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11 - 20 of 37 results for: CSRE

CSRE 100B: Grassroots Community Organizing Practicum

Continuation of projects and community engagement from CSRE 100. Prerequisite: completion of CSRE 100.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Murray, D. (PI)

CSRE 102A: Art and Social Criticism (AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B)

Contemporary visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America and their key works have become anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic inequality, and immigrant rights. We will consider political art by artists such as ACT-UP, Judy Chicago, Fred Wilson, Guerilla Girls, Ai Weiwei and many others that raises social awareness, inspires social change and galvanizes activism. What makes their art enduring social criticism? How have they contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hertz, B. (PI)

CSRE 103: Intergroup Communication (PSYCH 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication.nnThe objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 109B: Indian Country Economic Development (NATIVEAM 109B)

The history of competing tribal and Western economic models, and the legal, political, social, and cultural implications for tribal economic development. Case studies include mineral resource extraction, gaming, and cultural tourism. 21st-century strategies for sustainable economic development and protection of political and cultural sovereignty.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

CSRE 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (NATIVEAM 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 127X: The Ethics of Anonymity (COMM 127X, ETHICSOC 2)

When is it ethical to conceal your identity or to permit another to remain anonymous? What is the value to remaining unknown, and what might be the cost? Does anonymity free you to think, act, or be in ways you wouldn't otherwise? What else might it allow or constrain? How might your answers differ depending on the circumstances or context? In this one-unit lunchtime seminar, guest speakers will discuss topics that might include: anonymous sources in journalism; anonymity online; the history of anonymous authorship and attribution; whistleblowers and confidential informants; anonymous egg or sperm donors and birth parents; anonymity vs. confidentiality for research participants; anonymity and art; technology and anonymity.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Elam, H. (PI)

CSRE 129B: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)

CSRE 131C: Trauma, healing, and empowerment in Asian America (ASNAMST 131)

This course will look at the ways in which Asian Americans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 140C: Stand Up Comedy and the "Great American Joke" Since 1945 (AMSTUD 140)

Development of American Stand Up Comedy in the context of social and cultural eruptions after 1945, including the Borscht Belt, the Chitlin¿ Circuit, the Cold War, censorship battles, Civil Rights and other social movements of the 60s and beyond. The artistry of stories, monologues, jokes, impersonations, persona, social satire, scatology, obscenity, riffs, rants, shtick, and more by such artists as Lenny Bruce, Dick Gregory, Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Margaret Cho, Sarah Silverman, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, as well as precursors such as Mark Twain, minstrelsy and vaudeville and related films, TV shows, poems and other manifestations of similar sensibilities and techniques.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 146A: Approaching Research and the Community (URBANST 123)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program) or CRSE (Community Research Summer Internship). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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