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41 - 50 of 66 results for: CSRE

CSRE 174: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 147, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 174S: When Half is Whole: Developing Synergistic Identities and Mestiza Consciousness (ASNAMST 174S)

This is an exploration of the ways in which individuals construct whole selves in societies that fragment, label, and bind us in categories and boxes. We examine identities that overcome the destructive dichotomies of ¿us¿ and ¿them, ¿ crossing borders of race, ethnicity, culture, nation, sex, and gender. Our focus is on the development of hybrid and synergistic forms of identity and mestiza consciousness in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

CSRE 177F: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177B, EDUC 177B)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)

CSRE 179A: Crime and Punishment in America (AFRICAAM 179A, SOC 179A, SOC 279A)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the way crime has been defined and punished in the United States. Recent social movements such as the Movement for Black Lives have drawn attention to the problem of mass incarceration and officer-involved shootings of people of color. These movements have underscored the centrality of the criminal justice system in defining citizenship, race, and democracy in America. How did our country get here? This course provides a social scientific perspective on America¿s past and present approach to crime and punishment. Readings and discussions focus on racism in policing, court processing, and incarceration; the social construction of crime and violence; punishment among the privileged; the collateral consequences of punishment in poor communities of color; and normative debates about social justice, racial justice, and reforming the criminal justice system. Students will learn to gather their own knowledge and contribute to normative debates through a field report assignment and an op-ed writing assignment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Clair, M. (PI)

CSRE 179W: Du Bois and Democracy (ETHICSOC 179W, PHIL 179W, PHIL 279W)

In this course, we will work together to develop a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the political philosophy of W. E. B. Du Bois, giving special attention to the development of his democratic theory. We will do so by reading a number of key texts by Du Bois as well as contemporary scholarship from philosophy and cognate fields.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Salkin, W. (PI)

CSRE 180A: Foundations of Social Research (SOC 180A, SOC 280A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

CSRE 180S: The Black Music 1980s: Turntables, Beat Machines and DJ Scholarship (AFRICAAM 180S)

This course focuses on the regional rhythms and aesthetic trends of Black popular music of the Americas in the 1980s, a period of Black cultural production largely ignored by the academy. Students will investigate how technology, economic shifts, AIDS, and the War on Drugs impacted communities who produced, created, and danced to music in the face of hostile political terrain. Students will develop and employ careful listening practices that encompass the study of sampling, digging through crates of vinyl, analyzing album cover art, and closely reading liner notes. The musical forms we will cover range from New Jack Swing to Quiet Storm Music to Synthesizer Soul. Figures we will study include nontraditional scholars and practitioners, artists, activists, music journalists, and cultural critics. Finally, students will map the digital movement of music, people, and ideas through post-human platforms such as computer-based home recording studios, portable sound systems, beat-making equipment, keytars, turntables, and sampling machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Banks, A. (PI)

CSRE 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture (HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B, SLAVIC 183)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 195: U.S. Latinx Art (ARTHIST 194, CHILATST 195)

This course surveys artworks made by Latina/o/x artists who live and work in the United States, including Chicanos, Nuyoricans, and others of Latin American and Caribbean descent. Students will study the diversity that comprises the U.S. Latinx demographic while considering artists' relationships to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. They will also explore national debates, such as immigration and national security, that affect artists and their work. Special attention will be paid to cross-cultural and cross-racial exchanges between artists.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

CSRE 198: Internship for Public Service (CHILATST 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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