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31 - 40 of 63 results for: CSI::policy-government ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HUMBIO 120: Health Care in America: An Introduction to U.S. Health Policy

Health policy and health care delivery from a historical and a current policy perspective. Introduces cost, quality, and access as measures of health system performance. Considers institutional aspects of health care reform and whether health care should be a right of all Americans. This course emphasizes the historical and cultural factors that have affected the evolution of our health care system in areas such as Medicaid, Medicare, and the development of managed care systems. Note: HUMBIO courses in the 120s (specifically HUMBIO 120, HUMBIO 120A, HUMBIO 120B) are designed to have complementary content and offer a variety of perspectives on the Health Care System. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

INTNLREL 123: The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities

First, this course analyzes the EU's greatest challenge, preserving the monetary union, and discusses the political and economic reforms needed to achieve that goal. In this context the course also studies the fiscal and budgetary polices of the EU. Second, the course discusses the EU's role in global politics, its desire to play a more prominent role, and the ways to reach that objective. Third, the course analyzes the EU's institutional challenges in its efforts to enhance its democratic character.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 135A: International Environmental Law and Policy: Oceans and Climate Change

This seminar offers an introduction to International Environmental Law, with a strong emphasis on oceans and climate change, its underlying principles, how it is developed and implemented, and the challenges of enforcing it. We will focus on oceans and climate change, exploring the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention (UNCLOS) and the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC). We will explain why these agreements are described as ¿umbrella conventions¿ and how new conventions like the Paris Agreement fit within them. There will be guest speakers, a negotiation simulation, and a legal design sprint focused on re-imagining International Environmental Law.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Chand, K. (PI)

LAW 2503: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance privat more »
Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 7508: Problem Solving and Decision Making for Public Policy and Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems--in areas such as education, health, energy, and domestic and global poverty--that call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles, covering topics such as designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing behavior; and pay-for-success programs. The large majority of the course will be devoted to students' working in teams to apply these concepts and tools to an actual problem, with teams choosing whatever problem interests them. The course may be of interest to students in Law and Policy Lab practicums who wish to broaden their policy analysis skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

MGTECON 300: Growth and Stabilization in the Global Economy

This course gives students the background they need to understand the broad movements in the global economy. Key topics include long-run economic growth, technological change, wage inequality, international trade, interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, and monetary policy. By the end of the course, students should be able to read and understand the discussions of economic issues in The Economist, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, or the Congressional Budget Office.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

MS&E 243: Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis

Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Sweeney, J. (PI)

MS&E 256: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices (BIOE 256)

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new health technologies are critical success factors for product commercialization. This course explores the regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, as well as common methods of health technology assessment. Students will learn frameworks to identify factors relevant to the adoption of new health technologies, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases of bringing a product to market through case studies, guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry, and a course project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Pietzsch, J. (PI)

MS&E 256A: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new medical technologies as a key component of product commercialization. The regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, and common methods of health technology assessment. Framework to identify factors relevant to adoption of new medical devices, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases. Case studies; guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Pietzsch, J. (PI)

MS&E 292: Health Policy Modeling

Primarily for master's students; also open to undergraduates and doctoral students. The application of mathematical, statistical, economic, and systems models to problems in health policy. Areas include: disease screening, prevention, and treatment; assessment of new technologies; bioterrorism response; and drug control policies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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