. (PI) ; Owen, B. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Pencavel, J. (PI) ; Persson, P. (PI) ; Piazzesi, M. (PI) ; Pistaferri, L. (PI) ; Polinsky, A. (PI) ; Qian, Y. (PI) ; Rangel, A. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Richards, J. (PI) ; Roberts, J. (PI) ; Romano, J. (PI) ; Romer, P. (PI) ; Rosenberg, N. (PI) ; Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI) ; Rosston, G. (PI) ; Roth, A. (PI) ; Rothwell, G. (PI) ; Royalty, A. (PI) ; Rozelle, S. (PI) ; Sargent, T. (PI) ; Schaffner, J. (PI) ; Scheuer, F. (PI) ; Schneider, M. (PI) ; Segal, I. (PI) ; Sharpe, W. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Shoven, J. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorkin, I. (PI) ; Sprenger, C. (PI) ; Staiger, R. (PI) ; Stanton, F. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Tendall, M. (PI) ; Tertilt, M. (PI) ; Topper, M. (PI) ; Vytlacil, E. (PI) ; Wacziarg, R. (PI) ; Weingast, B. (PI) ; Wilson, R. (PI) ; Wolak, F. (PI) ; Wolitzky, A. (PI) ; Wright, G. (PI) ; Wright, M. (PI) ; Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 300: Third-Year Seminar

Restricted to Economics Ph.D. students. Students present current research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 310: Macroeconomic Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 315: Development Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 325: Economic History Workshop

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
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