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61 - 70 of 167 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 133: Social Enterprise Workshop (URBANST 133)

Social Enterprise Workshop: A team based class to design solutions to social issues. In the class students will identify issues they are interested in, such as housing, food, the environment, or college access. They will join teams of like-minded students. Working under the guidance of an experienced social entrepreneur, together they will develop a solution to one part of their issue and write a business plan for that solution. The class will also feature guests who are leaders in the field of social entrepreneurship who will share their stories and help with the business plans. The business plan exercise can be used for both nonprofits and for-profits. Previous students have started successful organizations and raised significant funds based on the business plans developed in this class. There are no prerequisites, and students do not need to have an idea for a social enterprise to join the class. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Scher, L. (PI)

EARTHSYS 135B: Waste Politics: Contesting Toxicity, Value, and Power (ANTHRO 135B, ANTHRO 235B)

Waste is increasingly central as an object and medium of political contestation in the contemporary world, from struggles over garbage, labor, and dignity in Senegal; to explosive remnants of war acting as rogue infrastructure in the Korean demilitarized zone. In response, waste has also become a productive concept in the environmental humanities and humanistic social sciences. In this course we will read a selection of foundational texts focused on waste, many of which draw on case studies from different parts of the world. The case of China will be emphasized, however, since China has emerged in the last few decades as a center not only of global industrial production, but also for processing the world¿s waste, contesting pollution, and fighting for environmental justice. By pairing key theoretical texts with texts dealing with waste-related issues in China and elsewhere, we will ultimately ask how contemporary global waste politics disrupts western understandings of waste, recycling, value, and more.
Last offered: Winter 2019

EARTHSYS 136: The Ethics of Stewardship (EARTHSYS 236)

What responsibilities do humans have to nonhuman nature and future generations? How are human communities and individuals shaped by their relationships with the natural world? What are the social, political, and moral ramifications of drawing sustenance and wealth from natural resources? Whether we realize it or not, we grapple with such questions every time we turn on the tap, fuel up cars, or eat meals -and they are key to addressing issues like global climate change and environmental justice. In this class, we consider several perspectives on this ethical question of stewardship: the role of humans in the global environment. In addition to reading written work and speaking with land stewards, we will practice stewardship at the Stanford Educational Farm. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

EARTHSYS 137: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector (URBANST 132)

How to develop and grow innovative not-for-profit organizations and for-profit enterprises which have the primary goal of solving social and environmental problems. Topics include organizational mission, strategy, market/user analysis, communications, funding, recruitment and impact evaluation. Perspectives from the field of social entrepreneurship, design thinking and social change organizing. Opportunities and limits of using methods from the for-profit sector to meet social goals. Focus is on integrating theory with practical applications, including several case exercises and simulations.One-day practicum where students advise an actual social impact organization. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite:consent of instructor. Email lalitvak@stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

EARTHSYS 138: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (CEE 126, INTLPOL 274, URBANST 145)

(formerly IPS 274) Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 139: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, BIO 238, EARTHSYS 239)

This course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins and then a primary focus on its recent development and frontiers. The principal aim of the course is to enable new research and real-world applications of InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) tools and approaches. We will discuss the interconnections between people and nature and key research frontiers, such as in the realms of biodiversity, resilience, human health, poverty alleviation, and sustainable development. The science we¿ll explore is in the service of decisions, and we will use examples from real life to illustrate why this science is so critical to informing why, where, how, and how much people need nature. Prerequisite. Basic to intermediate GIS skills are required (including working with raster, vector and tabular data; loading and editing rasters, shapefiles, and tables into a GIS; understanding coordinate systems; and performing basic raster math).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 140: Data science for geoscience (EARTHSYS 240, ENERGY 240, ESS 239, GEOLSCI 140, GEOLSCI 240)

Overview of some of the most important data science methods (statistics, machine learning & computer vision) relevant for geological sciences, as well as other fields in the Earth Sciences. Areas covered are: extreme value statistics for predicting rare events; compositional data analysis for geochemistry; multivariate analysis for designing data & computer experiments; probabilistic aggregation of evidence for spatial mapping; functional data analysis for multivariate environmental datasets, spatial regression and modeling spatial uncertainty with covariate information (geostatistics). Identification & learning of geo-objects with computer vision. Focus on practicality rather than theory. Matlab exercises on realistic data problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 141: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 241, ESS 141, ESS 241, GEOPHYS 141)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR

EARTHSYS 142: Remote Sensing of Land (EARTHSYS 242, ESS 162, ESS 262)

The use of satellite remote sensing to monitor land use and land cover, with emphasis on terrestrial changes. Topics include pre-processing data, biophysical properties of vegetation observable by satellite, accuracy assessment of maps derived from remote sensing, and methodologies to detect changes such as urbanization, deforestation, vegetation health, and wildfires.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Lyons, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 143: Molecular Geomicrobiology Laboratory (BIO 142, ESS 143, ESS 243)

In this course, students will be studying the biosynthesis of cyclic lipid biomarkers, molecules that are produced by modern microbes that can be preserved in rocks that are over a billion years old and which geologist use as molecular fossils. Students will be tasked with identifying potential biomarker lipid synthesis genes in environmental genomic databases, expressing those genes in a model bacterial expression system in the lab, and then analyzing the lipid products that are produced. The overall goal is for students to experience the scientific research process including generating hypotheses, testing these hypotheses in laboratory experiments, and communicating their results through a publication style paper. Prerequisites: BIO83 and CHEM35 or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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