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31 - 40 of 65 results for: CSI::policy-government ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 153: Creation of the Constitution

(Same as LAW 230.) The course begins with readings setting forth the intellectual and experiential background of the framing, including common law and natural rights theory, republicanism, economic & political scientific ideas, and colonial and post-Independence experience. We then study large parts of the debates at the Constitutional Convention, primarily using Madison's Notes. Next come the ratification debates, including readings from antifederalist writers, about half of The Federalist, and overviews of the Virginia and New York ratification conventions. We conclude with the addition of the Bill of Rights. Classes consist of a combination of lecture and extensive participation by students. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 123: The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities

First, this course analyzes the EU's greatest challenge, preserving the monetary union, and discusses the political and economic reforms needed to achieve that goal. In this context the course also studies the fiscal and budgetary polices of the EU. Second, the course discusses the EU's role in global politics, its desire to play a more prominent role, and the ways to reach that objective. Third, the course analyzes the EU's institutional challenges in its efforts to enhance its democratic character.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 135A: International Environmental Law and Policy

This course addresses the nature, content, and structure of international environmental law. We will discuss its sources (formal and informal) and general principles, along with the emerging principles (sustainable development, precautionary principle, etc.) We will evaluate the role of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as examine the negotiation, conclusion, and implementation of international environmental agreements. Problem areas to be examined include global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, exports of hazardous substances, transboundary pollution, trade and environment, and development and environment. RECOMMENDED PREREQ: students have completed POLISCI 101 and/or INTNLREL 140A
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)

LAW 2503: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Schacter, J. (PI)

MGTECON 327: U.S. Inequality: What Can Business and Policy Do?

This class will analyze the growth in inequality in the US over the last several decades and how that trend is likely to continue or change in the future. We will ask if and how public policy can affect inequality. We will also focus on business's role -- what are the responsibilities of private sector companies, how does inequality affect them, and how should the growth in inequality affect their strategies? We will look at inequality in income, some of its potential sources, and its effects in other areas. Specifically, we will look at education, housing, the social safety net, migration, and the job market. The class will be very interactive and will be based on readings drawn from academic research, case studies, news, and opinion readings. We will also have guest speakers from industry, government, and non-profits. The class will be co-taught by a GSB labor economist and an advisor to policy makers with decades of business experience.LOGISTICAL NOTE: During the week of May 13, the class will not meet during the regular time slots. Instead, there will be a mandatory, all-day class field trip to explore inequality issues in depth and in person on Wednesday, May 15. If you have an academic-related reason you cannot make the trip, we will assign alternative work. However, the trip is required unless you have a conflicting class or academic obligation.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

MGTECON 331: Health Law: Finance and Insurance

This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the US. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

MS&E 190: Methods and Models for Policy and Strategy Analysis

Guest lectures by departmental practitioners. Emphasis is on links among theory, application, and observation. Environmental, national security, and health policy; marketing, new technology, and new business strategy analyses. Comparisons between domains and methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 243: Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis

Concepts, methods, and applications. Energy/environmental policy issues such as automobile fuel economy regulation, global climate change, research and development policy, and environmental benefit assessment. Group project. Prerequisite: MS&E 241 or ECON 50, 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sweeney, J. (PI)

MS&E 256: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices (BIOE 256)

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new health technologies are critical success factors for product commercialization. This course explores the regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, as well as common methods of health technology assessment. Students will learn frameworks to identify factors relevant to the adoption of new health technologies, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases of bringing a product to market through case studies, guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry, and a course project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pietzsch, J. (PI)
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