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51 - 60 of 119 results for: CSI::policy-government

IPS 207: Governance, Corruption, and Development

The role of governance in the growth and development experience of countries with a focus on the economics of corruption. Topics covered: the concept and measurement of governance; theory and evidence on the impact of corruption on growth and development outcomes, including investment, financial flows, human capital accumulation, poverty and income inequality; the link between governance and financial crises with a focus on the recent global crisis; the cultural, economic, and political determinants of corruption; and policy implications for improving governance. Prerequisite: ECON 50.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

IPS 208A: International Justice (HUMRTS 102)

This course will examine the arc of an atrocity. It begins with an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship on the causes and enablers of mass violence genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and state repression. It then considers political and legal responses ranging from humanitarian intervention (within and without the Responsibility to Protect framework), sanctions, commissions of inquiry, and accountability mechanisms, including criminal trials before international and domestic tribunals. The course will also explore the range of transitional justice mechanisms available to policymakers as societies emerge from periods of violence and repression, including truth commissions, illustrations, and amnesties. Coming full circle, the course will evaluate current efforts aimed at atrocity prevention, rather than response, including President Obama¿s atrocities prevention initiative. Readings address the philosophical underpinnings of justice, questions of institutional design, and the way in which different societies have balanced competing policy imperatives. Cross-listed with LAW 5033.
Last offered: Winter 2017

IPS 210: The Politics of International Humanitarian Action

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 211: The Transition from War to Peace: Peacebuilding Strategies

How to find sustainable solutions to intractable internal conflicts that lead to peace settlements. How institutions such as the UN, regional organizations, and international financial agencies attempt to support a peace process. Case studies include Bosnia, East Timor, Kosovo, Burundi, Liberia, and Afghanistan. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Last offered: Spring 2016

IPS 213: International Mediation and Civil Wars

This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh). In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 224: Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia

This course explores East Asia¿s rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. However, rapid economic growth and development in East Asia was followed by economic stagnation and financial crisis. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, in particular, inequality, demography, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles. Prerequisite course: IPS 206, POLISCI 350B, ECON 102B, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

IPS 236: The Politics of Private Sector Development

This is a case-based course on how to achieve public policy reform with the aim of promoting private sector development in developing countries. It will deal with issues like privatization, reducing informality, infrastructure development, trade promotion, and combatting corruption
Last offered: Spring 2016

IPS 241: International Security in a Changing World (HISTORY 104D, POLISCI 114S)

This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives--from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies--are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

IPS 244: U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia

Case study approach to the study of contemporary U.S. policy towards Japan, Korea, and China. Historical evolution of U.S. foreign policy and the impact of issues such as democratization, human rights, trade, security relations, military modernization, and rising nationalism on U.S. policy. Case studies include U.S.-Japan trade tensions, anti-Americanism in Korea, and cross-straits relations between China and Taiwan. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

IPS 248: America's War in Afghanistan: Multiple Actors and Divergent Strategies

Establishing clear and consistent political-military objectives when waging limited wars is an essential but difficult task. Efforts to develop coherent campaign strategies are complicated by competing interests among US government actors (diplomatic, development, military and intelligence), members of the coalition intervention force, and relevant international organizations. This course will examine post-9/11 efforts to defeat Al Qaeda and stabilize Afghanistan from the perspectives of key US, international, and Afghan actors including the White House, State Department, Defense Department, Central Intelligence Agency, United Nations, NATO, Pakistan, and Afghan political elite and civil society. Classes will include presentations by individuals with firsthand diplomatic and military experience in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Last offered: Spring 2017
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