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41 - 50 of 50 results for: CSRE

CSRE 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 200Y: CSRE Senior Honors Research

Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Students can enroll in the course for 1 unit (lectures only), 2 units (lectures+discussion), or 3 units (lectures+discussion+project). For 1 unit, students should sign up for Section 1 and Credit/No Credit grading, and for 2-3 units students should sign up for Section 2 and either the C/NC or Grade option. When the course is taken for 3 units and a grade, it meets the undergraduate WAYS-ED requirement and counts as a TiS course within the School of Engineering.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 221D: Crafting Challenging Conversations in a Conflicted World (NATIVEAM 221)

In moments of divisive, time-sensitive conflict and disagreement, interdependent community groups that are we-us oriented often struggle to maintain cohesive relationships. In this interactive, project-based course, participants will dive into the art of designing new products, services, or experiences for conflict. Throughout the course, participants can expect to unpack the fundamentals of design thinking and components of strong listening, leadership, and effective cultural competency. Individual one-on-one conversations as well as indigenous forms of group-interviewing, known as Peacemaking and Ho'oponopono, will be also explored. At the end of the course, students can expect to have created a low-resolution prototype based on qualitative research that answers the question: How might we lead with community-centered approaches, rather than with independent, divisive reactions in moments of conflict?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 248X: Language, Literacy, and Culture (EDUC 248)

This field-based Cardinal Course will provide a unique opportunity to combine theory and practice in the study of language, literacy, and culture in educational settings. It is a collaborative partnership between Stanford (through the Haas Center for Public Service) and the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula. Stanford students will work directly with children enrolled in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program at a youth center in Redwood City.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 275B: History of Modern Mexico (AMSTUD 275B, CHILATST 275B, HISTORY 275B, HISTORY 375C)

( History 275B is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 375C is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Surveys the history of governance, resistance, and identity formation in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. Explores Mexico's historical struggles to achieve political stability, economic prosperity, and social justice and examines how regional, class, ethnic, and gender differences have figured prominently in the shaping of Mexican affairs. Topics include Mexico's wars and their legacies, the power of the state, violence and protest, debates over the meaning of "Mexicanness," youth culture, and the politics of indigenismo.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 298G: Race, Gender, & Sexuality in Chinese History (ASNAMST 298, FEMGEN 298C, HISTORY 298C)

This course examines the diverse ways in which identities--particularly race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality have been understood and experienced in Chinese societies, broadly defined, from the imperial period to the present day. Topics include changes in women's lives and status, racial and ethnic categorizations, homosexuality, prostitution, masculinity, and gender-crossing.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Elmore, A. (PI)

CSRE 385: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Pedagogical Possibilities (EDUC 389C)

This seminar explores the intersections of language and race/racism/racialization in the public schooling experiences of students of color. We will briefly trace the historical emergence of the related fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology, explore how each of these scholarly traditions approaches the study of language, and identify key points of overlap and tension between the two fields before considering recent examples of inter-disciplinary scholarship on language and race in urban schools. Issues to be addressed include language variation and change, language and identity, bilingualism and multilingualism, language ideologies, and classroom discourse. We will pay particular attention to the implications of relevant literature for teaching and learning in urban classrooms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Banks, A. (PI)
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