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31 - 40 of 92 results for: CSI::policy-government

FINANCE 345: History of Financial Crises

Financial crises are as old as financial markets themselves. There are many similarities between historical events. The crisis of 2008, for example, is far from unique. More often than not financial crises are the result of bubbles in certain asset classes or can be linked to a specific form of financial innovation. This course gives an overview of the history of financial crises, asset price bubbles, banking collapses and debt crises. We start with the Tulip mania in 1636 and end with the recent Euro crisis. The purpose of the course is to understand the causes of past crises and to develop a conceptual framework that ties common elements together. We will discuss the lessons that we can draw for financial markets today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Koudijs, P. (PI)

FINANCE 347: Money and Banking

This course is designed to help students understand the connections between money (the Federal Reserve), financial markets, and the macroeconomy. How are interest rates determined, and how does the Federal Reserve conduct monetary policy? How do Federal Reserve actions impact the US as well as other economies? What economic factors drive the yield curves in different bond markets? We will pay particular attention to the banking system, with an eye toward understanding the function, valuation, and regulation of banks. We touch on a number of topics including the role of the Federal Reserve as a lender of last resort during financial crises, unconventional monetary policy tools such as quantitative easing and forward guidance, cryptocurrency, and emerging market financial crises. We will often begin class with a discussion of current macro-financial market events in the context of our course coverage.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GSBGEN 336: Energy Markets and Policy

This is a course on how energy and environmental markets work, and the regulatorymechanisms that have been and can be used to achieve desired policy goals. The courseuses a electricity market game as a central teaching tool. In the game, students play the roleof electricity generators and retailers in order to gain an understanding of how market rules(including environmental regulations and renewable energy mandates) affect the businessstrategy of market participants¿and in turn economic and environmental outcomes.The goal of the course is to provide students with both theoretical and hands-onunderstanding of important energy and environmental market concepts that are critical tomarket functioning but not always widely appreciated. Concepts covered include: 1)regulated price-setting versus price-setting through market mechanisms, 2) BTU arbitragein input energy choices, 3) uniform price vs. pay-as-bid auctions, 4) the ability andincentive to exercise unilateral market power, 5) unilate more »
This is a course on how energy and environmental markets work, and the regulatorymechanisms that have been and can be used to achieve desired policy goals. The courseuses a electricity market game as a central teaching tool. In the game, students play the roleof electricity generators and retailers in order to gain an understanding of how market rules(including environmental regulations and renewable energy mandates) affect the businessstrategy of market participants¿and in turn economic and environmental outcomes.The goal of the course is to provide students with both theoretical and hands-onunderstanding of important energy and environmental market concepts that are critical tomarket functioning but not always widely appreciated. Concepts covered include: 1)regulated price-setting versus price-setting through market mechanisms, 2) BTU arbitragein input energy choices, 3) uniform price vs. pay-as-bid auctions, 4) the ability andincentive to exercise unilateral market power, 5) unilateral versus cooordinated exercise ofmarket power, 6) transmission congestion, 7) forward contracts and their effect on marketfunctioning, 8) dynamic pricing of electricity and active involvement of final demand, 9)the nature of energy reserves, 10) carbon pricing mechanisms including taxes and cap-andtradesystems, 11) renewable portfolio standards and other renewable energy incentives,12) determination of levelized cost of energy (LCOE) and its impact on new capacityinvestment decisions, and 13) interactions between environmental mechanisms andregulations. We will also discuss the key features of the markets for major sources ofenergy such as oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, solar, wind, and biomass.The course is useful background for private sector roles in energy production,research, management, trading, investment, and government and regulatory affairs;government positions in policymaking and regulation; research and policy functions inacademia, think tanks, or consultancies; and non-profit advocacy roles related to energy and the environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

GSBGEN 347: Education Policy in the United States

The course will provide students from different disciplines with an understanding of the broad educational policy context. The course will cover topics including a) school finance systems; b) an overview of policies defining and shaping the sectors and institutional forms of schooling, c) an overview of school governance, d) educational human-resource policy, e) school accountability policies at the federal and state levels; and f) school assignment policies and law, including intra- and inter-district choice policies, desegregation law and policy.
Last offered: Spring 2018

GSBGEN 363: Fiscal Policy

One of every five dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look at the stimulus vs. austerity debate, both within the U.S. and between the U.S. and Europe. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss more »
One of every five dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look at the stimulus vs. austerity debate, both within the U.S. and between the U.S. and Europe. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss process reforms including spending and deficit reduction targets, a balanced budget amendment, and line item veto. We'll cover the major players in the budget debate and understand where the big and small budget decisions are made. We'll look at federal taxation, where the money comes from, how it affects the economy, and how it might be restructured. We'll examine the recommendations of the President's budget commission and see if we can predict what will become of its recommendations. And we'll see if we, as a class, can solve our nation's fiscal problems as Washington has so far been unable to do.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

GSBGEN 383: Practical Policy and Politics

This is a skills / toolbox class, designed for beginners. It is a practical course about policy-making in the U.S. federal government. It will cover three broad subject areas: (1) an assortment of current policy topics; (2) governing processes ¿ how policy gets made in an environment constrained by politics and elections; and (3) practical skills business leaders may need in interacting with government and with policymakers. This class is for beginners and assumes you have no prior experience or knowledge of policy or politics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GSBGEN 532: Clean Energy Opportunities

This course examines business models and opportunities related to clean energy, specifically to low-carbon energy. We examine emerging trends for this sector in the context of technological change, business opportunities and the parameters set by public policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisi more »
Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. In its ninth year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Last year was a presidential election year in the United States, and was an extraordinary event in many respects. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- like last year's campaigns -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.The course is taught by David Demarest, Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Demarest, D. (PI)

GSBGEN 569: The Open Road: Innovation in Cars, Driving, and Mobility

This course will look at ongoing and upcoming innovation in cars, driving, and mobility from three perspectives: (1) technology, (2) economics & business models, and (3) policy. We'll survey changes in powering vehicles (e.g. electrification and biofuels), in-vehicle connectivity and communications, and most especially changes in autonomy and self-driving vehicles. We'll examine at changes in the economics of cars, vehicles, and driving¿new business models, shared ownership, mobility as a service, as well as who some of the major players are in this nascent field and what they are doing/developing. And we'll explore the interactions of technology and economics with policy and broader societal changes¿direct effects like safety, legal liability, and who can drive; indirect effects on traffic, insurance, infrastructure needs, fuel taxes, and the environment; as well as longer-term and even bigger changes in daily life and where and how we live, work, and drive.The class is structured a bit like a large seminar. At the beginning of the quarter each student will, with the instructor, choose a topic to research. The student will interview experts on that topic and then write a memo. Most of our class sessions will be dedicated to discussing the memos written by you and your peers.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

HISTORY 153: Creation of the Constitution

(Same as LAW 230.) The course begins with readings setting forth the intellectual and experiential background of the framing, including common law and natural rights theory, republicanism, economic & political scientific ideas, and colonial and post-Independence experience. We then study large parts of the debates at the Constitutional Convention, primarily using Madison's Notes. Next come the ratification debates, including readings from antifederalist writers, about half of The Federalist, and overviews of the Virginia and New York ratification conventions. We conclude with the addition of the Bill of Rights. Classes consist of a combination of lecture and extensive participation by students. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
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