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71 - 80 of 154 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 149: Wild Writing (EARTHSYS 249)

What is wilderness and why does it matter? In this course we will interrogate answers to this question articulated by influential and diverse American environmental thinkers of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, who through their writing transformed public perceptions of wilderness and inspired such actions as the founding of the National Park System, the passage of the Wilderness Act and the Clean Air and Water Acts, the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the birth of the environmental and climate justice movements. Students will also develop their own responses to the question of what is wilderness and why it matters through a series of writing exercises that integrate personal narrative, wilderness experience, and environmental scholarship, culminating in a ~3000 word narrative nonfiction essay. This course will provide students with knowledge, tools, experience, and skills that will empower them to become more persuasive environmental storytellers and advocates.nnIf you are interested in signing up for the course, complete this pre-registration form https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9XqZeZs036WIvop
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

EARTHSYS 151: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 251, ESS 151, ESS 251)

Required for Earth Systems students in the oceans track. Interdisciplinary look at how oceanic environments control the form and function of marine life. Topics include distributions of planktonic production and abundance, nutrient cycling, the role of ocean biology in the climate system, expected effects of climate changes on ocean biology. Local weekend field trips. Designed to be taken concurrently with Marine Chemistry (ESS/ EARTHSYS 152/252). Prerequisites: BIO 43 and ESS 8 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 152: Marine Chemistry (EARTHSYS 252, ESS 152, ESS 252)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate problems in marine chemistry and related disciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine the chemical composition of seawater. Air-sea gas exchange, carbonate chemistry, and chemical equilibria, nutrient and trace element cycling, particle reactivity, sediment chemistry, and diagenesis. Examination of chemical tracers of mixing and circulation and feedbacks of ocean processes on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Designed to be taken concurrently with Biological Oceanography (ESS/ EARTHSYS 151/251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 154: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (PWR 91EP)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 155: Science of Soils (ESS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 157: Intermediate Writing: Stanford Science Podcast (PWR 91JS)

In this course, students will explore how podcasts can be used as a tool for effective science communication. Through a series of workshops and guest speakers, students in this course will learn the necessary journalistic and technical skills to produce high quality podcast episodes, from interviewing and storytelling to audio editing and digital publishing. Podcast episodes will highlight the cutting edge research being done at Stanford, and students will choose specific stories based on their own interests, from earth sciences to public health to big data. Final podcast episodes will be published on iTunes.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Stonaker, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 158: Geomicrobiology (EARTHSYS 258, ESS 158, ESS 258)

How microorganisms shape the geochemistry of the Earth's crust including oceans, lakes, estuaries, subsurface environments, sediments, soils, mineral deposits, and rocks. Topics include mineral formation and dissolution; biogeochemical cycling of elements (carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and metals); geochemical and mineralogical controls on microbial activity, diversity, and evolution; life in extreme environments; and the application of new techniques to geomicrobial systems. Recommended: introductory chemistry and microbiology such as CEE 274A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Francis, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (ECON 159, ECON 209, PUBLPOL 159)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction and adaptation strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 20 times (up to 100 units total)
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 162: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 262)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
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