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1 - 10 of 63 results for: CSI::policy-government ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAST 300: Contemporary Issues in African Studies

Guest scholars present analyses of major African themes and topics. Brief response papers required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hubbard, L. (PI)

AMSTUD 123X: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

This is a course about American politics, which means this is a course about individuals, identities, and institutions. How do Americans come to think andnreason about politics? What is the role that identities play in affecting the political judgments that individuals make? How do our political institutionsnrespond to the demands of a diverse public that disagrees about issues related to race and justice, income and wealth inequality, climate change, gunncontrol, reproductive rights, the power of the executive, and the role that government ought to play in the lives of the governed? And how do we makensense of this seemingly peculiar contemporary moment in American politics? These are not easy questions, but they are ones for which political sciencenprovides a useful foundation to guide our inquiry. The objective of this course is to introduce students to various concepts and theoretical frameworks thatnhelp us understand the messiness and complexity of American politics. In addition to classroom lectures and discussion sections, students will benrequired to apply concepts and theoretical frameworks to contemporary issues in American politics. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for 5 units.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (CSRE 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as more »
As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CEE 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 227: Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Bennon, M. (PI)

CEE 241A: Infrastructure Project Development (CEE 141A)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities, and communications sectors. Analysis of the condition of the nation's infrastructure and how projects are planned and financed. Focus is on public works in the U.S. The role of public and private sectors through a step-by-step study of the project development process. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare project environmental impact statements.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3

CEE 241B: Infrastructure Project Delivery (CEE 141B)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities ,and communications sectors. Analysis of how projects are designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. Focus is on public works projects in the U.S. Alternative project delivery approaches and organizational strategies. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare finance/design/build/operate/maintain project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 241C: Global Infrastructure Projects Seminar (CEE 141C)

Nine current global infrastructure projects presented by top project executives or company leaders from industry. Water, transportation, energy and communication projects are featured. Course provides comparisons of project development, win and delivery approaches for mega-projects around the world. Alternative project delivery methods, the role of public and private sector, different project management and construction strategies, and lessons learned. The course also includes field trips to local mega-projects. Grade (one unit) is based on attending all 9 lectures and at least 2 field trips.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 323A: Infrastructure Finance and Governance

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

CHEMENG 60Q: Environmental Regulation and Policy

Preference to sophomores. How does government, politics and science affect environmental policy? We examine environmental policy including the precautionary principal, acceptable risks, mathematical models, and cost-effectiveness of regulation. You will learn how data is changing environmental regulation and how different administrations mold environmental policy in real-time. We examine the use of science and engineering, its media presentation and misrepresentation, and the effect of public scientific and technical literacy. You will learn how to participate in the process and effect change.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Libicki, S. (PI)
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