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61 - 70 of 119 results for: CSI::policy-government

IPS 255: Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization'is constantly innovating to respond effectively to the world's evolving threat landscape. As a leader in global policing efforts, INTERPOL launched the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and develop a roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a leader and respected voice in global security matters. This practicum will allow students to assist INTERPOL in modernizing its organizational structure to better fight cyber-crime and terrorism. Students in this practicum will contribute to the Strategic Framework 2017-2020, focusing on comparative governance practices for international organizations. The practicum will analyze decision-making processes within the organization and across other similar organizations (acknowledging their respective mandates) with respect to specific issues identified by INTERPOL. The work product developed during the course of this practicum will serve as part of a framework for INTERPOL to guide and support the development of its governance model. Students in practicum will work directly with INTERPOL clients (via Video-conferencing and email) and may have opportunities to travel to INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon for meetings with clients to develop our policy guidance and provide policy briefings. In addition, selected students in the practicum may have the opportunity to pursue internships and/or externships at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. Open to graduate students from outside the Law School and, in exceptional cases, to advanced undergraduate students, the practicum seeks those who demonstrate strong interest and background in global security and international law, organizational behavior, and strategic management. This practicum takes place for two quarters (Fall and Winter). Although students may enroll for either one or both quarters, we will give preference to students who agree to enroll for both quarters. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE (for LAW students): Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with LAW 805Z.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-3

IPS 264: Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia

Introduction to India, Af-Pak and China. Analyzes historical forces that shaped the region, recent history and current state of key countries: the economic and political rise of India and China; rise of the Taliban and Al Qaeda in Afghanistan; Pakistan's government, military, and mullahs; and China's impact on the region. nExplores U.S. policy in depth: U.S. intervention in- and upcoming withdrawal from Afghanistan, U.S. relations with Pakistan and India, the "pivot to Asia" and its implications for US-China relations and the strategic balance in Asia. nSatisfies the IPS policy writing requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Manuel, A. (PI)

IPS 270: The Geopolitics of Energy

The global energy landscape is undergoing seismic shifts with game-changing economic, political and environmental ramifications. Technological breakthroughs are expanding the realms of production, reshuffling the competition among different sources of energy and altering the relative balance of power between energy exporters and importers. The US shale oil and gas bonanza is replacing worries about foreign oil dependence with an exuberance about the domestic resurgence of energy-intensive sectors. China¿s roaring appetite for energy imports propels its national oil companies to global prominence. Middle Eastern nations that used to reap power from oil wealth are bracing for a struggle for political relevance. Many African energy exporters are adopting promising strategies to break with a history dominated by the ¿resource curse¿.nThis course provides students with the knowledge, skill set and professional network to analyze how the present and past upheavals in oil and gas markets affect energy exporters and importers, their policymaking, and their relative power. Students will gain a truly global perspective thanks to a series of exciting international guest speakers and the opportunity to have an impact by working on a burning issue for a real world client. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL--the world's largest international police organization'is constantly innovating to respond effectively to the world's evolving threat landscape. As a leader in global policing efforts, INTERPOL launched the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and develop a roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a leader and respected voice in global security matters. This practicum will allow students to assist INTERPOL in modernizing its organizational structure to better fight cyber-crime and terrorism. Students in this practicum will contribute to the Strategic Framework 2017-2020, focusing on comparative governance practices for international organizations. The practicum will analyze decision-making processes within the organization and across other similar organizations (acknowledging their respective mandates) with respect to specific issues identified by INTERPOL. The work product developed during the course of this practicum will serve as part of a framework for INTERPOL to guide and support the development of its governance model. During Fall and Winter Quarters, students have engaged in comparative research with a wide range of international organizations (IOs) to explore how such organizations maximize the benefits they offer to, and in turn the political support they receive from, member states and other stakeholders. To support the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative and guide the organization's efforts to reform its governance model, student inquiry has focused on six separate research themes: (1) the modalities of policy level engagement by IOs with stakeholders; (2) regional engagement strategies of IOs; (3) IO strategies for aligning missions and building relationship with other international organizations and key international actors; (4) IO financing and fundraising strategies; (5) the design of IOs external relations units or functions; and (6) strategic communication approaches of various IOs. During the Spring Quarter, students will work under close faculty supervision to complete a final "deliverable" memorandum for our INTERPOL clients. Students in the Spring Quarter practicum will devote substantial efforts to harmonizing the comparative research conducted over the first two quarters of 2017-2018 into a single product to be delivered to INTERPOL. Students will create an overview executive summary that highlights our findings for those who are unable to review the full final product, which we imagine will be a quite lengthy document. In addition, during student briefings of INTERPOL of their preliminary findings held in Lyon in March 2017, INTERPOL raised a number of follow-on questions related to our research. Students in the Spring practicum may also conduct supplemental research into these issues, which potentially could be the subject of further in-depth collaborate policy research activities with INTERPOL. Students will work directly with INTERPOL clients (via Video-conferencing and email) and may have opportunities to travel to INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon for meetings with clients to develop our policy guidance and provide policy briefings. In addition, selected students in the practicum may have the opportunity to pursue internships and/or externships at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. Open to graduate students from outside the Law School and, in exceptional cases, to advanced undergraduate students, the practicum seeks those who demonstrate strong interest and background in global security and international law, organizational behavior, and strategic management. This practicum takes place for three quarters (Fall, Winter and Spring). Although students may enroll for either one or all three quarters, we will give preference to students who agree to enroll for more quarters. Autumn Quarter is offered for 2 or 3 units. Winter Quarter is offered for 3 units. Spring Quarter is offered for 1 or 2 units. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy Studies ( IPS 255) in Autumn and Winter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 2503: Energy Law

