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1 - 10 of 257 results for: CSRE

CSRE 1A: My Journey: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 1T: The Public Life of Science and Technology (STS 1)

The course focuses on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments through the STS interdisciplinary lens by developing and applying skills in three areas: (a) The historical analysis of contemporary global matters (e.g., spread of technologies; climate change response); (b) The bioethical reasoning around health issues (e.g., disease management; privacy rights); and (c) The sociological study of knowledge (e.g., intellectual property, science publishing). A discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 1V: A History of Race

This course will survey the idea of race and its history. We will focus our attention on the construction of the idea of race, and we will trace the ways in which this concept has changed over time. The course will start with a panel discussion on definitions of race in history, and as presented in different academic disciplines today. This discussion will be followed by two lectures tracing histories of race from Antiquity until the twentieth century. The last session will be a roundtable on the continuing role of race in the United States today. Covered topics will include explicit and implicit bias, institutionalized racism, race and criminal justice, equal justice initiatives and protests, racial stratification. The roles of politics, economics, science, religion, and nationalism, as well as the relationships between race, gender, and class will also be discussed. This course meets 5 times: Attendance at a January 17 panel ( https://ccsre.stanford.edu/events/ccsre-faculty-seminar-series-panel-discussion) and class on Feb 12, Feb 26, March 5 & March 12th
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lamotte, M. (PI)

CSRE 3E: Michelle Obama in American Culture (AFRICAAM 3E, AMSTUD 3E, FEMGEN 3E, HISTORY 3E)

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 3P: America: Unequal (PUBLPOL 113, SOC 3)

It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that the rich would be so rich and the poor so poor. It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that opportunities to get ahead would depend so profoundly on one's family circumstances and other starting conditions. How could this have happened in the "land of opportunity?" What are the effects of such profound inequality? And what, if anything, should be done about it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Grusky, D. (PI)

CSRE 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 5I: Hamilton: An American Musical (AFRICAAM 5I, AMSTUD 5I, HISTORY 3G)

"Hamilton" is one the most popular and most celebrated musicals in American history. It has received 11 Tony Awards, including best musical, and 16 Tony nominations, the most nominations in Broadway history. It won the Pulitzer Prize and a Grammy Award. The musical draws on the language and rhythms of hip-hop and R & B, genres that are underrepresented in the musical theater tradition. "Hamilton" has redefined the American musical, particularly in terms of sound, casting, and storytelling. What explains the deep cultural impact and acclaim for this play?n nThis interdisciplinary course examines Alexander Hamilton and his world as well as Hamilton: An American Musical through a series of lectures from faculty in History, Theater and Performance Studies, English, Music, and Writing and Rhetoric.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 10A: Introduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy (AFRICAAM 10A)

This weekly lecture series introduces students to the study of identity, diversity, and aesthetics through the work of leading artists and scholars affiliated with the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA). This year's course highlights the educational impact of arts and culture. How can arts and culture help to advance pedagogies of liberation? Among other things, we will examine hip-hop education and how it illuminates ideas around culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies, indigenous knowledges, embodied knowledges, hip-hop feminisms, and community engaged research. We will look at case studies from East Palo Alto, CA and Cape Town, South Africa.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 10AY: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA creative projects in a Celebration Beyond Borders

Students will have the opportunity to develop written and creative responses to the exploration of the region wide collaboration Pacific Standard Time LA/LA.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 10SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (SOC 11SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United St more »
Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)
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