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151 - 160 of 172 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 272: Antarctic Marine Geology and Geophysics (ESS 242)

For upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Intermediate and advanced topics in marine geology and geophysics, focusing on examples from the Antarctic continental margin and adjacent Southern Ocean. Topics: glaciers, icebergs, and sea ice as geologic agents (glacial and glacial marine sedimentology, Southern Ocean current systems and deep ocean sedimentation), Antarctic biostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy (continental margin evolution). Students interpret seismic lines and sediment core/well log data. Examples from a recent scientific drilling expedition to Prydz Bay, Antarctica.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

EARTHSYS 276: Open Space Management Practicum (EARTHSYS 176)

The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the East Bay Regional Parks District. Grass Roots Ecology or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research desig more »
The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the East Bay Regional Parks District. Grass Roots Ecology or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in conservation biology and ecology, community and stakeholder engagement, land use policy and planning, and the practical aspects of land and environmental management.nnAll students must complete the course application and turn it into Rachel Engstrand (rce212@stanford.edu) and Briana Swette (bswette@stanford.edu) by email. To receive priority consideration and an enrollment code, please submit the application by Monday September 10th, 2018. The course application consists of a short paragraph about your background and interest in and preparation for working on a real-world community-engaged earth systems project. The total course enrollment is necessarily limited by the project-based nature of the class.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

EARTHSYS 276A: Open Space Practicum Independent Study

Additional practicum units for students intent on continuing their projects from EARTHSYS 276. Students who enroll in 276A must have completed EARTHSYS 276: Open Space Management Practicum, or have consent of the instructors.
Last offered: Winter 2018

EARTHSYS 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4

EARTHSYS 286: Farm and Garden Environmental Education Practicum (EARTHSYS 186)

Farms and gardens provide excellent settings for place-based environmental education that emphasize human ecological relationships and experiential learning. The O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm is the setting to explore the principles and practices of farm and garden-based education in conjunction with the farm's new field trip program for local youth. The course includes readings and reflections on environmental education and emphasis on learning by doing, engaging students in the practice of team teaching. Application required. Deadline: March 14.nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9SPufdULCh93rbT
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Archie, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 288: Social and Environmental Tradeoffs in Climate Decision-Making (EARTHSYS 188)

How can we ensure that measures taken to mitigate global climate change don't create larger social and environmental problems? What metrics should be used to compare potential climate solutions beyond cost and technical feasibility, and how should these metrics be weighed against each other? How can modeling efforts and stakeholder engagement be best integrated into climate decision making? What information are we still missing to make fully informed decisions between technologies and policies? Exploration of these questions, alongside other issues related to potential negative externalities of emerging climate solutions. Evaluation of energy, land use, and geoengineering approaches in an integrated context, culminating in a climate stabilization group project.
Last offered: Winter 2019

EARTHSYS 289: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation (SUST 231)

FEED Lab is a course in which entrepreneurial and motivated students, engaged industry-thought leaders, and deeply experienced and connected faculty work together to design solutions to some of the food system's most consequential problems. Whether you're passionate about transforming the food system, or merely curious explore it, all students in this course will leave with practical design skills, enhanced leadership abilities, and confidence that their work will leave a lasting impact on the organizations with whom we collaborate. Students who complete this course gain access to the broad network of the FEED Collaborative, whose mission is to equip and inspire the next generation of leaders in the food system, and to connect them to meaningful opportunities after Stanford. To learn more about the FEED Collaborative, visit https://feedcollab.stanford.edu/. This course requires an application, which can be found here: https://forms.gle/5Rd93yVg8XjRCig26
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

EARTHSYS 289A: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation

FEED Lab is a 3-4 unit introductory course in design thinking and food system innovation offered through the FEED Collaborative. Targeted at graduate students interested in food and the food system, this course provides a series of diverse, primarily hands-on experiences (design projects with industry-leading thinkers, field work, and collaborative leadership development) in which students both learn and apply the process of human-centered design to projects of real consequence in the food system. The intent of this course is to develop students' creative confidence, collaborative leadership ability, and skills in systems thinking to prepare them to be more effective as innovators and leaders in the food system. This course is mandatory for any student wishing to qualify for the FEED Collaborative's summer Leadership and Innovation Program, in which select students participate in full-time, paid, externship roles with collaborating thought-leaders in the industry. Admission is by application: http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/.
Last offered: Winter 2018

EARTHSYS 289B: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation

Primarily a follow-on course to EARTHSYS 289A, this course is an experiential education platform that enables students already experienced in design thinking to collaborate with faculty and industry thought-leaders on projects of real consequence in the local food system. A select cohort of students will work in small, diverse teams and will interact closely with the teaching team in an intentionally creative and informal classroom setting. Students will deepen their skills in design thinking and social entrepreneurship by working on projects sponsored by leading innovators in the FEED Collaborative's network. Some projects may turn into summer internships or research projects for students interested in continuing their work. Admission is by application: http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/.

EARTHSYS 290: Master's Seminar

Required of and open only to Earth Systems co-terminal MS and MA students. This course has several elements, including, skill building through experiential learning and reflection and professional development. Students will work in teams with a community partner to complete a well-defined, manageable, but important project. Our community partners have requested help with achieving their missions and seminar students will utilize their backgrounds in social/environmental problem solving to deliver a final product. Our partners have requested help with such efforts as grant writing, data analysis, curriculum development, symposium organizing, presentation research and preparation and communications to raise awareness about an environmental challenge. Students will also explore how best to communicate their interdisciplinary skills and goals through their resumes, cv¿s or cover letters, portfolios or linkedIn profiles in preparation for the next phase of their career. Guest speakers and an in class simulation will complement these activities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2
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