2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

41 - 50 of 154 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (BIO 116)

Terrestrial and marine ecology and conservation biology of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Taught in the field in Hawaii as part of quarter-long sequence of courses including Earth Sciences and Anthropology. Topics include ecological succession, plant-soil interactions, conservation biology, biological invasions and ecosystem consequences, and coral reef ecology. Restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

EARTHSYS 117: Earth Sciences of the Hawaiian Islands (EARTH 117, ESS 117)

Progression from volcanic processes through rock weathering and soil-ecosystem development to landscape evolution. The course starts with an investigation of volcanic processes, including the volcano structure, origin of magmas, physical-chemical factors of eruptions. Factors controlling rock weathering and soil development, including depth and nutrient levels impacting plant ecosystems, are explored next. Geomorphic processes of landscape evolution including erosion rates, tectonic/volcanic activity, and hillslope stability conclude the course. Methods for monitoring and predicting eruptions, defining spatial changes in landform, landform stability, soil production rates, and measuring biogeochemical processes are covered throughout the course. This course is restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 119: Will Work for Food (EARTHSYS 219)

This is a speaker series class featuring highly successful innovators in the food system. Featured speakers will talk in an intimate, conversational manner about their current work, as well as about their successes, failures, and learnings along the way. Additional information can be found here: http://feedcollaborative.org/speaker-series/
Last offered: Spring 2016

EARTHSYS 119B: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. Please visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

EARTHSYS 119C: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. Please visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Rothe, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 121: Building a Sustainable Society: New Approaches for Integrating Human and Environmental Priorities

"Building a Sustainable Society: New approaches for integrating human and environmental priorities" draws on economics, natural resources management, sociology and leadership science to examine theoretical frameworks and diverse case studies that illustrate challenges as well as effective strategies in building a sustainable society where human beings and the natural environment thrive. Themes include collaborative consumption, the sharing economy, worker-owned cooperatives, community-corporate partnerships, cradle to cradle design, social entrepreneurship, impact investing, "beyond GDP", and transformative leadership. Critical perspectives, lectures and student-led discussions guide analysis of innovations within public, private and civic sectors globally. Students explore their personal values and motivations and develop their potential to become transformative leaders.
Last offered: Spring 2016

EARTHSYS 122: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (BIO 119, GEOLSCI 123, GEOLSCI 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 123: Asian Americans and Environmental Justice (ASNAMST 123)

One central tenet of the environmental justice movement is centering the leadership of frontline communities. Unfortunately, the struggles of Asian Americans on the frontlines of corporate environmental pollution and extraction are less visible and less well-known. In this course, we will explore the Asian American voices that have contributed to the development of the environmental justice movement and the leadership that is shaping the future of this movement.nThis course is designed to provide students with education about the history of the environmental justice movement, the future being envisioned, and the strategies that are needed to get to the vision. It will draw on lectures, readings, guest presentations, case studies, and the instructor's more than 15 years of experience with organizing and social justice campaigns. Students will learn about the principles guiding the environmental justice movement; the vision and framework of how we achieve a just transition to a regenerative economy; the process of organizing and campaign work to advance a community agenda; and skills in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information.
Last offered: Spring 2017

EARTHSYS 124: Measurements in Earth Systems (ESS 212)

A classroom, laboratory, and field class designed to provide students familiarity with techniques and instrumentation used to track biological, chemical, and physical processes operating in earth systems, encompassing upland, aquatic, estuarine, and marine environments. Topics include gas and water flux measurement, nutrient and isotopic analysis, soil and water chemistry determination. Students will develop and test hypotheses, provide scientific evidence and analysis, culminating in a final presentation.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints