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101 - 110 of 167 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 193: Natural Perspectives: Geology, Environment, and Art (EARTH 193)

Multi-day field trip that combines exploration of regional geology, ecology, and environmental history with guided drawing exercises in the Eastern Sierra Nevada of California. We¿ll visit several sites of geologic and environmental interest, discuss their formation and significance, and use drawing as tool for close observation. Students will gain an understanding of the natural processes shaping California, acquire new skills and techniques for artistic expression, and gain an appreciation for how scientific and aesthetic perspectives complement and enhance one another in the study of nature. No previous scientific or artistic experience is required. Preference for freshmen and sophomores. If you are interested in signing up for the course, complete this pre-registration form: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9RF2rDopROzwOxf
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EARTHSYS 194: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Gender and Place (CSRE 132E, PWR 194EP, URBANST 155EP)

Environmental justice means ensuring equal access to environmental benefits and preventing the disproportionate impacts of environmental harms for all communities regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity or other social positions. This introductory course examines the rhetoric, history and key case studies of environmental justice while encouraging critical and collaborative thinking, reading and researching about diversity in environmental movements within the global community and at Stanford, including the ways race, class and gender have shaped environmental battles still being fought today from Standing Rock to Flint, Michigan. We center diverse voices by bringing leaders, particularly from marginalized communities on the frontlines to our classroom to communicate experiences, insights and best practices. Together we will develop and present original research projects which may serve a particular organizational or community need, such as racialized dispossession, toxic pollution and human health, or indigenous land and water rights, among many others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 196: Implementing Climate Solutions at Scale (EARTHSYS 296)

Climate change is the biggest problem humanity has ever faced, and this course will teach students about the means and complexity of solving it. The instructors will guide the students in the application of key data and analysis tools for their final project, which will involve developing integrated plans for eliminating greenhouse gas emissions (100% reductions) by 2050 for a country, state, province, sector, or industry.
Last offered: Spring 2018

EARTHSYS 197: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 198: Seminar on Philosophy, Politics, and the Environment (EARTHSYS 298)

Much public discourse that touches upon the relationship of human society to the natural environment acknowledges the fundamental connection between people and the environment, but avoids or simplifies discussion of broader philosophical and political views of what this relationship is, has been, and ought to be. Expansive conceptual categories of the study of politics, economics, and society, such as capitalism, socialism, democracy, human welfare, and distribution, are often left out entirely, or used quickly and not defined clearly. In thinking big about human society and the natural world, what is ideal, and what is possible? This once-weekly seminar aims to help students develop the breadth and depth of their thinking about the relationship of human society to nature at the level of political, social, and economic philosophy. It will provide an organized setting for the understanding and critical discussion of these abstract but sometimes world-shaping ideas. Particular attention more »
Much public discourse that touches upon the relationship of human society to the natural environment acknowledges the fundamental connection between people and the environment, but avoids or simplifies discussion of broader philosophical and political views of what this relationship is, has been, and ought to be. Expansive conceptual categories of the study of politics, economics, and society, such as capitalism, socialism, democracy, human welfare, and distribution, are often left out entirely, or used quickly and not defined clearly. In thinking big about human society and the natural world, what is ideal, and what is possible? This once-weekly seminar aims to help students develop the breadth and depth of their thinking about the relationship of human society to nature at the level of political, social, and economic philosophy. It will provide an organized setting for the understanding and critical discussion of these abstract but sometimes world-shaping ideas. Particular attention will be paid to the wide range of such views put forth in recent history, the various assumptions built into each view, and to the differing levels of influence and political effectiveness achieved by each. Discussions will be based on a weekly reading from a philosophically oriented work about humanity and the environment, such as a book chapter or a piece of long-form journalism. Grading/credit based on weekly participation and a short reflective paper.
Last offered: Winter 2019

