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21 - 30 of 67 results for: CSRE

CSRE 109A: Federal Indian Law (NATIVEAM 109A)

Cases, legislation, comparative justice models, and historical and cultural material. The interlocking relationships of tribal, federal, and state governments. Emphasis is on economic development, religious freedom, and environmental justice issues in Indian country.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

CSRE 109B: Native Nation Building (NATIVEAM 109B)

The history of competing tribal and Western economic models, and the legal, political, social, and cultural implications for tribal economic development. Case studies include mineral resource extraction, gaming, and cultural tourism. 21st-century strategies for sustainable economic development and protection of political and cultural sovereignty.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CSRE 116: Decolonizing the Indigenous Classroom (CSRE 302, EDUC 186, EDUC 286, NATIVEAM 116)

Using Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education, this interdisciplinary course will examine interaction and language in cross-cultural educational situations, including language, literacy and interethnic communication as they relate to Indigenous American classrooms. Special attention will be paid to implications of social, cultural and linguistic diversity for educational practice, along with various strategies for bridging intercultural differences between schools and Native communities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

CSRE 117: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 217, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, and discussions. Class attendance is required. In Winter 2020, this course is offered only for one unit (and thus does not meet the WAY-ED (University-wide) or TiS (School of Engineering) requirements for undergraduates).
Terms: Win | Units: 1

CSRE 118S: Critical Family History: Narratives of Identity and Difference (AFRICAAM 118X, AMSTUD 118, ASNAMST 118S)

This course examines family history as a site for understanding identity, power, and social difference in American society. Focusing in particular on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality, we approach the family as an archive through which we might write alternative histories to the ones that dominate the national historical consciousness. To do this, we examine memoirs, oral histories, and first-person documentaries as historical texts that can be used to foreground marginalized historical voices. Students will then be asked to apply course readings and theories to their own family histories as a means of better understanding issues of identity and difference.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

CSRE 122B: Reality Television and All Things Basic (FEMGEN 122)

In ¿Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema¿ (1975), feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey argues that ¿the cinema poses questions of the ways the unconscious (formed by the dominant order) structures ways of seeing and pleasure in looking,¿ (804-805), conceptualizing what has become ubiquitously known as ¿the male gaze.¿ Mulvey's theory of the male gaze in film centers on two processes, the pleasures produced through objectification and those produced through identification. Feminists of color who study the politics of popular media have critiqued as well as expanded on Mulvey's notion of the male gaze, including bell hook's articulation of an oppositional gaze¿a critical gaze¿a possible site of resistance for colonized black people.nnWithin the last two decades, reality television has become a staple of popular culture in the U.S., a key component of the representational politics of audiovisual media. Thinking the processes of objectification and identification more expansively and privil more »
In ¿Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema¿ (1975), feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey argues that ¿the cinema poses questions of the ways the unconscious (formed by the dominant order) structures ways of seeing and pleasure in looking,¿ (804-805), conceptualizing what has become ubiquitously known as ¿the male gaze.¿ Mulvey's theory of the male gaze in film centers on two processes, the pleasures produced through objectification and those produced through identification. Feminists of color who study the politics of popular media have critiqued as well as expanded on Mulvey's notion of the male gaze, including bell hook's articulation of an oppositional gaze¿a critical gaze¿a possible site of resistance for colonized black people.nnWithin the last two decades, reality television has become a staple of popular culture in the U.S., a key component of the representational politics of audiovisual media. Thinking the processes of objectification and identification more expansively and privileging bell hook¿s formulation of critical spectatorship, what types of pleasures are produced through the addition of the category ¿reality?¿ How does this relate to our understandings of racialized gender in the U.S.? Is reality television ¿this generation¿s¿ soap opera, a feminized genre of (melo)drama? And does this form of reality simply reproduce the heteronormative order, or can this form of media ever subvert normative prescriptions regarding gender, age, race, class, and sex(uality)?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Chhun, L. (PI)

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

CSRE 126C: Ethics and Leadership in Public Service (EDUC 126A, ETHICSOC 79, URBANST 126A)

This course explores ethical questions that arise in public service work, as well as leadership theory and skills relevant to public service work. Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, assignments, and guest lectures, students will develop a foundation and vision for a future of ethical and effective service leadership. This course serves as a gateway for interested students to participate in the Haas Center's Public Service Leadership Program.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Lobo, K. (PI)

CSRE 135P: The Psychology of Diverse Community (PSYCH 135)

This course is an exploration. Its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and mange such communities e.g. schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Steele, C. (PI)

CSRE 144: Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class (ASNAMST 144, FEMGEN 144X)

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED
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