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1 - 7 of 7 results for: CSI::impactfunding ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ECON 125: Economic Development, Microfinance, and Social Networks

An introduction to the study of the financial lives of households in less developed countries, focusing on savings, credit, informal insurance, the expansion of microfinance, social learning, public finance/redistribution, and social networks. Prerequisites- Econ 51 or Publpol 51 and Econ 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

EDUC 377C: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intel more »
(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GSBGEN 305: Investing for Good

Investing for Good will introduce students to the entire spectrum of purposeful, values-driven, and impact investing. We examine the field from the perspective of an institutional investor (i.e. fund manager, investment advisor, endowment manager, head of a family office, etc). Our goal is to have students emerge with a practical and analytical framework for: 1. evaluating impact and mission-aligned investments across multiple asset classes and sectors; 2. constructing a portfolio using impact as a lens; 3. designing an impact investment company; and 4. understanding the many practical and theoretical challenges confronting this exciting emerging field.We start by exploring some fundamental questions: what is a purposeful or impact investment; can impact investments be defined along a spectrum between conventional investing and philanthropy; whose money is it; what are the constraints and opportunities; how do we (re)define return and/or performance. We briefly analyze impact investing more »
Investing for Good will introduce students to the entire spectrum of purposeful, values-driven, and impact investing. We examine the field from the perspective of an institutional investor (i.e. fund manager, investment advisor, endowment manager, head of a family office, etc). Our goal is to have students emerge with a practical and analytical framework for: 1. evaluating impact and mission-aligned investments across multiple asset classes and sectors; 2. constructing a portfolio using impact as a lens; 3. designing an impact investment company; and 4. understanding the many practical and theoretical challenges confronting this exciting emerging field.We start by exploring some fundamental questions: what is a purposeful or impact investment; can impact investments be defined along a spectrum between conventional investing and philanthropy; whose money is it; what are the constraints and opportunities; how do we (re)define return and/or performance. We briefly analyze impact investing in the context of modern portfolio theory. We then develop a framework for portfolio construction and evaluation across four criteria: risk, return, liquidity, and impact. Through a combination of class dialogues, role plays, and case discussions, we will explore a wide variety of asset classes, impact themes, and investment challenges. A series of team-based investment committee simulations will comprise a significant portion of the course and will provide a significant experiential learning experience.Previous experience in finance, investing, social enterprise, entrepreneurship, or philanthropy is not required, but both helpful and welcomed. While first year students are encouraged to enroll, students who have limited familiarity with the basics of investing and corporate finance are strongly encouraged to purchase David Swensen's "Pioneering Portfolio Management" and cover the recommended chapters in advance of the course. It's is also important to note that this class will require financial modeling and detailed investment analysis.Many of the issues we'll be tackling have no unambiguous answers. Lively discussion and debate will be necessary and expected.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

GSBGEN 319: Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing

The course will be structured around the perspective of a foundation or a high net worth individual who has decided to devote substantial resources to philanthropy and wishes to decide which philanthropic goals to pursue and how best to achieve them. Although there are no formal prerequisites for the course, we will assume that students have experience working at a foundation, nonprofit organization, impact investing fund, or similar organization, or have taken an introductory course in strategic philanthropy such as GSBGEN 381. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's course, Problem Solving for Social Change ( GSBGEN 367) , which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 367: Problem Solving for Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

POLISCI 236: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

STRAMGT 584: Assessing High Impact Business Models in Emerging Markets

In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by more »
In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by the success of these new businesses? The seminar is a good match for Stanford students interested in working or investing in emerging markets. It will be taught by Matt Bannick, who led Omidyar Network (a $1 billion impact investing fund) and is the former President of eBay International and of PayPal.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Bannick, M. (PI)
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