(Formerly Law 455) The supply of a reliable, low-cost and clean energy supply for the United States is a key determinant of current and future prosperity. Perhaps as a result, electric utilities are among the most heavily regulated of large firms. This statutory and regulatory framework is composed of a complex patchwork of overlapping state and federal rules that is constantly evolving to meet emerging challenges to the energy system. In this course, students will acquire a basic understanding of the law of rate-based regulation of utilities. We will then examine the history of natural gas pipeline regulation in the United States, concluding with the introduction of market competition into US natural gas markets and the advent of shale gas. Next, we will cover the basics of the electricity system, including consumer demand, grid operations, and power plant technologies and economics. We will then revisit cost of service rate regulation as it has been applied in the electricity context. Next we will examine reform of both rate-regulated and wholesale market-based structures, focusing on various attempts to introduce market competition into aspects of the industry and to strengthen incentives for utility investment in energy efficiency. Finally, students will examine various approaches to subsidization of utility scale renewable energy and the growth of distributed energy. Throughout, the course will focus on the sometimes cooperative, sometimes competing, but ever evolving federal and state roles in regulating the supply of electric power. Students will write two 1000 word response papers to questions related to readings and outside speakers in addition to taking a final exam. Elements used in grading: Class participation (20%), written assignments (40%), and final exam (40%).
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 4004: Cybersecurity: A Legal and Technical Perspective

This class will use the case method to teach basic computer, network, and information security from technology, law, policy, and business perspectives. Using real world topics, we will study the technical, legal, policy, and business aspects of an incident or issue and its potential solutions. The case studies will be organized around the following topics: vulnerability disclosure, state sponsored sabotage, corporate and government espionage, credit card theft, theft of embarrassing personal data, phishing and social engineering attacks, denial of service attacks, attacks on weak session management and URLs, security risks and benefits of cloud data storage, wiretapping on the Internet, and digital forensics. Students taking the class will learn about the techniques attackers use, applicable legal prohibitions, rights, and remedies, the policy context, and strategies in law, policy and business for managing risk. Grades will be based on class participation, two reflection papers, and a final exam. Special Instructions: This class is limited to 65 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (30 students will be selected by lottery) and students from Computer Science (30 students) and International Policy Studies (5 students). Elements used in grading: Class Participation (20%), Written Assignments (40%), Final Exam (40%). Cross-listed with Computer Science ( CS 203) and International Policy Studies ( IPS 251).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

(Formerly Law 255) This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam. ENROLLMENT REQUEST FORM: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit the Enrollment Request Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Enrollment Request Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

(Formerly Law 255) This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention to equal protection and substantive due process. Topics addressed will include equal protection in relation to race, gender, and sexual orientation, and substantive due process in relation to privacy, sexuality, and reproductive justice. Elements used in grading: Class attendance and participation and exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Rhode, D. (PI)

MED 258A: Policy Advocacy in Community Health

In order to affect broad-based change in the health of populations, advocates must look upstream to the social and economic factors that impact health. Most powerful among these factors are the policies that shape our lives and the context in which we make individual and collective decisions. This course gives students the skills and tools to influence the policy process through various avenues, including legislative and media advocacy. Students select a current community health issue of interest and track relevant policy initiatives and media coverage of the issue to serve as the foundation for the application of real-time advocacy strategies. Prerequisites: MED 257A or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2016

MGTECON 300: Growth and Stabilization in the Global Economy

This course gives students the background they need to understand the broad movements in the global economy. Key topics include long-run economic growth, technological change, wage inequality, international trade, interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, and monetary policy. By the end of the course, students should be able to read and understand the discussions of economic issues in The Economist, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, or the Congressional Budget Office.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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