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41 - 50 of 79 results for: CSI::policy-government ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model

Designing a Policy Framework to Facilitate Information Exchange between INTERPOL and Private Sector. Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national police agencies is critical in combatting cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPO---the world's largest international police organization---has aggressively worked to counter criminal networks across the globe by facilitating international police cooperation through global information sharing via its criminal databases. To conduct cross-border investigations and tackle organized crime, the law enforcement agencies around the globe can instantly access millions of records on fingerprints, DNA, stolen motor vehicles, firearms, and travel documents stored in INTERPOL's databases. Only the designated law enforcement agencies from INTERPOL's member countr more »
Designing a Policy Framework to Facilitate Information Exchange between INTERPOL and Private Sector. Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national police agencies is critical in combatting cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPO---the world's largest international police organization---has aggressively worked to counter criminal networks across the globe by facilitating international police cooperation through global information sharing via its criminal databases. To conduct cross-border investigations and tackle organized crime, the law enforcement agencies around the globe can instantly access millions of records on fingerprints, DNA, stolen motor vehicles, firearms, and travel documents stored in INTERPOL's databases. Only the designated law enforcement agencies from INTERPOL's member countries are authorized to share and add information to these databases. Advances in digital technologies and proliferation of communication platforms have created new challenges for the law enforcement. Criminal actors increasingly use private corporate entities, like Internet Service Providers, other telecommunications entities, and social media platforms, to coordinate criminal activities, such as trafficking in persons, terrorism, or cybercrime. Those private sector actors also are potentially critical repositories of information about criminal activity, including communications about members of criminal networks and financial information. Effective law enforcement operations accordingly often depend on information exchange with private sector. Law enforcement authorities face difficulty in effectively accessing, analyzing, and utilizing information from private sector actors in third countries. INTERPOL strives to innovate to adequately respond to the evolving threat landscape and remain at the forefront of global policing efforts. Therefore, it is committed to reviewing and improving its policies on collecting, handling, and sharing data from private sector sources, particularly sources in the technology industry. Under the supervision of the faculty, students in this practicum will work with INTERPOL to enhance its role in cooperating with private sector actors to better fight cyber-crime, terrorism, and other forms of transnational crime. Students will conduct comparative analysis on how select INTERPOL member countries and other relevant international law enforcement agencies exchange information with private sector while safeguarding privacy and protecting civil liberties. Based on this in-depth comparative research, the team will then propose a policy guidance for INTERPOL on information exchange with private sector. This practicum takes place for two quarters (Fall and Winter). Although students may enroll for either one or both quarters, preference is given to students who agree to enroll for both quarters. Students will work directly with INTERPOL clients (via video-conferencing and email) and may have opportunities to travel to INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon over the Spring Break for meetings with clients to develop our policy guidance and provide policy briefings. Selected students in the practicum may also have the opportunity to pursue internships and/or externships at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. This Practicum is open to students from the Law School (both JDs/LLMs/JSMs/JSDs), the Graduate School of Business, International Policy Studies, the School of Communications, the Computer Science Department, and other graduate students outside of the SLS. Practicum will meet weekly on Wednesdays, from 9:00-10:30 am and hold regular discussion sessions with senior INTERPOL officials via VCT. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Oral Briefings, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Policy lab is offered for three units. Students may enroll in this policy lab for one or two units only in agreement with the instructors. In Spring Quarter, the policy lab is offered for one or two units. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 255) in Autumn and Winter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 2503: Energy Law

(Formerly Law 455) Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require massive capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change, as changes in the supply and costs of renewable and fossil energy resources alike transform the U.S. energy sector. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of more »
(Formerly Law 455) Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require massive capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change, as changes in the supply and costs of renewable and fossil energy resources alike transform the U.S. energy sector. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders all deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods--most recently in a series of transformative proposals to use federal emergency powers to provide financial bailouts to legacy fossil and nuclear power plants. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation (20%), short written assignments (40%), and a one-day take-home final exam (40%). Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

(Formerly Law 255) This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Schacter, J. (PI)

MGTECON 300: Growth and Stabilization in the Global Economy

This course gives students the background they need to understand the broad movements in the global economy. Key topics include long-run economic growth, technological change, wage inequality, international trade, interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, and monetary policy. By the end of the course, students should be able to read and understand the discussions of economic issues in The Economist, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, or the Congressional Budget Office.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MGTECON 327: Business and Public Policy Perspectives on U.S. Inequality

This class will analyze the growth in inequality in the US over the last several decades and how that trend is likely to continue or change in the future. We will ask if and how public policy can affect inequality. We will also focus on business's role -- what are the responsibilities of private sector companies, how does inequality affect them, and how should the growth in inequality affect their strategies? We will look at inequality in income, some of its potential sources, and its effects in other areas. Specifically, we will look at education, housing, the social safety net, migration, and the job market. The class will be very interactive and will be based on readings drawn from academic research, case studies, news, and opinion readings. We will also have guest speakers from industry, government, and non-profits. The class will be co-taught by a GSB labor economist and an advisor to policy makers with decades of business experience.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

MGTECON 331: Health Law: Finance and Insurance

This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the US. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

MS&E 190: Methods and Models for Policy and Strategy Analysis

Guest lectures by departmental practitioners. Emphasis is on links among theory, application, and observation. Environmental, national security, and health policy; marketing, new technology, and new business strategy analyses. Comparisons between domains and methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 243: Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis

Concepts, methods, and applications. Energy/environmental policy issues such as automobile fuel economy regulation, global climate change, research and development policy, and environmental benefit assessment. Group project. Prerequisite: MS&E 241 or ECON 50, 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 256: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices (BIOE 256)

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new health technologies are critical success factors for product commercialization. This course explores the regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, as well as common methods of health technology assessment. Students will learn frameworks to identify factors relevant to the adoption of new health technologies, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases of bringing a product to market through case studies, guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry, and a course project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pietzsch, J. (PI)

MS&E 256A: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new medical technologies as a key component of product commercialization. The regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, and common methods of health technology assessment. Framework to identify factors relevant to adoption of new medical devices, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases. Case studies; guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Pietzsch, J. (PI)
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