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1 - 3 of 3 results for: CSRE102

CSRE 102: Advanced Methods in Comparative studies in race and ethnicity

This course examines the key theoretical paradigms issues themes and debates as well as the methodological approach is in the field of critical race and comparative ethnic studies. The course also assesses the relative strengths and weaknesses of key methodological paradigms. Perspectives and methods include ethnographic methods, oral history, archival research, literary and cultural analysis, artistic projects as well as decolonizing, queer theory, Gender studies, and indigenous methodologies.nnnThis course uses individual project studies to examine how comparative and relational problems are posed as research projects, how we construct research questions and interrogate those questions, and which methodological approaches are best suited to frame projects, And engage in meaningful research That actively engages ethics, considerations of impact on community and the most powerful format of expression. Traditional academic papers, web based communication such as ESRI as well as multi media artistic musical and performative projects are explored
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

CSRE 102A: Art and Social Criticism (AFRICAAM 102B, AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, FEMGEN 102)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition's agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP's emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon's paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades more »
Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition's agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP's emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon's paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Adrian Piper, Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

CSRE 102C: History of World Cinema III: Queer Cinema around the World (ARTHIST 164, ARTHIST 364, CSRE 302C, FEMGEN 100C, FILMEDIA 100C, FILMEDIA 300C, GLOBAL 193, GLOBAL 390, TAPS 100C, TAPS 300C)

Provides an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. We study key film movements and national cinemas towards developing a formal, historical, theoretical appreciation of a variety of commercial and art film traditions. Specific topics may vary by term/year/instructor. This term's topic, Queer Cinema around the World, studies the relationship of gender, sexuality, and cinematic representation trans-regionally and transnationally. Moving beyond the Euro-American focus of gender and sexuality studies and queer cinema courses, this course will foster an examination of queerness, sexual minorities, same-sex desire, LGBTQI+ rights, censorship, precarity, and hopefulness in relation to race, nationalism, religion, and region. Through film and video from Kenya, Hong Kong, India, The Dominican Republic, South Korea, Spain, Palestine, Argentina, the US (Black, indigenous cinemas, for instance), South Africa, Colombia etc., this course will engage with a range of queer cinematic forms and queer spectatorial practices in different parts of the world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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