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21 - 30 of 45 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 155: Science of Soils (ESS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (ECON 159, ECON 209, PUBLPOL 159)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction and adaptation strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 180: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (ESS 280)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: September 12 for Autumn and March 10 for Spring. nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0ANZWrjlz0SbhxX
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 182A: Ecological Farm Systems

A project-based course emphasizing 'ways of doing' in sustainable agricultural systems based at the Stanford Educational Farm. Students will work individually and in small groups on projects at the Stanford Educational Farm. This course will include orchard establishment and educational garden design in addition to other topics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 186: Farm and Garden Environmental Education Practicum (EARTHSYS 286)

Farms and gardens provide excellent settings for place-based environmental education that emphasize human ecological relationships and experiential learning. The O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm is the setting to explore the principles and practices of farm and garden-based education in conjunction with the farm's new field trip program for local youth. The course includes readings and reflections on environmental education and emphasis on learning by doing, engaging students in the practice of team teaching. Application required. Deadline: March 14.nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9SPufdULCh93rbT
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 187A: The Future of Food & Farming Technology

"How are we going to feed X billion people by the year ____?" A historical refrain from corporate agribusiness, academia, national policy makers and, increasingly today, investors and technologists in innovation hotspots like Silicon Valley. But with only 60 global harvests remaining due to soil degradation, the compounding feedback loop between agriculture and climate change, and nearly a billion of our current population starving or undernourished and another billion of them overweight or obese, it begs the question of whether this is the right problem for which our food system should be solving. Some even argue, including the designers of this course, that this question is responsible for the various existential crises we face today.nnThis course will examine the history of agricultural innovation and technology to look for insights as to why our food system has gone so far off the rails. We will utilize the Stanford Educational Farm as a scaled-down model of our agricultural system more »
"How are we going to feed X billion people by the year ____?" A historical refrain from corporate agribusiness, academia, national policy makers and, increasingly today, investors and technologists in innovation hotspots like Silicon Valley. But with only 60 global harvests remaining due to soil degradation, the compounding feedback loop between agriculture and climate change, and nearly a billion of our current population starving or undernourished and another billion of them overweight or obese, it begs the question of whether this is the right problem for which our food system should be solving. Some even argue, including the designers of this course, that this question is responsible for the various existential crises we face today.nnThis course will examine the history of agricultural innovation and technology to look for insights as to why our food system has gone so far off the rails. We will utilize the Stanford Educational Farm as a scaled-down model of our agricultural systems, where each student will step into the role of a modern, large scale farmer under simulated conditions. Through gamified scenarios based on real-world challenges faced by farmers, students will gain a deeper understanding of the problems facing our agriculture. Based on this nuanced understanding, students will propose new and novel uses of existing and/or emerging technologies to solve these problems. These ideas will be circulated in the marketplace of your peer farmers, where ideas will either be adopted, modified and built upon, or abandoned. This process will tap into, challenge, and hone your creative problem solving abilities. In the end, we will see who has what it takes to fundamentally shift the course of our food system,nnThis class is for students who are (a) aspiring ag-tech entrepreneurs (b) generally interested in emerging technologies or (c) seeking a deeper understanding of how large scale agriculture works.nnThe application for this course can be found on the d.school¿s website: https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/nnCourse meets : Saturday May 4th, 10 am to 3pm, Saturday May 11th, 10am to 3pm, Saturday May 25th, 10am to 3pm
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 197: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Spr, offered occasionally | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 199: Honors Program in Earth Systems

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Arrigo, K. (PI) ; Asner, G. (PI) ; Block, B. (PI) ; Boggs, C. (PI) ; Boucher, A. (PI) ; Caldwell, M. (PI) ; Casciotti, K. (PI) ; Chamberlain, P. (PI) ; Daily, G. (PI) ; Davis, J. (PI) ; Denny, M. (PI) ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI) ; Dirzo, R. (PI) ; Dunbar, R. (PI) ; Dunn, D. (PI) ; Durham, W. (PI) ; Egger, A. (PI) ; Ernst, W. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fendorf, S. (PI) ; Field, C. (PI) ; Francis, C. (PI) ; Frank, Z. (PI) ; Freyberg, D. (PI) ; Fukami, T. (PI) ; Gerritsen, M. (PI) ; Gilly, W. (PI) ; Gordon, D. (PI) ; Gorelick, S. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Hadly, E. (PI) ; Hayden, T. (PI) ; Hecker, S. (PI) ; Hilley, G. (PI) ; Ingle, J. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, J. (PI) ; Knight, R. (PI) ; Koseff, J. (PI) ; Kovscek, A. (PI) ; Lambin, E. (PI) ; Litvak, L. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Long, S. (PI) ; Masters, G. (PI) ; Matson, P. (PI) ; Micheli, F. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mooney, H. (PI) ; Mordecai, E. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Orr, F. (PI) ; Palumbi, S. (PI) ; Payne, J. (PI) ; Peay, K. (PI) ; Pringle, J. (PI) ; Root, T. (PI) ; Schneider, S. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Seto, K. (PI) ; Somero, G. (PI) ; Sperling, E. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Switzer, P. (PI) ; Tabazadeh, A. (PI) ; Thomas, L. (PI) ; Thompson, B. (PI) ; Victor, D. (PI) ; Vitousek, P. (PI) ; Walbot, V. (PI) ; Watanabe, J. (PI) ; Welander, P. (PI) ; Weyant, J. (PI) ; Wiederkehr, S. (PI) ; Woodward, J. (PI) ; Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 210P: Earth Systems Capstone Project

Students work independently or in groups to complete their Senior Capstone Projects. They will participate in regular advising meetings with the instructor(s), and will give a final presentation on their projects at the end of the quarter in a special Earth Systems symposium. Prerequisite: EARTHSYS 210A, B, or C.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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