EARTHSYS 199: Honors Program in Earth Systems

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Arrigo, K. (PI) ; Asner, G. (PI) ; Block, B. (PI) ; Boggs, C. (PI) ; Boucher, A. (PI) ; Caldwell, M. (PI) ; Casciotti, K. (PI) ; Chamberlain, P. (PI) ; Daily, G. (PI) ; Davis, J. (PI) ; Denny, M. (PI) ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI) ; Dirzo, R. (PI) ; Dunbar, R. (PI) ; Dunn, D. (PI) ; Durham, W. (PI) ; Egger, A. (PI) ; Ernst, W. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fendorf, S. (PI) ; Field, C. (PI) ; Francis, C. (PI) ; Frank, Z. (PI) ; Freyberg, D. (PI) ; Fukami, T. (PI) ; Gerritsen, M. (PI) ; Gilly, W. (PI) ; Gordon, D. (PI) ; Gorelick, S. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Hadly, E. (PI) ; Hayden, T. (PI) ; Hecker, S. (PI) ; Hilley, G. (PI) ; Ingle, J. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, J. (PI) ; Knight, R. (PI) ; Koseff, J. (PI) ; Kovscek, A. (PI) ; Lambin, E. (PI) ; Litvak, L. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Long, S. (PI) ; Masters, G. (PI) ; Matson, P. (PI) ; Micheli, F. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mooney, H. (PI) ; Mordecai, E. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Orr, F. (PI) ; Palumbi, S. (PI) ; Payne, J. (PI) ; Peay, K. (PI) ; Pringle, J. (PI) ; Root, T. (PI) ; Schneider, S. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Seto, K. (PI) ; Somero, G. (PI) ; Sperling, E. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Switzer, P. (PI) ; Tabazadeh, A. (PI) ; Thomas, L. (PI) ; Thompson, B. (PI) ; Victor, D. (PI) ; Vitousek, P. (PI) ; Walbot, V. (PI) ; Watanabe, J. (PI) ; Welander, P. (PI) ; Weyant, J. (PI) ; Wiederkehr, S. (PI) ; Woodward, J. (PI) ; Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 200: Environmental Communication in Action: The SAGE Project

This course is focused on writing about sustainability for a public audience through an ongoing project, SAGE (Sound Advice for a Green Earth), that is published by Stanford Magazine. Students contribute to SAGE, an eco advice column, by choosing, researching, and answering questions about sustainable living submitted by Stanford alumni and the general public. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement).
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

EARTHSYS 201: Editing for Publication

Most student writing experiences end with a "final" written draft, but that leaves out crucial steps in the publication process. In this course, advanced students take responsibility for final editing and publication of the environmental advice column SAGE, starting with answers researched and written by students in EARTHSYS 200. Topics include developmental editing and project management for the SAGE project, structural editing for overall organization and impact of individual pieces, line editing for clarity and style, and fact checking and copy editing for accuracy and consistency.
Last offered: Winter 2017

EARTHSYS 204: The Water Course (EARTHSYS 104, GEOPHYS 104, GEOPHYS 204)

The Central Valley of California provides a third of the produce grown in the U.S., but recent droughts and increasing demand have raised concerns about both food and water security. The pathway that water takes from rainfall to the irrigation of fields or household taps (¿the water course¿) determines the quantity and quality of the available water. Working with various data sources (measurements made on the ground, in wells, and from satellites) allows us to model the water budget in the valley and explore the recent impacts on freshwater supplies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

EARTHSYS 205: Food and Community: Food Security, Resilience and Equity (EARTHSYS 105)

What can communities do to bolster food security, resiliency, and equity in the face of climate change? This course aims to respond to this question, in three parts. In Part 1, we will explore the most current scientific findings on trends in anthropogenic climate forcing and the anticipated impacts on global and regional food systems. Specifically, Part I will review the anticipated impact of climate change on severe weather events, crop losses, and food price volatility and the influence of these impacts on global and regional food insecurity and hunger. In Part II, we will consider what communities can do to promote food security and equity in the face of these changes, by reviewing the emerging literature on food system resiliency. Finally, we will facilitate a conference in which multi-disciplinary teams from around the country will gather to initiate regional planning projects designed to enhance food system resilience and equity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Limited enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Repeatable for credit
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