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1 - 10 of 29 results for: CSRE

CSRE 1A: Meet the Profs: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others. The course may be taken for either one or two units. Open to freshmen and sophomores only.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 24D: Introduction to Dance in the African Diaspora (AFRICAAM 24, DANCE 24, TAPS 152D)

This course introduces students to dance as an important cultural force in the African Diaspora. From capoeira in Brazil to dance hall in Jamaica to hip hop in the United States and Ghana, we will analyze dance as a form of resistance to slavery, colonialism, and oppression; as an integral component of community formation; and as a practice that shapes racial, gendered, and national identity. We will explore these topics through readings, film viewings, and movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Students will have the option to do a creative performance as part of their final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Das, J. (PI)

CSRE 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. The everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America in comparative context of histories of European, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Primary sources including personal journals, memoirs, music, literature, and film, and historical texts. Topics include slavery and emancipation, labor and leisure, consumer culture, social activism, changing gender roles, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, FEMGEN 63N, HISTORY 63N)

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

CSRE 66S: The Americans are Coming!: The Cold War at Home and Abroad (HISTORY 66S)

This course explores the relationship between U.S. foreign and domestic policy from 1945 to 1975. How did fighting the "Communist menace" shape notions of race, gender, and national identity within the United States? In what ways did nation-building abroad trigger clashes over the meaning of democracy at home? Using textual sources, photographs, films, and cartoons, students will examine notions of what it meant to be "American," both inside and outside the nation's borders, in a Cold War climate. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement.
Terms: Win, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katzen, R. (PI)

CSRE 102: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ANTHRO 102C, ARCHLGY 101, ARCHLGY 202, NATIVEAM 102)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Using an innovative combination of online lectures by Stanford faculty and students, and recorded interviews with Indigenous leaders, artists, performers, scholars and museum professionals, the seminar will explore and problematize: historic and contemporary understandings of "Indigenous cultural heritage" and the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other forces on Indigenous identity and cultural heritage; current and potential domestic and international legal and non-legal frameworks for Indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation; past and present museum approaches to Indigenous peoples and their cultural material; and optimal methods of resolving repatriation disputes. While the seminar will cover primarily the situation of Indigenous peoples in North America, comparisons will be drawn with other regions of the globe. The on-campus component of the seminar will involve directed discussions of the online content, the online forum, assigned readings and short writing assignments. Students can choose between a final exam, paper or video project. Lunch is provided.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jessiman, S. (PI)

CSRE 109A: Federal Indian Law (NATIVEAM 109A)

Cases, legislation, comparative justice models, and historical and cultural material. The interlocking relationships of tribal, federal, and state governments. Emphasis is on economic development, religious freedom, and environmental justice issues in Indian country.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

CSRE 112X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, EDUC 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212X or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

CSRE 131C: Trauma, healing, and empowerment in Asian America (ASNAMST 131)

This course will look at the ways in which Asian Americans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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