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1 - 10 of 16 results for: CSI::projectcourse ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and int more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CEE 277S: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, ENGR 177B, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

CS 402: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (EDUC 236)

This course is a practicum in the design of technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. It focuses on the theories, concepts, and practices necessary to design effective, low-cost educational technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. We will explore theories and design frameworks from constructivist and constructionist learning perspectives, as well as the lenses of critical pedagogy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and interaction design for children. The course will concretize theories, concepts, and practices in weekly presentations (including examples) from industry experts with significant backgrounds and proven expertise in designing successful, evidence-based, educational technology products. The Practicum provides the design foundation for EDUC 211 / CS 402 L, a hands-on lab focused on introductory prototyping and the fabrication of incipient interactive, educational technologies. (No prior prototyping experience required.) Interested students must also register for either EDUC 211 or CS 402L, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Grant, W. (PI)

CS 402L: Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab (EDUC 211)

This lab course is a hands-on introduction to the prototyping and fabrication of tangible, interactive technologies, with a special focus on learning and education. (No prior prototyping experience required.) It focuses on the design and prototyping of low-cost technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. You will be introduced to, and learn how to use state-of-the-art fabrication machines (3D printers, laser cutters, Go Go Boards, Sensors, etc.) to design educational toolkits, educational toys, science kits, and tangible user interfaces. The lab builds on the the theoretical and evidence-based foundations explored in the EDUC 236 / CS 402 Practicum. Interested students must also register for either EDUC 236 or CS 402, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3
Instructors: Grant, W. (PI)

EDUC 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (ENGR 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Mitchell, J. (PI)

ENGR 281: d.media - Designing Media that Matters

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today's technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu, Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

ENGR 350: Data Impact Lab

In this lab, multi-disciplinary teams of students tackle high-impact, unsolved problems for social sector partners. Teams receive mentorship and coaching from Stanford faculty, domain experts, and data science experts from industry. Sample projects include innovations for: poverty alleviation in the developing world, local government services, education, and healthcare. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6

ENVRES 290: Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources

Required for and limited to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. Propose, conduct and publicly present final individual or team projects demonstrating the integration of professional (M.B.A., J.D., or M.D.) and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees. Presentation and submission of final product required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3

ENVRES 380: Innovating Large Scale Sustainable Transformations/Collaborating for the Future (SUST 230)

The capacity to innovate system-level transformations is a crucial leadership modality in the face of complex systemic challenges. This class gives students the mindsets, theoretical framework, and hands-on experience in shaping innovative interventions that bring about scaled and profound transformations in the face of complex multi-factorial challenges. Students are immersed in the System Acupuncture Methodology, which combines systems thinking, strategy, design thinking, behavioral sciences, resilience theory, diffusion theory, decision theory, and a theoretical framework around scaled multi-stakeholder interventions. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create sustainability and resilience on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. This project-based team-based class challenges students to find solutions for complex real-world challenges. Class meets in the spring quarter on Fridays 9:30am-4:20pm, weeks 1-9. Lunch will be provided. Final presentations on Friday of week 9, 3-7:30pm. Consent of instructor required. To be considered, please apply on the d.school website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4
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