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141 - 150 of 173 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 249: Wild Writing (EARTHSYS 149)

What is wilderness and why does it matter? In this course we will interrogate answers to this question articulated by influential and diverse American environmental thinkers of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, who through their writing transformed public perceptions of wilderness and inspired such actions as the founding of the National Park System, the passage of the Wilderness Act and the Clean Air and Water Acts, the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the birth of the environmental and climate justice movements. Students will also develop their own responses to the question of what is wilderness and why it matters through a series of writing exercises that integrate personal narrative, wilderness experience, and environmental scholarship, culminating in a ~3000 word narrative nonfiction essay. This course will provide students with knowledge, tools, experience, and skills that will empower them to become more persuasive environmental storytellers and advocates.nnIf you are interested in signing up for the course, complete this pre-registration form https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9XqZeZs036WIvop
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 250: Directed Research

Independent research. Student develops own project with faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Arrigo, K. (PI) ; Asner, G. (PI) ; Benson, S. (PI) ; Block, B. (PI) ; Boggs, C. (PI) ; Boucher, A. (PI) ; Cain, B. (PI) ; Caldwell, M. (PI) ; Carlisle, L. (PI) ; Casciotti, K. (PI) ; Chamberlain, P. (PI) ; Curran, L. (PI) ; Daily, G. (PI) ; Davis, J. (PI) ; Denny, M. (PI) ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI) ; Dirzo, R. (PI) ; Dunbar, R. (PI) ; Durham, W. (PI) ; Egger, A. (PI) ; Ehrlich, P. (PI) ; Ernst, W. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fendorf, S. (PI) ; Field, C. (PI) ; Francis, C. (PI) ; Frank, Z. (PI) ; Freyberg, D. (PI) ; Fukami, T. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gerritsen, M. (PI) ; Gilly, W. (PI) ; Gordon, D. (PI) ; Gorelick, S. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Hadly, E. (PI) ; Hayden, T. (PI) ; Hilley, G. (PI) ; Hoagland, S. (PI) ; Ingle, J. (PI) ; Jamieson, A. (PI) ; Jones, J. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, J. (PI) ; Knight, R. (PI) ; Konings, A. (PI) ; Koseff, J. (PI) ; Kovscek, A. (PI) ; Lambin, E. (PI) ; Litvak, L. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Long, S. (PI) ; Lynham, J. (PI) ; Masters, G. (PI) ; Matson, P. (PI) ; Micheli, F. (PI) ; Milroy, C. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mooney, H. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Nevle, R. (PI) ; Orr, F. (PI) ; Palumbi, S. (PI) ; Payne, J. (PI) ; Peay, K. (PI) ; Phillips, K. (PI) ; Rajaratnam, B. (PI) ; Root, T. (PI) ; Rothe, M. (PI) ; Schneider, S. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Seto, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Somero, G. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Switzer, P. (PI) ; Tabazadeh, A. (PI) ; Thomas, L. (PI) ; Thompson, B. (PI) ; Victor, D. (PI) ; Vitousek, P. (PI) ; Walbot, V. (PI) ; Watanabe, J. (PI) ; Weyant, J. (PI) ; Wiederkehr, S. (PI) ; Wilber, C. (PI) ; Woodward, J. (PI) ; Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 251: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 151, ESS 151, ESS 251)

Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 252: Marine Chemistry (EARTHSYS 152, ESS 152, ESS 252)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate problems in marine chemistry and related disciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine the chemical composition of seawater. Air-sea gas exchange, carbonate chemistry, and chemical equilibria, nutrient and trace element cycling, particle reactivity, sediment chemistry, and diagenesis. Examination of chemical tracers of mixing and circulation and feedbacks of ocean processes on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Designed to be taken concurrently with Biological Oceanography (ESS/ EARTHSYS 151/251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

EARTHSYS 254: Environmental Governance (ENVRES 250)

How do we work together to solve environmental problems? Across the globe, who has a voice, and who ultimately decides how to balance conservation and development? How do we build governance institutions that facilitate both environmental sustainability and social equity? This seminar on environmental governance will focus on the challenges and opportunities for managing common-pool resources, like fisheries, forests, and water. Because managing environmental resources is often about managing people, we will explore the motivations underlying human behavior towards the environment. We will discuss how institutions encode our cultural values and beliefs, and how we can reshape these institutions to achieve more sustainable outcomes. Coursework includes foundational readings and a pragmatic exploration of case studies. Teaching cases address topics in community-based conservation, international protected areas, market-based approaches, coping with environmental risk, and other themes. Interested undergraduate and graduate students from any discipline are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 255: Microbial Physiology (BIO 180, ESS 255, GEOLSCI 233A)

Introduction to the physiology of microbes including cellular structure, transcription and translation, growth and metabolism, mechanisms for stress resistance and the formation of microbial communities. These topics will be covered in relation to the evolution of early life on Earth, ancient ecosystems, and the interpretation of the rock record. Recommended: introductory biology and chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 256: Soil and Water Chemistry (ESS 256)

(Graduate students register for 256.) Practical and quantitative treatment of soil processes affecting chemical reactivity, transformation, retention, and bioavailability. Principles of primary areas of soil chemistry: inorganic and organic soil components, complex equilibria in soil solutions, and adsorption phenomena at the solid-water interface. Processes and remediation of acid, saline, and wetland soils. Recommended: soil science and introductory chemistry and microbiology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 258: Geomicrobiology (EARTHSYS 158, ESS 158, ESS 258)

How microorganisms shape the geochemistry of the Earth's crust including oceans, lakes, estuaries, subsurface environments, sediments, soils, mineral deposits, and rocks. Topics include mineral formation and dissolution; biogeochemical cycling of elements (carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and metals); geochemical and mineralogical controls on microbial activity, diversity, and evolution; life in extreme environments; and the application of new techniques to geomicrobial systems. Recommended: introductory chemistry and microbiology such as CEE 274A.
Last offered: Winter 2019

EARTHSYS 260: Internship

Supervised field, lab, or public/private sector project. May consist of directed research under the supervision of a Stanford faculty member, participation in one of several off campus Stanford programs, or an approved non-Stanford program or opportunity relevant to the student's Earth Systems studies. Required of and restricted to declared Earth Systems majors. For course requirements, please visit: https://pangea.stanford.edu/esys/earth-systems-internship
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 262: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 162)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
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