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11 - 20 of 92 results for: CSI::policy-government

CEE 323A: Infrastructure Finance and Governance

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 262: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 162, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

COMM 308: Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

CS 203: Cybersecurity: A Legal and Technical Perspective (INTLPOL 251)

(Formerly IPS 251) This class will use the case method to teach basic computer, network, and information security from technology, law, policy, and business perspectives. Using real world topics, we will study the technical, legal, policy, and business aspects of an incident or issue and its potential solutions. The case studies will be organized around the following topics: vulnerability disclosure, state sponsored sabotage, corporate and government espionage, credit card theft, theft of embarrassing personal data, phishing and social engineering attacks, denial of service attacks, attacks on weak session management and URLs, security risks and benefits of cloud data storage, wiretapping on the Internet, and digital forensics. Students taking the class will learn about the techniques attackers use, applicable legal prohibitions, rights, and remedies, the policy context, and strategies in law, policy and business for managing risk. Grades will be based on class participation, two refl more »
(Formerly IPS 251) This class will use the case method to teach basic computer, network, and information security from technology, law, policy, and business perspectives. Using real world topics, we will study the technical, legal, policy, and business aspects of an incident or issue and its potential solutions. The case studies will be organized around the following topics: vulnerability disclosure, state sponsored sabotage, corporate and government espionage, credit card theft, theft of embarrassing personal data, phishing and social engineering attacks, denial of service attacks, attacks on weak session management and URLs, security risks and benefits of cloud data storage, wiretapping on the Internet, and digital forensics. Students taking the class will learn about the techniques attackers use, applicable legal prohibitions, rights, and remedies, the policy context, and strategies in law, policy and business for managing risk. Grades will be based on class participation, two reflection papers, and a final exam. Special Instructions: This class is limited to 65 students, with an effort made to have students from Stanford Law School (30 students will be selected by lottery) and students from Computer Science (30 students) and International Policy Studies (5 students). Elements used in grading: Class Participation (20%), Written Assignments (40%), Final Exam (40%). Cross-listed with the Law School ( Law 4004) and International Policy Studies (IPS course number TBD).
Last offered: Spring 2018

CS 377E: Designing Solutions to Global Grand Challenges

In this course we creatively apply information technologies to collectively attack Global Grand Challenges (e.g., global warming, rising healthcare costs and declining access, and ensuring quality education for all). Interdisciplinary student teams will carry out need-finding within a target domain, followed by brainstorming to propose a quarter long project. Teams will spend the rest of the quarter applying user-centered design methods to rapidly iterate through design, prototyping, and testing of their solutions. This course will interweave a weekly lecture with a weekly studio session where students apply the techniques hands-on in a small-scale, supportive environment.
Last offered: Spring 2019

EASTASN 262: Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present (EASTASN 162)

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 285: The United States, China, & Global Security (INTLPOL 285)

This graduate-level seminar will be taught simultaneously on the campuses of Stanford University and Peking University and will feature a lecture series in which prominent American and Chinese scholars provide presentations that focus on key global security issues. The course content will highlight topics relevant to current U.S.- China relations and their respective roles in Asian and global security. Proposed lecture topics include: an introduction to U.S.- China relations; finance, trade, and investment; cyber security; nonproliferation; maritime security; terrorism; and energy and the environment. Hosted jointly by Stanford University and Peking University, enrollment will be limited to 20 students at each campus and, at Stanford, will be restricted to graduate students and undergraduates with senior standing. Enrollment is competitive, so potential students must complete an application by March 12, 2018 at 5pm: https://web.stanford.edu/dept/CEAS/EASTASN285.fb
Last offered: Spring 2018

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 141: Public Finance and Fiscal Policy (PUBLPOL 107)

What role should and does government play in the economy? What are the effects of government spending, borrowing, and taxation on efficiency, equity and economic stability and growth? The course covers economic, historical and statistical analyses and current policy debates in the U.S. and around the world. Policy topics: Fiscal crises, budget deficits, the national debt and intergenerational equity; tax systems and tax reform; social security and healthcare programs and reforms; transfers to the poor; public goods and externalities; fiscal federalism; public investment and cost-benefit analysis; and the political economy of government decision-making. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51), ECON 52 (can be taken concurrently).
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Goulder, L. (PI)
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