2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 7 of 7 results for: CSI::poverty ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/M.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 265I: Poverty, Infrastructure and Climate (ESS 264)

Lack of access to physical infrastructure such as roads, water supply and electricity is a key element of how 'poverty' is often defined. At the same time, the causal pathways that link infrastructure and economic development are not well understood, and are likely being re-shaped by a changing climate. Students in this course will contribute to a new initiative on poverty, infrastructure and climate change by (1) reviewing and synthesizing literature from relevant scholarly communities, (2) co-creating a conceptual causal model of the ways in which infrastructure (particularly roads and water assets) contributes to poverty alleviation, and (3) contributing to the design of applied research effort on these topics in sub-Saharan Africa. Students who opt for the 3-unit enrollment will have an additional supervised project that could take the form of a review paper, research proposal, or analysis of secondary data. There are no formal pre-requisites for the class; students from all schools and departments are welcome. Enrollment requires permission of the instructors. Interested students are invited to submit an application at https://tiny.cc/EPIC-Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Davis, J. (PI)

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 214: Development Economics I

This course uses microeconomic theory and empirical analyses to understand barriers to human and economic development in lower income countries, as well as how public policies are formulated and their effectiveness at alleviating poverty. Topics include institutions and governance; human capital accumulation; productivity; inequality; poverty traps. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Dupas, P. (PI)

HISTORY 226E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 326E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

INTLPOL 281: Global Poverty and the Law

(Formerly IPS 281) With more than a billion people living on less than $2 a day, global poverty is one of the biggest challenges currently facing humanity. Even though those who suffer the most are located in the developing world, many of the policies, economic opportunities, and legal actions that offer the biggest potential for global poverty alleviation are made in the United States. This course will provide an introduction to the study of global poverty. What causes poverty? Why have some parts of the developing world done better at alleviating poverty than other parts? Can the world ever be free of poverty, as the World Bank's official motto suggests? And most importantly, what can aspiring lawyers do to improve the condition of the world's impoverished? These are some of the questions this course is designed to address. This course is designed especially for future lawyers and policymakers who seek a deeper understanding of the developing world. After a brief overview that will more »
(Formerly IPS 281) With more than a billion people living on less than $2 a day, global poverty is one of the biggest challenges currently facing humanity. Even though those who suffer the most are located in the developing world, many of the policies, economic opportunities, and legal actions that offer the biggest potential for global poverty alleviation are made in the United States. This course will provide an introduction to the study of global poverty. What causes poverty? Why have some parts of the developing world done better at alleviating poverty than other parts? Can the world ever be free of poverty, as the World Bank's official motto suggests? And most importantly, what can aspiring lawyers do to improve the condition of the world's impoverished? These are some of the questions this course is designed to address. This course is designed especially for future lawyers and policymakers who seek a deeper understanding of the developing world. After a brief overview that will familiarize students with the major concepts and empirical debates in poverty and development studies, we will examine a variety of 'causes' of poverty, from poor governance to lack of economic opportunity to the role of society. Since this course is just as much about what can be done, we shall also consider applied approaches to poverty alleviation. These types of interventions include political/legal reforms such as anti-corruption initiatives, 'rule of law' interventions, right to information programs, privatization, and community-driven development models; economic solutions such as cash transfers and microfinance; and technological approaches such as new methods for measuring policy impact and the application of new technologies for state identification and distribution programs. In addition to more typical scholarly readings, students will review poverty alleviation policy proposals and contracts made by various stakeholders (academics, NGOs, states, international bodies, etc.). Grading is based on participation, a presentation of research or a proposal, and, in consultation with the professor, a research paper. The research paper may be a group project (Section 01) graded MP/R/F or an individual in-depth research proposal either of which could be the basis for future field research (Section 02) graded H/P/R/F. Students approved for Section 01 or Section 02 may receive R credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section 01 into Section 02 with consent of the instructor. Automatic grading penalty waived for research paper. This course is taught in conjunction with the India Field Study component ( Law 5026). Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 5026 with consent of the instructor (12 students will come to India). See Law 5026 for application instructions. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with LAW 5025.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SOC 350W: Workshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation

Weekly research workshop with a focus on ongoing research by faculty and graduate student participants, new theory and research, and recent publications. Workshop participants will present their own work, and read and critique the research-in-progress of their peers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 60 units total)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints